Author Topic: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe  (Read 27654 times)

Offline debbieredbear

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2012, 09:16:37 pm »
That reminds me. He used to follow a friend of mine around. She is unenrolled, but of Nez Perce heritage. Two Nez Perce ladies in Seattle, knowing her mother's family, took her under their wings and taught her how to dance Nez Perce style. So Roy started copying my friend's dance style! If you saw her dance, and you saw Roy dance, it would be obvious. So she and I privately call Ol' Roy "He Dances Like A  Nez Perce Woman."  :P

Epiphany

  • Guest
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2012, 01:44:24 am »
If this is the first time you've read academic books aimed solely at other academics, I don't blame you. The writing is fairly dense and so concerned with theory that everything else gets lost. Found the book previewed online. Here's what Cowlitz have to say about Wilson:

p. 194 describes Wilson doing a blessing at Koapk, a Cowlizt village dug up by archaeologists. Wilson thought most Cowlitz would be upset because of graves being disturbed. Local Cowlitz were not, said there were no graves there. Wilson did a blessing in Chinook, using a rotation adopted from Plains tribes. Wilson tried to take part in a Lummi smokehouse but the Lummi rejected him and his wife. Wilson is also quoted as saying "The Indian culture is a small part of my life, too small..."

p.195 describes a traditional named Joe Peters as putting Wilson in touch with Mary Kiona. A Cowlitz named Jill talks about Wilson at length:
"Wilson ain't no more a chief than a man in the moon...When he came up here from California, he was a white man when I first saw him, and then all of a sudden he became an Indian preacher and a medicine man and everything else. Going to [Koapk] we were laughing because that place he went to and said it was a fishing hole and some damned thing and had him on Tv blessing it. Nobody in the Cowlizt Tribe even knew about it but he, and he from California."
Later on:
"...the ceremony he performed wasn't worth two cents. It didn't mean nothing to me. We just laughed at him. Pustin, he's a white man."
[Pustin means white, as in from Boston.]

p.209 describes Wilson in detail as someone trying to remake Cowlitz beliefs through what he understands (or believe he does) about Plains beliefs, esp the Seven Arrows fraud. "The signs that are of interest to Wilson are generalized and stereotyped."

p. 210 describes Wilson wearing a jacket to powwows that had a design in beadwork imitating the Plains wheel of life. The two of them talked in detail about Seven Arrows.

That's all that's available for preview.  http://books.google.com/books?id=PpaSbEGmOaEC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

The author uses the phrase "as you know" often along with "as we know",  that makes sense now that I understand this is an academic book aimed solely at academics.

Those excerpts gleaned through google books cover the info on Roy. The book is also worth reading for local history and politics along with info on Cowlitz kinship groups. Roy in past claimed that he was part of the Descendants of Kiscox group, origins of that lineage diagrammed out on pg 136 of book.

On pg 211 he says that his mother, non-NDN, was the daughter of a Methodist missionary to the Yakama. Combine this with his past statement that he isn't NDN at all - maybe that is the truth about his lineage: white Methodist missionaries to the Yakama.


Offline debbieredbear

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2012, 02:21:48 am »
Quote
On pg 211 he says that his mother, non-NDN, was the daughter of a Methodist missionary to the Yakama. Combine this with his past statement that he isn't NDN at all - maybe that is the truth about his lineage: white Methodist missionaries to the Yakama.

I think this may be true. I also think that he may have deliberately said or implied that the one pic is of his father, to back up his claim of being NDN. If that WAS his father, his father would have been in his 50's and that pic does not look like a man in his 50's. To me.

Epiphany

  • Guest
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #33 on: September 08, 2012, 09:42:53 pm »
Since Roy's case happens to combine my interests in genealogical research, Washington state history, and fraudsters - I've been working more on it. Here's what I've come up with:

Roy's past lineage claims all have to do with his paternal grandfather William Ray Wilson (1876 - 1942). Claim is that William Ray was actually the son or grandson of a Cowlitz woman and a French Canadian man, and that he was given to a white man Benjamin Wilson to foster.

1880 federal census Whitman, Washington lists 4 yr old William R with his father Benjamin P Wilson, both white.

In 1895 William Ray Wilson married Clara E Hodges in Whitman, Washington. His parents are listed as B P Wilson and Parthena Fay. Everyone white.
http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/DigitalObject/View/1739F62FDA0BB177C19EDC56337B6F56

(His mother Parthena Fay Wilson had died earlier in 1880, before the 1880 census was taken.)

From about 1912 - 1932 William Ray Wilson, wife, and children (including Roy I Wilson's father Roy Edward Wilson) are on Indian Census Rolls, Yakama. He is listed as Indian on his war draft registration too during that time. In 1932 William, his wife, and two children are each listed as 1/4 in the degree of blood census section.

