Author Topic: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA  (Read 23893 times)

Autumn

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John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« on: October 09, 2013, 04:13:47 am »
I have recently become concerned about this institution since a relative was attending.  I wonder if anyone here has any information about the school they can share.

This is their website:  http://www.universityofsantamonica.edu/

I have not been able to find a lot online, but what I have found is pretty disturbing: 

This is from a blog post from this site:  http://www.yelp.com/biz/university-of-santa-monica-santa-monica

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I attended this program, graduated, and then stayed in the community several years volunteering.

Recently, I talked about my experiences with a therapist who happens to have experience with cult members, and he recommended a book, Combatting Cult Mind Control.

I was like, seriously? But it freaked me the hell out. It describes how cults operate and the techniques they use to recruit and ensnare people, and it fit USM in many, many ways. It's so incredibly messed up to realize it now. I feel like an idiot.

The book also describes how destructive cults often have front organizations, and I now see that USM is just a front for the cult MSIA (Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness). The founder/chancellor of the school, Jon-Roger, is also the founder/guru of MSIA, and from what I could tell, every faculty member at USM is an initiated member of MSIA, not to mention most of the staff.

That Jon-Roger is a lunatic. I saw him speak at a special USM event several years ago, and he's seriously crazy, but the USM faculty are into him. That always seemed weird to me. Now it's worse than weird, it's just wrong. But then, at USM, there's no such thing as right & wrong.

Look Jon-Roger up online and read about his crimes before you consider a program that financially benefits him.

There's a culture within USM of never criticizing the school or the leaders, so it's very difficult for me to write this.

I did feel I learned a lot about myself in the program, but looking back, it freaks me out to see how they're using cult influence techniques and also having amateurs use real counseling skills on each other. That seems irresponsible.

Also, I witnessed people have meltdowns and seizure-like fits (and I've heard about psychotic breaks) during the school sessions, but they give a line about it being 'karma' and 'energy healing' (which I bought at the time). They may have been dangerous situations, at least some of them, in retrospect, but they have an MSIA-initiated doctor on site, so they never had to call an ambulance.

Back to that thing about not criticizing... Part of why there aren't more mixed or negative reviews here is because it's pretty deeply programmed into USMers not to say anything bad about the program or teachers, or to dissent in any way.

In this way, as my therapist helped me see, it's not a university at all. Real universities encourage critical thinking. USM is a personal growth program and their mission is to spread the dogma of their parent cult, MSIA. Their mission statement pretty much says so.

People often leave the program less functional than when they started -- they quit their jobs and start ill-conceived businesses (usually life coaching) and hang around the school for years, like I did (but at least I was employed).

Also, within the teachings is a principle that says anytime you are upset, it's your own fault because of 'unresolved material' in your consciousness. So, anytime the school or any staff member/volunteer/faculty member does anything upsetting, it gets turned back on you and you're told to 'work your process.'

This is another cult technique. There are lots of them at play. Taking personal responsibility is a good lesson, but they take it too far and it becomes a mind-screw because the school doesn't practice what they preach. There is a lot of hypocrisy, and they're slippery about it.

I feel bad posting this (I am a former USMer after all, and I drank the kool-aid about not criticizing), but I feel a responsibility to those who are considering spending their time & money on the program.

Do your own research and think critically about it. Then, even if you decide to go for it, you'll be better informed and less likely to get sucked into the cult or have your life derailed in the process.

One last thing. The author of the cult book, Steve Hassan, has a website with info about cults, and he recently posted a "Benchmark Analysis" that compares USM to a couple small, spiritually based schools based on publicly available records, and the results are pretty damning. It reveals some pretty unsavory facts about the place. You can Google it.

I hope this is helpful.

And this is the "Benchmark Analysis" from Steve Hassan's site listed in the post above:

http://freedomofmind.com/documents/attachment.ashx-1.pdf
http://freedomofmind.com/

The course itself "only" costs $8,325 (plus books) for the first year and $13,225 (plus books) for the second year.  http://www.universityofsantamonica.edu/Pdfs/Financial_Policies.pdf
« Last Edit: October 09, 2013, 08:00:44 pm by educatedindian »

Autumn

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Re: University of Santa Monica - Soul-Centered Education
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2013, 06:14:17 am »
Wow!  Here are three graduates of USM providing counseling services in the state of Washington, when the degrees from USM are only recognized in California and are not accreditated nationally.  I am not sure how they manage that, unless they are managing to operate with Dr. Scott Alpert's Ph.D. from Ryokan College -- but wait, this is what Ryokan's website says about their doctorate in Clinical Psychology:  http://www.ryokan.edu/programs.php (click on Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and this window comes up)

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Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology

(PSY.D. ON CAMPUS AND ONLINE)

A Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. Graduates fulfill the educational requirements for Licensure as a Psychologist in the State of California.
(my bolding - so it is not even a Ph.D., but a Psy.D. -- must have been a typo on his bio page -- he should proof that more carefully ;D ;D) **

http://www.theclearingnw.com/spiritual-psychology/spiritual-psychology-university-santa-monica/

