Author Topic: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)  (Read 2120 times)

Offline Piff

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Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« on: June 28, 2012, 05:09:08 pm »
   
"Buck Ghosthorse" Lakota Impersonator archives http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=44.0

He changed his name in 1992 from Leonard Albert Mattern

http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/Record/View/39922B35D01BE1D482EA097146E1D0DD

Record Series:    Auditor Misc Records
Collection:    Snohomish County Auditor, Miscellaneous Recordings
County:    Snohomish

Auditor File Number:    9210050173-0
Document Type:    NAME CHANGE ORDER
Recording Date:    10/5/1992
Party Name:    GHOSTHORSE BUCK
Party Type:    PETITIONERS FULL NAME (NEW)
Party Name:    MATTERN LEONARD ALBERT
Party Type:    PETITIONERS FULL NAME (OLD)
« Last Edit: July 17, 2013, 11:20:39 pm by Piff »

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2013, 10:05:33 pm »
Transcribed from The Goldendale Sentinel - March 22, 2007 http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1433&dat=20070322&id=aJk8AAAAIBAJ&sjid=JfcFAAAAIBAJ&pg=906,4420585

Buck Ghost Horse
1940 - 2007

It is with sadness that we announce the crossing of Buck Ghost Horse on  March 5, 2007.

Buck Ghost Horse, was born on the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota, to the Lakota Nation in 1940.

In 1962, he joined the Marine Corps and served two duties in Vietnam. He received purple hearts and a Silver Star for his bravery there and ended his nine year stay in the Marine Corps as a drill instructor at Paris Island. He graduated from the University of Florida in History Education and was a member of the American Indian Treaty Council.

For three years he taught in the Institute of Culture and Creation Spirituality at Holy Names College, in Oakland, Calif., and received an award from the Native American Alcoholism Program in Oakland for his work with that organization. In addition to being an adjunct professor at Holy Names College, he was in demand as a lecturer around the country speaking on native spirituality, culture, history, and law. He authored Red Nations Sacred Way.

Whereever he went, people circled around him, eager to learn - whether in California, North Carolina, New York, Oregon, Georgia, Washington, or Canada. In 1994 he established a spiritual community based on Lakota traditional values, culture, and spiritual teachings in Goldendale. Mentored by his traditional grandfathers and the late Wallace Black Elk, he was a Sundance intercessor for the Sungleska Oyate. He envisioned a ceremony for older women to help overcome the abuses of the past in this culture, and worked closely with addicted youth and adults for their own liberation through traditional ceremony. He leaves behind in Goldendale an active community of some 600 people and thousands of others around the country of all races and traditions whose lives were positively affected by his work.

He was involved in political struggles of justice for Native American Peoples, the protection of native graves and sacred sites, Native treaty rights, and received a certificate in Origins of Indian Law.

In 2006, he received a Native American Medal of Honor for his military service in Viet Nam. He was also active within the Democratic Party and a frequent "Letters to the Editor" contributer to the local papers within his community of Goldendale. He is survived by his wife Vicki; his daughter, Melissa; seven children, Paul, Chad, J.R., Cynthia, Pat, Katie and Sharona; 13 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Paid Obituary

------------
In the book The Hidden Spirituality of Men: Ten Metaphors to Awaken the Sacred Masculine by Matthew Fox it is claimed that Buck Ghosthorse:

was a "Mentor Warrior"
grew up on the Rosebud Reservation
as a boy was kidnapped by Mormons who did not allow him to speak his language or practice his native ceremonies
he escaped the Mormons by joining the Marines
he had dreams he should work with white people because "they were running things and the earth was in deep trouble"
presented Matthew Fox with a sacred pipe and also guided his vision quest

(some of this book can be viewed on Google Books)

« Last Edit: July 17, 2013, 11:21:14 pm by Piff »

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2013, 06:29:11 pm »
A 69 year old woman in July 2003 "suffered from burns when a propane space heater inside her tepee ignited her shawl and dress. She was attending a campout at Buck GhostHorse's property west of Goldendale". She died at a burn unit in a Portland Oregon hospital, she'd been airlifted directly there.