Reservation agents made the decisions as to who would be on the census rolls. Indian census rolls were often used as a basis for property rights.  About 1930 census rules changed, much more information on each person was then collected. http://www.archives.gov/research/census/native-americans/1885-1940.html

That region was going through a huge population boom, like a gold rush boom town. In this case it was a "fruit rush", all about the irrigated high production fruit orchards.  Railroads, and vastly expanded irrigation of farm land meant there was a lot of work to be had and money to be made.

Before and after that time the Wilsons were identified as white.

So Roy's past lineage claims could be true, or false. He's also said that he is not NDN at all, but he still uses the bio:
Quote
I was born with an Indian father and a non-Indian mother. I have Cowlitz blood, Chinook blood, Yakama blood and Iroquois blood.
http://www.turtleislandstorytellers.net/tis_washington/transcript_r_wilson.htm





Epiphany

  • Guest
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #34 on: March 07, 2013, 06:23:27 pm »
Quote
Medicine Wheel Studies

Learn the teachings of the ancient medicine wheel from Honorary Cowlitz Chief Roy I. Wilson. Each ongoing meeting will focus on a point of the wheel to better understand your human and spiritual self. The medicine wheel is the oldest form of knowledge and Earth based spirituality known on the planet. It has a history and presence all over the globe that goes back forty thousand years and is still practiced and growing in a time of need in today's world. It is interesting to note that you will find all religions, Western and Eastern in these teachings. In these teachings you will find your own way by learning to work with your spirit guides and animal helpers. A daily practice, you will find your balance and life force energy center to help guide you to a more focused way of life..

Our community currently has dozens of clans learning the medicine wheel all over Washington State and around the US and Internationally.


Quote
Raven House offers teachings in Shamanic Journeying, Soul Retrieval, Medicine for the Earth workshops, ceremonies, Drum Circles, Reiki (teaching and sessions), Sound Healing, Purification Ceremonies, Vision Quest (done with respect and permission), Healing with spiritual light, spiritual counseling, field trips, gong and singing bowl concerts.

 We are committed to doing the healing work that is needed in todays environment with trained teachers to create a global web of life for the next seven generations.

 About us

Kyle and Maureen, both of Native American decent, took and interest in their ancestry, and cultural heritage at an early age.

Kyle is a tribally registered Metis, Red River French Canadian, Walla Walla, and Cherokee by decent. With ancestors who inhibited the Columbia River for thousands of years as Walla Walla natives. His grandmother, Lizette Walla Walla, seven generations back saw Lewis and Clark come through the area. The French Canadian side were trappers and boatsman with the Hudson Bay Co. at Fort Vancouver ( Columbia District ) and Fort Walla Walla  ( Snake District ) on the Pacific NW Coast. Columbia district, in the early 1800's. They were some of the first settlers in the Oregon Territories with a colorful family history.

Kyle is a Shamanic Practitioner, Counselor, Life Coach, Teacher who participates in sacred ceremonies, facilitates purification and other ceremonies, and is a pipe carrier.

Kyle is also a Antique Native American Art Dealer working with investors, collectors, dealers, Tribes and Museums. Owning Plains Pacific Gallery for twenty five years performing appraisals, consulting, acquisitions, placement, and restoration. His specialty is locating sacred objects and returning them to the people and bringing them back to life.

 Maureen is also Red River Metis and of Blackfeet, Anishinaabe/Ojibwa decent with family members still carring on the old ways of being bundle keepers, pipe carriers and medicine people in the Great Lakes, Sault St. Marie region.

Maureen studied with William Rand founder of the International Center for Reiki Training www.reiki.org  and is a Professional Member of the ICRT as a Reiki ART/Master practitioner/teacher.

*ART ~ Advanced Reiki Training

Maureen is also a Shamanic Practitioner, Alchemy Practitioner, Intuitive Counselor, Vibrational Sound Therapist, participates in sacred ceremony, lodge pourer and a pipe carrier.

 Their studies include currently working with indigenous tribal elders from around the globe, The Foundation for Shamanic Studies, Micheal Harner, teachers training with Sandra Ingerman, Claude Poncelet, Chief Lelooska, Honorary Cowlitz Chief Roy I. Wilson, Annishanabe, Ojibwa, Peruvian Elders and many other tribal elders.