**This is from Ryokan's catalog:  http://www.ryokan.edu/files/CATALOG-Aug-2013.pdf

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Prospective students should be aware that as graduates of an unaccredited school of psychology you may face restrictions that could include difficulty in obtaining licensing in a state outside of California and difficulty in obtaining a teaching job or appointment at an accredited college or university. It may also be difficult to work as a psychologist for some federal government or other public agencies, or to be appointed to the medical staff of a hospital. Some major managed care organizations, insurance companies, or preferred provider organizations may not reimburse individuals whose degrees are from unaccredited schools. Graduates of unaccredited schools may also face limitations in their abilities to be listed in the “National Register of Health Service Providers” or to hold memberships in other organizations of psychologists. A degree program that is unaccredited or a degree from an unaccredited institution is not recognized for some employment positions including but not limited to the State of California.”
« Last Edit: October 09, 2013, 07:01:13 am by Autumn »

Epiphany

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Re: University of Santa Monica - Soul-Centered Education
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2013, 04:11:28 pm »
Legitimating efforts on the part of john roger and msia through the work of James R. Lewis and Santa Monica University http://www.culteducation.com/reference/apologist/apologist59.html

Worth digging around in http://www.culteducation.com/ for more on this.

http://www.stelling.nl/simpos/movement_of_spiritual_inner_awareness.htm

Offline educatedindian

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Re: University of Santa Monica and John Roger
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2013, 07:32:46 pm »
It's a cult masquerading as a university. In no sense is it a university as most people use the term.

1. Not accredited, except sporadically, and only within California. That means the "degree" is useless unless you plan to work within Nuage businesses.

2. "Graduate" school only.

3. "Classes" meet monthly, not weekly, and over the course of nine months, not the usual 13-16 week semesters.

4. It's so small all the faculty, including everyone who ever taught there or worked there, can be listed on half a page. One of the faculty only has a four year degree. That's unheard of in any legit school.

Most are MAs. If this school had been around for decades, that wouldn't be unusual for the older faculty. But in recent years it's unusual to teach even at a high school without an MA. At a college level you need a PhD to even be an Adjunct.

Most have PhDs from Pacifica Graduate Institute. That's a degree mill.

Many others have degrees from Peace Theological Seminary. That's a school run by MSIM. IOW the majority of faculty are either part of the cult or not very well educated and likely could not get hired elsewhere.

5. Looking at the reviews of USM on Yelp, it's quite striking. All either gave it the highest or lowest ratings.  The lowest say it's a cult, rip off, etc.

The highest ratings never say anything close to what you typically hear about graduation. ""I'll be going on to graduate school," "I'll start work soon" etc.

Instead you hear glowing claims from retired people about how it was "a gift they gave themselves." In fact the phrase kept showing up, meaning either there was one person using multiple sock puppets who was very clumsy. Or more likely, it's a phrase that's been indoctrinated into them.

Others said it "helped their own personal development." IOW, not a degree at all, but a self help enrichment type setup masquerading as a school.

6. And the enrollment application is the looniest I've ever seen. Nothing like this is even remotely on any legit university app. Chances are a legit school would face a lawsuit if it demanded what to know the personal details USM does.

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COC APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION
UNIVERSITY OF SANTA MONICA
Worldwide Center for the Study & Practice of Spiritual Psychology®
....
Please describe any personal growth-oriented seminars, workshops, or large group educational experiences in which you have participated....

a. Please describe any challenging events or situations you may have experienced (including, but not limited to, abuse, violence, chemical dependence, divorce, anxiety, or depression).
b. Have you sought support or assistance to resolve or cope with these challenges? If so, please describe and give your evaluation of the effectiveness.
c. Please discuss how you adapted or responded to these situations and how you perceive they may be influencing you now...

By my signature above, I certify that the information contained in my Psychosocial History is true, accurate, and complete. I understand that my giving false or misleading information regarding my Psychosocial History is grounds for denial of admission or dismissal from the Program after admission. I understand that I may be required to participate in an admissions interview prior to acceptance to the Program.
PSYCHOSOCIAL HISTORY
UNIVERSITY OF SANTA MONICA
Worldwide Center for the Study & Practice of Spiritual Psychology®.
...As this Program has an Emphasis in Spiritual Psychology, please briefly describe what spirituality means to you and what you hope to gain through participating in a program with an Emphasis in Spiritual Psychology.
What are the gifts and qualities that you would like to further develop through your participation in the Program?
....By my signature above, I certify that the information contained in my Spiritual Focus is true, accurate, and complete.
SPIRITUAL FOCUS
UNIVERSITY OF SANTA MONICA
Worldwide Center for the Study & Practice of Spiritual Psychology®
....How do you see USM’s Program in Spiritual Psychology assisting you in making a more meaningful contribution in your world? [Note that it is not "make a difference IN the world, but in YOUR world.]
....PURPOSES AND INTENTIONS
UNIVERSITY OF SANTA MONICA
Worldwide Center for the Study & Practice of Spiritual Psychology®
....USM’s Master’s Program in Spiritual Psychology is well known for transforming consciousness and transforming lives.

------
Yes, it's a Nuage seminar, just longer and more expensive. The admissions process itself seems determined to find the most vulnerable, not those wanting education.