Buck described her as a "respected elder of her Aleaut people and our Sicangu-Sungleska Nations". "She was a leader of women's ceremony and a Sun Dancer."

http://gld.stparchive.com/Archive/GLD/GLD07172003P01.php

Offline debbieredbear

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2013, 09:09:14 pm »
And Buck took Cher Bear's sacred items and distributed them to members of his group and then lied to her family about them. He told them that he "didn't knowA" where they were. One recipient had an eagle feather, a non-native man, and after his family was killed in a car crash in Oregon, he found out that he essentially had a stolen eagle feather and gave it to her family. I know/knew many of her friends. They despised buck and his minions.

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2015, 05:43:02 pm »
Quote
Elder Support Fund
Rob West's fundraiser for SUNGLESKA OYATE
One of the primary missions of Sungleska is to support indigenous Elders in their continuing efforts to provide traditional education.
A donation to Sungleska Oyate helps fund traditional teachings from ceremonial Elders of many faiths. Many of these Elders are on fixed incomes, or are unemployed. We seek to raise money to assist these national treasures by providing money for their travel, food and lodging when they are invited to bring teachings to the people. We only support those teachers who do not charge for their teachings, and only seek to offset the costs that might prevent them from volunteering to teach.

Organization Information

SUNGLESKA OYATE
649 GARRISON RD
% Franklin McPherson GOLDENDALE, WA 98620
EIN: 260107295

https://www.razoo.com/story/Elder-Support-Fund

They want to raise 5 thou, fortunately no one has donated to this particular fund. Rob West is Jennessa West's husband. Jennessa West is the registered agent for Washington state nonprofit corporation. Both of the Wests otherwise are in the film industry.

Quote
SUNGLESKA OYATE
UBI Number   602450391
Category   REG
Profit/Nonprofit   Nonprofit
Active/Inactive   Active
State Of Incorporation   WA
WA Filing Date   11/24/2004
Expiration Date   11/30/2015
Inactive Date   
Duration   Perpetual
Agent Name   Jennessa West

https://www.sos.wa.gov/corps/search_detail.aspx?ubi=602450391

I've not found a lot of current overt discussion of Sungleska online, Jennessa West for instance on her Facebook has "A certain native uncle of mine (that many of you know)" which would refer to Buck Ghosthorse / Leonard Albert Mattern, but not much else. I wonder if current members are keeping things discreet for now?

This man in Washington state does refer to the group:

Quote
Tim Iistowanohpataakiiwa, M.A.
Native American Traditionalist & Spiritual Guide

Sungleska Oyata Tiospye

Masters of Divinity, Vancouver School Theology

http://www.bainbridgepsychology.com/Principals.html

Quote
He is a Sun Dancer, and has danced this most sacred ceremony for a  decade.  His Tiospia, or extended Sun Dance family, are Bear Medicine Healers, who dance in South East Washington.

http://www.bainbridgepsychology.com/AboutTim.html

From what I can see of IRS records online, the group seems to be usually in the red financially, although they have been bringing in contributions.

As for that Elder Support Fund - which Elders? How do we know the money will get to the right place?

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2015, 05:45:51 pm »
From a past website, is this group still doing these activities?

Quote
Sungleska Foundation is committed to helping communities, agencies, and individuals live in a healthy and balanced way. The Sungleska Foundation Board of Directors acknowledges and supports the teachings of indigenous peoples, especially the Lakota Indians, as being beneficial to individuals and groups seeking to learn how to live more in harmony with their environment and with nature. The Board accepts and supports the tradition of offering Native American teachings and ceremonies freely to people. While donations may be accepted, there will never be a financial fee or charge.

The name SUNGLESKA OYATE means “Spotted Horse Nation” in Lakota, and is our way of honoring the horse nation, respected by the Lakota peoples as being one of the few animals known to adopt others into their families. Sungleska Foundation is committed to supporting programs and activities that promote better understanding between peoples of all races and ethnicities of how we are all one family. This understanding is best expressed in the phrase “mitakuye oyasin,” which the Lakota people often say at the end of a prayer. It means “All my relations.”