Raven House Healing Center was founded by Kyle Ward and Maureen Browning in 2005 and is located on ten sacred acres near Castle Rock, WA. in the foot hills of Mt St Helens where ceremonies are held, classes and workshops are taught, lodge, Vision Quests and other teachings are held. There is a general campground, therapy room, trails, and a Ceremonial Coastal Long House is being built.

from the About Us section of http://www.meetup.com/ravenhousehealing/members/



Offline debbieredbear

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #35 on: December 11, 2018, 11:21:35 pm »
Well, well, well. Roy is in trouble:

https://tdn.com/news/local/wilson-i-am-innocent/article_3651a0f8-bda2-5e5f-8f79-d7035a107c9a.html

He lost his "shaman job":

Quote
Wilson, 91, is spry and energetic, and he’s eager to show the artifacts of Native American history he keeps at a museum on the property. But recent events have strained the Cowlitz Indian Tribe’s relationship with its former spiritual leader and left him “heartbroken.”

And may be dis-enrolled:

Quote
ilson said Wednesday that some of the tribe’s powers-that-be want to expel him from the tribe. (He appears before the Cowlitz Tribal Council on Saturday, but the potential consequences were unclear.)

Generally, I am upset by disenrollment. However, since I do not believe that Wilson is Cowlitz, or even Indigenous, I hope the tribe kicks him to the curb.

If you read the whole article, it's ugly. And he blames it all on his wife.





Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 598
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2019, 04:17:51 am »
https://tdn.com/news/local/wilson-i-am-innocent/article_3651a0f8-bda2-5e5f-8f79-d7035a107c9a.html
[…] If you read the whole article, it's ugly.

Unfortunately, from Europe we only get this (from many minor U.S. newspapers):

Quote
451: Unavailable due to legal reasons
We recognize you are attempting to access this website from a country belonging to the European Economic Area (EEA) including the EU which enforces the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and therefore access cannot be granted at this time. For any issues, contact frontdoor@tdn.com or call 877-767-5187.

Offline debbieredbear

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2019, 06:10:33 pm »
This is from a different source:

http://www.chronline.com/crime/charges-filed-in-winlock-animal-abuse-case/article_05e921f2-ef8c-11e8-8721-8fde806efeff.html

Quote
A Lewis County couple has been charged with one felony and five misdemeanors after investigators say they found a pony in so much pain it had to be put down and a number of dogs living in squalid conditions on their property.

Roy I. Wilson, 91, and Cherilyn M. Wilson, 68, both of Winlock were charged with one count of first-degree animal cruelty and five counts of cruelty to animals, a gross misdemeanor.

Neither have been taken into custody.

The couple’s property on Dorning Road was under investigation in September, The Chronicle previously reported. According to reports, a Lewis County Sheriff’s Office deputy, code enforcement officers and a veterinarian found the house was filled with dogs. Reports indicate that, while the house was worse for wear from the numerous dogs living inside, most of the animals appeared to be in adequate health.

However, the vet noted in his report: “The dogs housed in the barn were also living in disgusting conditions. Their runs, inside and outside, were heavily soiled. Their water bowls, while filled, were contaminated with food/dirt, and one had a dead rodent in it. Again, these conditions would be unacceptable by any reasonable person observing them.”

Deputy Prosecutor Brad Meagher said the misdemeanor counts leveled against each suspect were regarding the dogs found in the barn. The lone felony was regarding the pony, which was allegedly found to have been suffering from a hoof condition that made movement painful.

“Laminitis is a very painful condition,” according to court documents. “The owner admitted not seeking attention for her for at least several years. As a result, (the pony) had been suffering for many years. Her conditions of limping and laying down are enough for the average person to identify enough of a problem that should be addressed by a veterinarian.”

Roy Wilson signed the pony over to county authorities during the search, and the pony was put down on the spot, with Roy Wilson saying he would dispose of the body properly.


During an interview with a deputy, Roy Wilson allegedly said Cherilyn Wilson previously kept dogs and some other animals at a spot in Kitsap County, however, he said, deputies and humane society personnel took them away in September.

Roy Wilson was previously known as a spiritual advisor of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, since then, Cowlitz Tribe Secretary David Barnett said he has left that post along with any other involvement with the tribe, and has been asked to appear before the Cowlitz Tribal Council.

“It’s been a long time coming. Tribal members have complained about this behavior for years. … So it’s a relief. I hope that there is a way that all the animals currently in his house are removed, and that they could find a good home for them,” said Barnett.

He added later: “I wish something was done early. It’s horrible. His actions are horrible, and that’s not the Cowlitz way.”

Meagher was unable to advise whether any of the animals on the property had been removed. As of Tuesday, no preliminary appearance for either had been scheduled.

Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 598
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2019, 06:22:53 pm »
Thank you for quoting in full, debbieredbear!

The link itself gives me the same response as I reported in my previous post earlier today.

Offline debbieredbear

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1468
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Roy Wilson - Medicine Wheel Tribe
« Reply #39 on: January 11, 2019, 03:52:40 am »
In one article, Wilson said the tribe was considering disenrolling him. I hope they did. He told so many people he was white and then suddenly he's a  tribal member and a shaman. I don't think so.