Offline educatedindian

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Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2013, 08:03:30 pm »
http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20100035,00.html
September 26, 1988 Vol. 30 No. 13
 
Cult Leader John-Roger, Who Says He's Inhabited by a Divine Spirit, Stands Accused of a Campaign of Hate
By Montgomery Brower, Suzanne Adelson, Leah Feldon

Susan Whitmore finally decided that her guru, John-Roger, was no man of God the day her husband's life was threatened. In fact, the evidence had been accumulating for some time. Six months earlier, Susan's husband, Wendell Whitmore, now 42, and his twin brother, Wesley, had left John-Roger's Los Angeles-based Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness (MSIA), denouncing its founder as a fraud. Since then they had been subjected to a campaign of hate mail, vandalism and death threats. Still, Susan believed she could confront J-R, as his followers call him, and reason with him.

John-Roger agreed to meet with her in January 1984, but his message was hardly encouraging. "He told me that the vandalism was a warning and that he was personally touched that someone loved him enough to do it," says Susan, 37. "He informed me that some people wanted to kill Wendell and Wesley. He spent 10 minutes telling me how they were going to make it look like a car accident. He said that no one would be able to trace it back to him."

The Whitmores' charges, and others leveled against John-Roger, 54, by similarly disaffected disciples, have cast an ominous shadow over his international religious organization, derisively referred to as the "Cadillac of cults" by ex-members. Claiming that he is the embodiment of a divine spirit, which he calls the Mystical Traveler Consciousness, and that he is able to guide people to God, the onetime California schoolteacher has turned his tax-exempt MSIA—pronounced "messiah" by his followers—into a multimillion-dollar enterprise. Insight Seminars brought in $8 million in 1986-'87, and J-R's organizations back various media enterprises and own real estate, including a $6 million John-Roger foundation building on L.A.'s Wilshire Boulevard.

For the last four years MSIA has publicized its commitment to the betterment of humanity by holding an annual star-studded Integrity Day, at which checks for as much as $10,000 are dispensed to the favorite charities of such honorees as Mother Teresa, Desmond Tutu, Ralph Nader and director Oliver (Platoon) Stone. (None of these notables was involved with J-R's organizations, but Stone, for one, says he accepted the award because of the stature of prior winners and because it enabled him to donate the money to Medical Aid for El Salvador.) John-Roger's ministers have run productivity seminars for employees of the U.S. Social Security Administration and such major corporations as Lockheed and Chemical Bank. MSIA's celebrity ministers include Beach Boy Carl Wilson and actresses Sally Kirkland and Leigh Taylor-Young.

If former cult members have their way, J-R's elbow-rubbing days will be over. They accuse him of abusing his spiritual authority by brainwashing his followers, seducing young male staff members and intimidating dissenters. Movement dissidents say J-R used hidden listening devices at the organization's Santa Monica headquarters as a way of supporting his claim of having mind-reading powers. "What people thought was J-R's clairvoyance was just his cunning and deceitful information gathering," said one disenchanted member. Ex-followers also accuse J-R of subtly manipulating MSIA members with a kind of spiritual catch-22. "He says one thing—'Check it out, think for yourself'—and then when you do, you are told he is the only one who can validate your inner experience," says defector Susan Gray, an office manager. "Some people don't even think they can exist in the world without John-Roger."

The Whitmores, who joined MSIA during the heyday of California enlightenment in the early '70s, decided to leave in 1983. They could no longer deny their burgeoning doubts after several male staffers confessed during an informal group discussion that J-R had used spiritual threats and promises to elicit sexual favors from them. J-R's followers had been encouraged to believe that their master had taken a vow of celibacy, so the succession of attractive young men who shared his opulent Southern California house had apparently aroused little suspicion. "He always had someone sleeping in his bedroom at night, supposedly to protect his body while he was out of it," says Wesley Whitmore, now a graduate student in psychology. A MSIA spokesman denies that John-Roger ever took a vow of sexual abstinence.

Those who complied with J-R's sexual advances were reportedly promoted to positions of authority and praised for their spiritual qualities. Victor Toso, 34, now living in Minneapolis and engaged to be married, says he was not homosexual but that he consented to J-R's requests for sex because he feared being kicked off the MSIA staff. "Whenever we fell out of line, having another sexual encounter with him was sort of required to seal us back in the brotherhood," says Toso.

Even after leaving the movement, defectors hesitated to challenge J-R publicly "because we were made to be afraid," says Susan Whitmore. J-R, she says, would declare that people who questioned him had placed themselves "under the Kal [a devil-like spirit] power and its field of negativity, known as the Red Monk." Behind the voodoo jargon was a clear warning that anyone who associated with the Whitmores or other defectors risked dire consequences. According to Susan, one woman was told she had had a miscarriage because she had hugged one of the infidels.

Following the Whitmores' defection, their cars were vandalized and they received obscene letters accusing them of homosexuality and phone calls threatening their lives. In a similar case, Eve Cohen, the teenage daughter of ex-MSIA ministers Matthew and Ellen Cohen, received a letter graphically describing her father's alleged sexual acts with other men. The letter was purportedly from a girlfriend of Eve's in Los Angeles. Matthew, a mind-body therapist, calls this kind of behavior "psychopathic."