Sungleska Foundation wishes to support organized events in which native and non-native people can learn more about the culture and traditions of indigenous peoples, particularly of the Lakota Indians. Support may include provision of space, volunteer work, materials, or transportation as needed. Specific activities that Sungleska Foundation wishes to support include, but are not limited to the following:

1. LAKOTA INDIAN CEREMONIES

a. Inipi Ceremony. Commonly referred to as sweat lodge, the inipi ceremony has been used for centuries by many Native American peoples for spiritual and physical health. Lodges today are usually made from young saplings bent to the shape of a half dome and covered with blankets and plastic tarps. Stones that have been heated in a fire outside the lodge are brought into the lodge, and water is poured over them to create steam. Participants usually sing, pray, and/or meditate. Inipi's are also opportunities for friends and relatives to spend time together for fellowship and for mutual support in times of difficulty. For many, the sweat lodge represents the womb of the mother, and helps connect participants to the earth and to the spiritual world.

b. Hanbleceya Ceremony. Hanbleceya, or Vision Quest, is another ceremony of many Native American peoples that has been used for centuries to help individuals receive direction for their lives. Hanbleceya involves the setting aside of a time and place, alone out in nature, to communicate with one’s Creator and to explore that which is within. Individuals welcome and receive dreams, or visions from Spirit. Young men may do this to find out what their individual role in life is, others may seek guidance or assistance from Spirit for future undertakings. For others it is simply a way of reconnecting with nature, with a Higher Being, or with their inner spirit. Participants usually go into the sweat lodge with elders or other supporters for guidance and support before and after vision questing.

c. Wiwayang Wacipi ceremony. Wiwayang Wacipi, also known as the Sun Dance, is one of the oldest and most sacred ceremonies of the North American Plains Indians. Held once a year, usually in summer, it is a ceremony based on renewal, self-sacrifice, and thanksgiving. It is called by its name as a way of honoring the sun as the source of light, love, and warmth on the Earth Mother. Most Sun Dances begin with the construction of a circular shade arbor around a solemnly chosen and cut central tree. The tree stands as a connection between the People and the Creator, and on it are placed sacred items that carry the prayers of the participants upward. Some men and women pledge to dance and make a commitment for four years to do this sacred ceremony. During the time periods of dancing and prayer, accompanied by singing, drumming, and prayer from supporters in the shade arbor, are interspersed with periods of rest and meditation. This commitment has been done for centuries by native people of this continent, and others as well, as a way of committing their lives to the protection of future generations.

d. Isnati ceremony. Winyan Isnati (Womanhood ceremony) is a Lakota rite in which a young woman reaching puberty learns her role as a Life-giver, receiving lessons on becoming and being a woman. It is a recognition of honor in being a woman, a time of celebration, of knowing that the potential of life and the ability to create it exists within. She is taught about the sacred time of the month-called Isnati (camps alone)-that she will experience from then on. It is also known as "moon time" as a way of recognizing the connection between the natural cleansing cycle that occurs within and the waxing and waning of Grandmother Moon in the sky above each month. She learns what to do and what not to do during her menses so that she can purge her body safely of negative energies and replenish with positive ones. She is taught the four stages of life: from a newborn spirit, to a young woman, to a Mother, to a Grandmother. While the isnati is usually held for young women as a coming of age ceremony, it is also meant to honor women of any age who wish to reconnect with that element of their identity from which their conventional upbringing may have estranged them.

e. Hunka ceremony. The Hunka ceremony is a Lakota ceremony in which two persons adopt the Hunka relationship toward each other and thereby both assume a more familial relationship with all for whom the ceremony has been performed. The relationship of Hunka is similar to “adoption” in mainstream American culture, but it binds each to his Hunka by ties of fidelity stronger than friendship, brotherhood, or family. Hunka relationships are believed to extend beyond this life into the next one, and those related to each other by Hunka are expected to support and defend each other as parents do for their children.

f. Lowanpi ceremony. The lowanpi is a Lakota ceremony used for healing or for finding the causes of sickness. It takes place when an individual asks for it, usually by presenting a cannumpa (sacred pipe) to a medicine man or healer. The ceremony usually takes place in a darkened room, where the ones to be healed are joined by friends and family who sing special healing songs. The medicine man acts as an interpreter for the spirits who are called in to help with the healing.

g. Long house ceremonies. Long houses are the traditional dwelling places of the Northwest Coastal Indians. Because they also serve as sites for a variety of meetings and religious ceremonies, long houses also symbolize cultural and social solidarity for the people as well.

h. Potlatch. Potlatches are ceremonial feasts of the Northwest Coastal Indians in which the host and his or her relatives lavishly distribute gifts to invited guests. Gifts distributed may include foodstuffs, household goods, ceremonial blankets, or prized personal possessions as well as less tangible things such as names, songs, dances, and crests. The purposes of these giveaways are for individuals to share all that they have in order that the People may live, as well as to let go the ideas of importance connected with those possessions. The potlatch ceremony also involves dancing, feasting, and other rituals, often lasting for several days.

2. INFORMAL CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE FOLLOWING TOPICS:

Spiritual beliefs and practices
Ceremonial songs
Language (spoken and written)
Natural medicines
Storytelling
Wilderness awareness skills
Indigenous arts and crafts
Cross-cultural awareness and understanding
History and sociology

https://web.archive.org/web/20100106200834/http://www.sungleska.org/pages/activities.php

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2015, 05:51:07 pm »
Further evidence of Buck Ghosthorse not being who he claimed he was:

Quote
Name:   Leonard Albert Mattern Jr
[Buck Ghosthorse Jr]
Gender:   Male
Race:   White
Birth Date:   10 Mar 1942
Birth Place:   Aliquippa Be, Pennsylvania
Death Date:   5 Mar 2007
Type of Claim:   Original SSN.
Notes:   Jan 1957: Name listed as LEONARD ALBERT MATTERN JR; 03 Feb 1993: Name listed as BUCK GHOSTHORSE

Source Information
Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2015, 07:48:17 pm »
Leonard Albert Mattern Jr.
10 March 1942 Pennsylvania
5 Mar 2007 Goldendale, Washington

Changed his name legally to Buck Ghosthorse in 1992
http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/Record/View/39922B35D01BE1D482EA097146E1D0DD

Listed white by Social Security, records include his name change
---
Father
Leonard Albert Mattern Sr.
1917 Pennsylvania
1983 Florida

white in all federal censuses

Florida Death Index
Name:   Leonard Albert Mattern
Race:   White
Age at Death:   66
Birth Date:   12 Aug 1917
Death Date:   30 Aug 1983
Death Place:   Orange, Florida, United States
---

Mother
Maxine Estella King
1923 Pennsylvania
2011 Florida

white in census
---
Paternal grandfather
Charles Theodore Mattern
1885 Pennsylvania
1958 Pennsylvania

white in census

white in death record:

Name:   Charles Theodore Mattern
Gender:   Male
Race:   White
Age:   72
Birth Date:   24 Jul 1885
Birth Place:   Centre County, Pennsylvania
Death Date:   6 Apr 1958
Death Place:   Clairton, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA
Father Name:   Harvey Mattern
Mother Name:   Ellen Bush
Certificate Number:   33187

U.S., World War I Draft Registration:
Name:   Charles Theodore Mattern
City:   Duquesne
County:   Allegheny
State:   Pennsylvania
Birth Date:   24 Jul 1885
Race:   White
---

paternal grandmother
Pearl Levadie Thompson

1894   Pennsylvania
1978  Pennsylvania
white in census
---
maternal grandfather
Orville King
1903 Pennsylvania
 Pennsylvania

white in census

Name:   Orville King
Age in 1910:   7
Birth Year:   abt 1903
Birthplace:   Pennsylvania
Home in 1910:   Wayne, Greene, Pennsylvania
Race:   White
---
maternal grandmother

Estella Keener
1895 Pennsylvania
1986 New Jersey

white in census

Records through ancestry.com and familysearch.org

Offline debbieredbear

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2015, 02:49:19 am »