Born of Mormon parents in a small Utah coal mining town, Roger Delano Hinkins, now J-R, claims that while in a nine-day coma following a kidney-stone operation in 1963, he came to be inhabited by a spirit who identified himself only as "John the Beloved." Before that, Hinkins had lived quietly in Salt Lake City. He worked for a time as a night orderly in a hospital psychiatric ward and as a telephone operator with the police department. Then, after graduating from the University of Utah with a degree in psychology, he taught English in a Rosemead, Calif., high school. Starting with karmic coffee klatches in his own living room, where he would share his spiritual wisdom and accept $3 donations, he worked his way up to his current estate, which includes seminars offered by his worldwide organization at up to $775 a pop.

Once initiated into J-R's circle, say former disciples, followers hesitate to leave, if not for fear of reprisals, then out of reluctance to blow their chances at salvation. John-Roger has warned, after all, that the Mystical Traveler Consciousness visits earth only once every 25,000 years. Moreover, concedes defector Matthew Cohen, many of the faithful "sincerely believe in the goodness of John-Roger and what he's doing." Among them is best-selling author Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington (Picasso: Creator and Destroyer), who rejects the charges of John-Roger's critics. "These rumors have no validity," she says. "I have known John-Roger for 15 years, and there is nothing in my experience of the man to support any of these allegations. I have never once seen any evidence of him wanting to control people."

For his part, John-Roger has denied all the accusations and is reported to be traveling in Europe. When news of a possible scandal broke, his various enterprises were renamed for marketing purposes, according to a MSIA minister. No one who claims victimization at his hands has taken legal action against him, and so far as is known, no law enforcement authority is investigating. Friends and associates of his movement have been invited to "catch the vision" at a gala tribute to J-R at the Sheraton Universal outside Los Angeles in December. Meanwhile, a bill has been introduced in Congress to declare Sept. 24, Roger Delano Hinkins' birthday, National Integrity Day.

Autumn

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Re: University of Santa Monica - Soul-Centered Education
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2013, 08:10:18 pm »
Thanks Al and Piff.  That is what I thought, but I was hoping I was missing something (after listening to all the praises of the graduates, I guess!)

Piff, I had found the link you gave above and wanted to add some quotes here:  http://www.culteducation.com/reference/apologist/apologist59.html

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MSIA's Santa Monica University fits this pattern of a deviant institution created to further deviant science, presumably related to the teachings of John-Roger.

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I note, but cannot verify, critic Peter McWilliams's claim that the University of Santa Monica emerged out of John-Roger's earlier Koh-E-Nor [Mountain of Light] University as a defensive move in preparation for possible criticisms that MSIA leaders feared might appear against the guru's existing organizations in the anticipated 1988 Los Angeles Times series (McWilliams, 1994: 339, 340). Information on the school's website does verify McWilliams's statement that "[t]he University of Santa Monica has classes one weekend a month. A school year is nine weekends over a nine-month period" (McWilliams, 1994: 340), although there does appear to be an additional week in the summer for classes to meet. As of late 1993, John-Roger was the university's chancellor (Santa Barbara News-Press, 1993), and figures posted by the Department of Consumer Affairs, Board of Behavioral Sciences indicates that in 2007 it had 127 enrolled students (see Department of Consumer Affairs, 2012b).

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Moreover, one website that identifies paper-or-diploma-mills (i.e., institutions that provide worthless, academically vacuous degrees) specifically lists the "University of Santa Monica-California" among its many culprits (EmployeeScreenIQ, 2008: 22). The website includes a scathing indictment of the "Impact of Diploma Mills:"

As Al mentioned above, students do not attend to "help the world" but to "help themselves" and maybe pad their resumes a little.

I also wanted to reiterate that the teachers all are graduates of USM so this just keeps feeding on itself.


Offline educatedindian

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Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2013, 08:40:42 pm »
A very long article on Roger, the Hulnicks (who run USM) and the MSIA cult. I posted some highlights. BTW, the cult pronounces their movement "messiah."

---------
http://www.freedomofmind.com/Info/Lane.php
Loyalty to Your Soul – A Critical Analysis Book Review
 By H. Ronald Hulnick, Ph.D. and Mary R. Hulnick, Ph.D.

A Critical Analysis
 Book Review
 By David Christopher Lane, Ph.D.
 Professor of Philosophy, Mt. San Antonio College
 and Lecturer in Religious Studies, CSULB

Ron Hulnick refers to USM (University of Santa Monica) within MSIA circles (Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness) as “the Traveler’s School.” —Life 102:What to Do When Your Guru Sues You by ex-devotee Peter McWilliams

The authors of Loyalty to Your Soul: The Heart of Spiritual Psychology, H. Ronald Hulnick and Mary R. Hulnick have been associated with John-Roger Hinkins for over three decades. Part of their dedication in the frontispiece of the book is to J.R., wherein they write “and to John-Roger, who turned my Self around and helped me find direction and inspiration in my life”—Ron and “and to John-Roger whose exampleship [sic] has informed my life”—Mary.

Since both authors readily admit their allegiance to John-Roger Hinkins and his teachings, much of their “spiritual psychology” is inspired directly by J.R. This is without a doubt the most troubling thing about the book....

 In the 1990s the name was switched from Koh-E-Nor to the University of Santa Monica. While the school has been granted “Institutional Approval”

it still lacks full educational accreditation according to outside sources....

The thesis of their entire book is nicely summarized by them in the paragraph that follows, “It contains many of the principles and some of the practices currently offered in the two year Master’s degree Program in Spiritual Psychology at the University of Santa Monica, where I serve as Chief Academic Officer and Ron is President.”

Essentially, the Hulnicks and by extension USM (or, should that order be reversed?), want to bring “spirituality” (or soul) back into psychology....

It is one of the great ironies of the book that the Hulnicks’ speak repeatedly about transcending ego based actions when their own spiritual teacher has demonstrated nothing of the sort. They write about “not judging” as if making such judgments were a hindrance to a truly liberated life. For instance, the Hulnicks’ write, “You never did anything wrong but that you judged it as wrong.”

...When the Hulnicks’ spiritual guru was exposed in an extensive two part feature in the Los Angeles Times, what was J.R.’s response? Instead of owning up to his many transgressions he deployed a bizarre subterfuge where he claimed to a live audience that “Roger” (the person responsible, but not admitting anything) had died and that only his pure self remained and that “the past was past.” In addition, shortly before the Los Angeles Times story broke on August 14, 1988, John-Roger passed the keys of the Mystical Traveler over to John Morton, allegedly a one-time lover of J.R.’s and a close member of his personal staff. As Peter McWilliams recalls:

“Passing the keys to John Morton only a month before gave John-Roger one of his favorite defenses: evasive semantics. By passing the ‘keys’ to John Morton, John-Roger could answer, ‘No,’ to straightforward but perhaps embarrassing questions such as, ‘Are you the Mystical Traveler?’ . . . . It seemed as though John-Roger was denying he was ever the Traveler. It also allowed John-Roger to brush aside any questions of MSIA’s past shady dealings with the comment, ‘John Morton is in charge of MSIA; talk to him.’”

Indeed, John-Roger has had a long habit of avoiding taking responsibility for his actions. I remember confronting J.R. back in 1983 on the telephone over a laundry list of ethical transgressions. Not only did he deny that he ever did anything wrong, but he proceeded to terrorize those disciples of his that had defected.

It makes one wonder how the Hulnicks can with a straight face write an entire book about spiritual integrity when the very founder of their University has systematically avoided being held accountable for any of his actions, including such criminal activities as robbing a researcher’s home and making death threats against defectors, as extensively detailed in the mid-1980s publication, The Criminal Activities of John-Roger Hinkins.

....Furthermore, do the Hulnicks really believe that John-Roger, the founder and moral guide to USM, knows everything at all times? Because that is precisely what John-Roger has printed about himself. The 1979 edition of the MSIA Handbook for Ministers of Light states that “John-Roger Can See All. Remember, however, you might frighten a person in the beginning if you tell him John-Roger has the ability to know everything we’re thinking and doing at all times. Though the person may not believe this at first, once he does start realizing it might true, he’s apt to feel frightened.”

...the University of Santa Monica is more an extension of John-Roger’s ministry than anything else. As Peter McWilliams explains:

“All of John-Roger’s organizations have one of two functions: getting devotees for John-Roger or getting money from the devotees. USM does both. Based on the theory that if you hang around McDonald’s long enough sooner or later you’re going to have to have some fast food, if you hang around USM long enough, sooner or later you’re going to join MSIA. Every staff person and most volunteers at USM are MSIA ministers and initiates. Ron Hulnick refers to USM within MSIA circles as ‘the Traveler’s School.’”

The unsuspecting student, not well versed in John-Roger’s own peculiar blend of New Age thinking (mixing varying parts of Eckankar, Sant Mat, Theosophy, Christianity, EST, Lifespring, and whatever else captures J.R.’s interest at the moment), may enroll at the University of Santa Monica thinking that it is a purely secular school that is trying to incorporate tried and tested spiritual principles into its curriculum. But that is not the case at all, since the University of Santa Monica is, in truth, a fulcrum for John-Roger’s idiosyncratic philosophy and, as such, serves as a potential vehicle for drawing new recruits into his own religious cult, MSIA.

In other words, if the University of Santa Monica (with the Hulnicks as Co-Directors of the Institution) was truthful in its advertising (and lived up to the intentions of its founder) and in its ultimate aims, then it might more appropriately bill itself as John-Roger U.

Do incoming students at USM know that the founder of the school advertises himself as “the one who can see and know all”? Do incoming students at USM know that John-Roger founded the school to promote his own self-styled theology? Do incoming students know that the creator of their university terrorized disciples in his entourage? That he allegedly engaged in numerous criminal activities, including robbery and death threats?


...John-Roger literally terrorized the lives of those who had shown the utmost loyalty to him. According to varying sources, he sued them. He robbed their homes. He threatened to kill them. One can only wonder aloud why anyone would want to attend a school founded by a man who once told his student, Peter McWilliams, who was dying from AIDS, that he would save him from death if he agreed to put John-Roger’s name alongside his on future books. If one really wants to follow the moral injunctions of Hulnicks’ book and be loyal to one’s soul, it might be wise to read closely Peter McWilliams’ book, LIFE 102: What to Do When Your Guru Sues You, which though no longer in print is still available in used editions from Amazon and other booksellers worldwide. Peter McWilliams unmasks the charade that is J.R. and in the process clearly explains why the University of Santa Monica should be better known as the University of Spiritual Manipulation.