OMG!! This guy used to be around Suquamish and called himself "Father Tim"! He was run out of here a couple of years ago because of some , ahem, "Improprieties". He used to have "drumming circles" at the local United Church of Christ, where you can rent the facility for monthly or weekly activities. He was NOT affiliated with that church. I want that to be clear.  I can't remember what exactly the accusations were, but not nice things, and he has not set foot here since then, even though Bianbridge Island is 10 minutes away. And we just had Chief Seattle Days where he used to come every year. So somone maybe threatened to expose or arrest him, I dunno.

Quote

This man in Washington state does refer to the group:

Quote
Tim Iistowanohpataakiiwa, M.A.
Native American Traditionalist & Spiritual Guide

Sungleska Oyata Tiospye

Masters of Divinity, Vancouver School Theology

http://www.bainbridgepsychology.com/Principals.html

Quote
He is a Sun Dancer, and has danced this most sacred ceremony for a  decade.  His Tiospia, or extended Sun Dance family, are Bear Medicine Healers, who dance in South East Washington.

http://www.bainbridgepsychology.com/AboutTim.html

From what I can see of IRS records online, the group seems to be usually in the red financially, although they have been bringing in contributions.

As for that Elder Support Fund - which Elders? How do we know the money will get to the right place?

and what the heck?

  http://www.bainbridgepsychology.com/CankuWakan.html

Quote
Canku Wakan (pronounced Chonku wah-kahn) means “Sacred Road” in the Lakota language.  Canku  Wakan spiritual direction is a means for individuals from any walk of life to grow spiritually using understandings drawn from the Native American tradition. Canku Wakan spiritual direction is usually conducted in the office setting. The initial visit helps travelers clarify their starting point and their intended destination. As the traveler’s journey progresses, between-session experiences, song, and other means of walking the Sacred Road will help illuminate the travelers path, and enrich the spiritual journey. 


   


Spiritual direction is provided on a fee-for-service basis. Fees range from $70 to $90 an hour, on a sliding scale basis. In keeping with the Old Way, there is no charge for traditional Native ceremonies which may be part of the journey for some travelers as they progress down their road. 
   


Somehow, I remember him claiming a different tribe than Lakota, but I can't remember which. I do know he was supposed to be from Canada.

Oh wait! Now he is claiming  this:
Quote
Tim was born in Blackfoot Country, Montana, of Siksika and Northern Peigan tribal heritage.

So WHY would a Siksika/Northern Piegan teach "Lakota"??? Correct me if I am wrong, but I don't remember them being allies.

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2015, 04:01:31 pm »
I wondered if you knew of him Debbie. His FB has not been updated for awhile and still reads Suquamish as location. He is listed as a non-parochial Episcopal reverend here http://www.norcalepiscopal.org/iistowanohpataakiiwa-tim



He does have some Sungleska Oyate members on his FB. He might be due for a research needed thread of his own too.

Offline debbieredbear

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2015, 04:45:08 pm »
Quote
[He might be due for a research needed thread of his own too./quote]

Could be. I did not have a lot of interaction with him. I spoke to him a few times, but he seemed "odd" to me. A friend, Tony, who I had a lot of respect for, said that this guy "should not be teaching anything" as he didn't KNOW anything. Tim used to walk around Suquamish in a ribbon shirt and moccassins, trying to present himself as "traditional." I would ask my friend, K, who told me he's been kicked out of Suquamish, but she is over in Seattle having surgery, then she is leaving  to visit family. Tim used to post flyers all around inviting people to his doings.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2015, 12:47:38 am by debbieredbear »

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2015, 05:26:20 pm »
There is further info on Ghosthorse / Mattern on this forum, make sure to search from the home page http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php to find the full results. When searching online otherwise make sure to check both Ghosthorse and Ghost Horse as surname.

Quote
We know they were doing a lot of hurting to people. A lot of people wanted him out of state. Down here white people are always looking for something to try to make them Indian. They are what is considered New Agers. Ghost Horse and his crew “were doing acid and sending people out on their vision quests while they were tripping on LSD. They were paying $500 to get a vision quest like that.

http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=44.0

Chad Mayo Ghost Horse

Quote
Chad says he was adopted as an infant, that he doesn't know his heritage, and that later he was adopted spiritually by Lakota Indian Buck Ghosthorse.

From Washington state court records:

Quote
Mayo, Chad Everett
Old Name                                               E. Klickitat Distric    CN-96-006    09-11-1996

Ghost Horse, Chad Mayo
New Name                                       E. Klickitat Distric    CN-96-006    09-11-1996

Search http://dw.courts.wa.gov/?fa=home.namesearchTerms



http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=2705.msg35267#msg35267

Paul Ghosthorse

Quote
Paul Ghosthorse says that his father Buck Ghosthorse grew up on Rosebud and had a Rosebud ID number, also that he didn't have a birth certificate because all the birth certificates at that location were lost in a fire.

http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=2705.15

Snohomish county records:

Quote
Document Detail
Instrument #:   9210160467   
Date Filed:   10/16/1992 12:00:00 AM
Document Type:   NAME CHANGE ORDER
Grantors
1   SAHAYDA PAUL PETER      
Grantees
1   GHOST-HORSE PAUL PETER SAHAYDA 
   

Search http://www.snoco.org/RecordedDocuments/RealEstate/SearchEntry.aspx

J.R. Ghosthorse

Quote
Instrument #:   9404260646
Date Filed:   04/26/1994 12:00:00 AM
Document Type:   NAME CHANGE ORDER
Grantors
1   FERNANDO BRUNO ARANDA JR      
Grantees
1   GHOSTHORSE J R


http://www.snoco.org/RecordedDocuments/RealEstate/SearchDetail.aspx 

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2015, 05:34:37 pm »
Katy Ghosthorse

Quote
My name is Katy GhostHorse and I live in Goldendale, WA.

I live on 150 acres of land.  The basis of who I am is rooted in the native traditions of the Lakota way and I live by these traditions 24/7.  My father is a traditional elder and teaches these traditions that are dated back many thousands of years.  My name, GhostHorse, is on the Wounded Knee Monument in South Dakota.

http://topmts.tripod.com/thephlyingphalanges/id1.html

Quote
Collection:   Klickitat County Auditor, Miscellaneous Recordings
County:   Klickitat
Auditor File Number:   259811
Document Type:   NAME/CHANGE
Recording Date:   6/3/1997
Party Name:   PIERONI, KATHLEEN BETH
Party Type:   Name
Party Name:   GHOSTHORSE, KATY KIMIMILA BETH
Party Type:   New Name

http://dw.courts.wa.gov/index.cfm?fa=home.namesearchTerms

Pat Ghosthorse

Quote
Instrument #:   9405100561
Date Filed:   05/10/1994 12:00:00 AM
Document Type:   NAME CHANGE ORDER   
Grantors
1   RAMSEY PATRICIA LOUISE      
Grantees
1   GHOSTHORSE PAT
   

 http://www.snoco.org/RecordedDocuments/RealEstate/SearchEntry.aspx

Offline Piff

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Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2015, 06:01:45 pm »
Buck / Leonard changed his name in 1992:

Quote
Instrument #:   9210050173   
Date Filed:   10/05/1992 12:00:00 AM
Document Type:   NAME CHANGE ORDER
   Grantors
1   MATTERN LEONARD ALBERT      
Grantees
1   GHOSTHORSE BUCK     


http://www.snoco.org/RecordedDocuments/RealEstate/SearchDetail.aspx

He married Vicki in 1993, she was Vicki Lane Redd at the time, her surname from a prior marriage.

Vicki Ghosthorse

Quote
Vicki Ghost Horse, Lakota
Vicki Ghost Horse is of Scotch/Irish and Cherokee/Chickasaw heritage, and was raised within the white southern culture of family and church. She was an active member of Christian religion for 35 years, attended her first Sacred Pipe ceremony when she was 38 years old, and has lived the Red Road of Lakota tradition ever since.