...Peter McWilliams on the University of Santa Monica

“In 1981, Koh-E-Nor University (John-Roger, founder and chancellor; Drs. Ron and Mary Hulnick, president and dean) was established. Koh-ENor means “mountain of light” or “mountain of wisdom” or “when you pile it this high and this deep, you get a mountain.” The instant they were established, they started handing out honorary Ph.D.s. John-Roger got the first. He got an honorary doctorate in, I forget, but you can be sure that it was in anything he wanted. Russell Bishop got one. All the guys on staff got one. When John Morton got one, some people got suspicious about the university’s academic standards: when accepting his honorary Ph.D. in (I think) nuclear physics, all John Morton could do was admire the woodgrain. (“They did a really good job finishing this. Not too shiny.”)

Suddenly, everybody at Insight had a Ph.D. The typesetters for the Insight brochures ran out of the letters P, h, and D. Facilitators actually started calling each/other “doctor”-and they weren’t kidding! Not surprisingly, Russell was the worst. If you didn’t call him “Dr. Bishop,” he didn’t answer. As far as Dr. Bishop was concerned, from now on “Russell” was what leaves did in the wind. Koh-E-Nor University opened its doors promising B.A.s, M.A.s, and Ph.D.s to one and all. “By the time you’re done with the courses, we’ll have full accreditation, and accreditation will be retroactive,” it promised. But some things never change: as of August 1994, thirteen years later, J-R’s University still isn’t accredited, and Ron and Mary still don’t like me.”

In 1988, all the John-Roger organizations began a process John-Roger called “genetic cleansing.” It was yet another prophylactic measure to protect “his babies” from the forthcoming Los Angeles Times article. All the organizations were told to change their names. This way, if the L.A. Times reported that one of the organizations had done something wrong, it wouldn’t exist anymore. Only MSIA and Insight survived the purge: they had name-recognition and therefore there was money in them there names. Every other organization changed. The John-Roger Foundation and Integrity Institute became the Institute for Individual and World Peace; PRANA Theological Seminary became Peace Theological Seminary; Atman Travel became Esprit Travel; ACE became Educare; and Koh-E-Nor University became the University of Santa Monica.

It was purely a random coincidence that one of the more respected community colleges in the state of California is called Santa Monica College. Could some people possibly think that Santa Monica College grew up and became a university? No. Nobody could make that kind of mistake. And if they did, they would get a far better education at the University of Santa Monica than they would at Santa Monica College. In connection with this name change, the Baraka Center for Holistic Health and Research became the University of Santa Monica Center for Health. The University of Santa Monica has classes one weekend a month. A school year is nine weekends over a nine-month period. There is no hope that they will ever get full accreditation. Still, the promises continue. Even the use of the word university to describe an institution that offers only two or three classes per semester is beyond me.

....In 1994, USM made a splashy announcement when they were finally accredited by the Pacific Association of Schools and Colleges (PASC). Other institutes of higher learning accredited by PASC include acupuncture schools, massage schools, herbal schools, and other New Age learning centers. Now, if the Pacific Association of Schools and Colleges can only get accredited by the U.S.

The organization that accredited USM, then, doesn’t even have an application on file to receive accreditation from the U.S. Department of Education...

I first became aware of Peter McWilliams when I saw him trying to prevent Craig Rivera (Geraldo’s younger brother) from filming John-Roger Hinkins at a book signing. The clip was repeatedly shown on Geraldo Rivera’s early 1990s nightly news television show, Now It Can Be Told, which devoted an entire episode on J.R. infamously entitled “The Cadillac of Cults.” I also appeared on that show discussing how J.R. had ransacked my home and how J.R. had manipulated hundreds of his disciples with his false claims.

....Peter explained that he had defected from MSIA and that he wanted to write a book exposing his former guru but in order to do so he needed my help. I explained that I was hesitant to put my neck out again, since the last time I wrote about J.R. I got death threats and got my home robbed. In addition, I wanted to make absolutely certain that Peter was going to put
 his name front and center on his critical analysis, since I had previously noted a tendency among certain MSIA defectors of running scared (out of fear of J.R.’s possible reprisals) when their names were going to be published as key sources.

...As Peter later explained, “I put his name on books I wrote, including Life 101, DO IT!, and You Can’t Afford the Luxury of a Negative Thought…. I published and promoted the books myself and two of them appeared on the New York Times bestseller list. I gave John-Roger every spare penny the books generated—more than 1,000,00… I did all of this not from love, but fear: I thought if I didn’t, I would die. I actually believed John-Roger’s lies that he was keeping me alive.”

....He finished his magnus opus on John-Roger, What To Do When Your Guru Sues You, in record time. It still remains one of the most insightful and funny portraits of a cult leader ever written....


THE J.R. CONTROVERSY A Critical Analysis of John-Roger Hinkins and M.S.I.A.
[Written in 198/1984 and published in Understanding Cults and Spiritual Movements]

What would you do if you learned one day that your spiritual teacher sexually harassed his male disciples and covered up his sexual affairs; a plagiarist who lifted his teachings from other traditions without due reference; a spendthrift who lived extravagantly, though he took a vow of poverty; a questionable business man who engaged in risky and possibly illegal activities; and a religious charlatan who consistently told untruths about a variety of issues?

....A Brief History of M.S.I.A.

In 1968 John-Roger Hinkins, reportedly a former police dispatcher and ex-high school teacher raised in Mormonism, started his spiritual ministry in California. He was associated with Paul Twitchell and his group, having been a mail correspondent member and a second initiate.[2] There are also reports that he was connected with other metaphysical groups, learning firsthand about meditation, light-attunement, and aura balancing,[3] which he later incorporated into his own movement.

Although Hinkins’ name appears in Twitchell’s newsletter (dated in the late 1960?s) as a convener for Twitchell sponsored meetings in Southern California, John-Roger does not see his connection with Paul Twitchell as a master/disciple or teacher/student relationship. Be that as it may, the fact remains, however, that his group and his teachings are almost exactly the same as those taught by Paul Twitchell, not even excepting particular Twitchellian nuances.[4] Likewise, some M.S.I.A. initiates recall that in the early meetings J.R. would “call in” the spirit of brother Paul Twitchell, as a master conversant in soul travel. It should also be recognized that M.S.I.A.’s organizational structure is almost parallel to Twitchell’s group with regard to initiation, discourses, and cosmology.[5]

John-Roger is known to members of M.S.I.A. as the physical manifestation of the Mystical Traveler Consciousness, an all-powerful inner spirit that guides the progress of soul travelers. (This concept, by the way, is quite similar to the Satguru in the Radhasoami tradition and the Mahanta in Twitchell’s group.) According to Roger’s account, the mantleship of the MTC was passed on to him in or around 1963.[6] During this time, Roger claims to have met Sawan Singh, the late Radhasoami Satsang Beas master who died in 1948. “J.R.,” as Hinkins is affectionately called, holds that Sawan Singh was the previous receptor of the MTC and passed on the “keys” to the Kingdom to him on the inner spiritual planes. In the beginning, however, J.R. did not recognize the luminous being as Sawan Singh. At first, he alleged to be in communication with Rebazar Tarzs, a 500 year old Tibetan monk, who, as it turns out, was a fictional character created by Paul Twitchell to hide his past associations.[7] Accordingly, it was only later when Roger saw a photograph of the Radhasoami guru that he placed the picture of Sawan Singh with the powerful entity he encountered in meditation.[8]

John-Roger’s group has grown considerably in the last ten years, and now has centers throughout the United States and in several countries across the globe. M.S.I.A. publishes its own newspaper, The Movement, and the writings of J.R., including such books as The Sound Current, A Consciousness of Wealth, and The Christ Within. Recently there took place the creation of the John-Roger Foundation, a non-profit, tax-exempt organization which supports J.R.’s numerous activities. This Foundation backs the following enterprises:

1. Public Communication: Educational programs; NOW productions; Book division; The Movement Newspaper; and Audio tape division.
2. Educational Institutions: Insight Transformational Seminars; Koh-E-Nor University; PRANA Theological Seminary and College of Philosophy.
3. Health Treatment Baraka Holistic Center for Therapy and Research.
4. Community and Public Service: Insight Service Training; Insight Service Projects; and Individual Service Projects.
5. Spiritual and Philosophical Service M.S.I.A.; Counseling; Publications

J.R. Sexually Manipulates His Disciples
Perhaps the most shocking thing to be alleged about John-Roger by a number of M.S.I.A. members is that he sexually manipulates his disciples into having a homosexual affair, claiming that it is for their best spiritual interests. According to several reports, J.R. has apparently been using his spiritual title in order to have sexual relationships with numerous male disciples.

1. M.S.I.A., under the direction of J.R., charges a yearly rate for membership. (Initiation generally can only be secured if you are a member first.) John-Roger, though he claims to have taken a vow of poverty, has used thousands of dollars of his group’s money for his own uses....

5. John-Roger, on occasion, claims psychic ability.

6. John-Roger, according to a number of disciples, has sexually manipulated several males into affairs....

Postscript (1993)

This article was originally written in 1983 after I was approached by several highly placed members of M.S.I.A. who felt betrayed by John-Roger Hinkins. Since I was somewhat friendly with J.R. (we had met on several occasions at his home about my research on Paul Twitchell, shabd yoga, and Radhasoami), I called him on the telephone to get his response to the three main allegations made against him (plagiarism, sexual manipulation, and charlatanism). J.R. did not take kindly to my questions and did not want me to do any further research on him. Indeed, after that phone conversation in the Fall of 1983 I was subjected to a series of threats, including several made against my life and the lives of my friends/informants.

The situation reached a peak the following year on October 5, 1984, when my home was ransacked and a number of my research files were purloined. Documentary evidence (outlined in a special issue of UCSM entitled “The Criminal Activities of John-Roger Hinkins”) implicates John-Roger with the Del Mar robbery, as well as engineering a smear campaign replete with death threats against his critics. Subsequently major news organizations began to investigate J.R. A number of provocative articles were published which exposed John-Roger in a negative light, including an extensive two part critique in The Los Angeles Times.