“I was the wife of Sundance leader Buck Ghost Horse, who was also head Elder of Sungleska Oyate, until his death in 2007. I continue to be a gatherer and teacher of natural medicines and root foods of the Eastern Washington area, a water pourer, traditional singer, and helper within my extended family's ceremonies and Sundance.

http://www.hartwick.edu/academics/special-opportunities/annual-academic-theme/balance/native-balance/presenter-biographies

Her mother's obituary:

Quote
Mamie Elaine Barlow, 91, born October 1, 1922 passed away November 14, 2013. She is survived by her daughters that loved her, Vicki Ghost Horse and Susan Watson; her grandchildren that adored her, Brian Belcher, Douglas Belcher, Kelly Belcher Johnson, Holly Watson Conrad, Andy Watson, and Ryan Redd; as well as her thirteen great-grandchildren. Elain also leaves behind her wonderful Watter’s Road Family who meant so much to her.

She was preceded in death by her husband, William Dawson (Red) Barlow; and their oldest child, Sonja Gail Belcher; parents, Johnnie and Mamie Harrod; brothers, Jerrell Harrod, and Elgin Harrod; by her sister, Doris Sharp, and by many loving family and friends. A Memorial Service will be held at 10 am, Saturday, November 23, 2013, at Watters Road Church of Christ, 3616 Watters Road, Pasadena, Texas 77504.

http://www.obitsforlife.com/obituary/804222/Barlow-Mamie.php

This obituary gives enough information for a genealogy work up. I've checked back to Vicki's great grandparents and am only seeing what she calls "white southern culture".

Vicki and Pat are still registered to vote at the Goldendale, WA land address. J.R. was also but is no longer. Katy is registered to vote elsewhere in Goldendale.

Sungleska Oyate still exists as a corporation and there were recent fund raising attempts. On the Goldendale land they have a Ghost Horse Family Cemetery http://www.duvallandmoore.com/notices/Tyler-Williams

Matthew Fox, prominent in the New Age movement, one of Mattern's boosters, wrote in a piece about Mattern / Ghosthorse and his sundance that ".. I had a striking experience in which my Christian roots and my native roots (everyone imbibes Native American spirits on the land they have long inhabited) came crashing together." (Book titled Meister Eckhart: A Mystic-Warrior for Our Times)

All us white folks need to stop "imbibing" "Native American spirits". Living here does not give us permission to rip cultures off.




Offline Piff

  • Posts: 1627
Re: Buck Ghosthorse (Leonard Albert Mattern)
« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2015, 06:14:34 pm »
This woman became ill at Ghosthorse  ceremonies, she says she never recovered:

Quote
I'm compelling to tell my story. In 1998 a friend saw a sweatlodge along the
 shore of Lake Michigan behind someone's house a couple of miles from my
house. She told me about it right away. I asked if she had talked to them.
 She said, No, I thought you should. A few days later, I knocked at the door.
 The woman opened it, took one look at me and said, "It took you long enough.
 I've been waiting for you. Come in!"

My friends and family spent a long year studying with her and her husband.
 They are from the Ghosthorse clan of the Lakota. The next year we also went
 to Sundance at Uncle Buck Ghosthorse's place in Goldendale, WA. My now
 ex-husband did his first Vision Quest there. The night he was on the hill,
 I got the flu. My empathic nature tapped right into his Power animal at the
 same time it appeared early on the last morning.

 Later that day, I was the first of 30 women to go Moon. I was getting
 sicker, fever, fluish.... I felt awful for a couple of days. Then I started
 feeling a little better but I was up in the Moon camp the whole time the
 dance was on. The bottom line is this, I never recovered.

 A couple years later, my elders came to visit me in the nursing home. I'm
guessing it was Aug. or Sept. of 2002. I had a very wild, vivid dream time
for months in that place. I kept 'knowing' that I needed my Lakota name for
 some reason. They heard me and came from NC. They gave me the teachings and
 helped set it all up. It was very easy. I was given my name in dream time
 complete with Spirits easily recognizable to them. My name is Bright Star.

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