It should be noted, however, that when The J.R. Controversy first appeared I had to go to press without using the names of my informants, each of whom declined to go public because they feared for their safety. Thus, even though my critique was the first of its kind ever done on J.R. and the Movement, I was more or less a sitting duck for his retaliatory efforts. J.R. waged a systematic campaign against me by setting up a phony front organization entitled the “Coalition for Civil and Spiritual Rights.” In order to mail out his threatening letters, J.R. rented a mail box in West Los Angeles under three pseudonyms: Peter Davidson, Ph.D., Michael Hunt, and Kip Ferguson. J.R. made one devastating mistake, though, in creating his front: he personally paid and signed for the mail box, betraying in one stroke of the pen his claim that he was not aware of C.C.S.R.

After discovering J.R.’s plot (and after receiving some of the stolen materials back which contained John-Roger’s handwriting in the margins), I wrote another article which detailed his criminal activities. I also went on a couple of television programs, including the nationally syndicated Now It Can Be Told, and mentioned on air how J.R. was involved in a number of illegal dealings. Since all of my allegations were based upon extensive documentation, J.R. has never taken any legal action

Autumn

  • Guest
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2013, 01:36:46 am »
These people stick together.

Mike Brown is a spiritual life coach and he went for a year to USM:

Quote
Mike has worked as a Personal Spiritual Life Coach for the past 9
years.  He has extensive training in Crisis Intervention, Behavioral
Modification, and Conflict Resolution. 

Mike completed One Year of Master's Level work in Spiritual Psychology
at The University of Santa Monica.  He has a Bachelor’s degree in
Sociology from George Washington University.

http://www.changeyourlifecoaching.com/spiritual-life-coach-about.html

He works for Iyanla Vanzant at her Inner Visions Institute for Spiritual Development:

http://www.innervisionsworldwide.com/index.php?p=services-spirituallifecoaches-brown

Iyanla just happens to be a graduate of USM:

Quote
“Who I am is a USM graduate. I walk it, I talk it, I live it, I breathe it. If there’s anything in your heart that means something to you that you want to bring to the world because it matters to you, then USM is where you need to be. Don’t let anything stop you from coming here—not money, not time, not anything. This is not a place to fix yourself…USM is a place for you to step into the truth of who you are.”

—Iyanla Vanzant ('01)
New York Times Best-Selling Author Host: Iyanla, Fix My Life (OWN Network)

http://www.universityofsantamonica.edu/Programs.aspx

Mike Brown recently came out with a book call "You Are a Gift to the World - Blessings from My Mom" and guess who reviewed the book?

Quote
“One of the greatest testimonies of a mother’s life and care is for her son to become a loving, compassionate man. As Mike Brown shares his story, you know that his mother did a great job. This is a powerful story of a son’s loving connection to a great mother.” —Rev. Dr. Iyanla Vanzant, New York Times best-selling author of In The Meantime, founder of Inner Visions and author of Peace From Broken Pieces

Quote
“This beautiful book will touch your heart. It’s well written and a wonderful reminder about what is truly important in life.”

—H. Ronald Hulnick, Ph.D, President, University of Santa Monica, and co-author of Loyalty to Your Soul: The Heart of Spiritual Psychology

Autumn

  • Guest
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2013, 02:40:28 am »
Here are several alumni of USM (but they do have money to burn):

Quote
In the Wikipedia article about Roma Downey I noticed this fact: “Roma graduated from the University of Santa Monica with a master’s degree in Spiritual Psychology.”

The post says that Roma cannot be a "born-again Christian" as she claims because she is always discussing New Age concepts.  There are also several good links on this page:

http://davemosher.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/roma-downeys-comments-about-her-new-age-spiritual-psychology-degree-show-she-is-not-a-christian-as-she-claims-but-a-new-ager/

Note:  For those who do not know who Roma Downey is, she is an actress who appeared for years in a TV series called "Touched by an Angel".  Also, she and her husband, Mark Burnett, produced the popular TV series "The Bible".

Cindy Lora-Renard.  She is the wife of Gary Renard, who wrote "The Disappearance of the Universe" and several follow-up books.  http://www.amazon.com/The-Disappearance-Universe-Illusions-Forgiveness/dp/1401905668/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382063178&sr=8-1&keywords=disappearance+of+the+universe  In the books, his ascended masters, Arten and Pursah, explain the meaning of "A Course in Miracles" to him and many people to study "A Course in Miracles" for the first time or to study it again with new eyes. 

Quote
Cindy is also a pianist and graduate of California State University, Northridge, with a B.A. in Psychology and a Minor in Music. She has also completed her Master’s Degree in Spiritual Psychology from the University of Santa Monica. (cindylora.com)

She explains the difference between "psychology" and "spiritual psychology":

Quote
Spiritual psychology recognizes that there is a spiritual dimension and that it’s a very important part in one’s healing process, and the healing of our illusions of separation, whereas traditional psychology doesn’t delve very deeply into the spiritual dimension at all. It’s more about identifying the problem and then fixing it through external means. Spiritual psychology takes a more proactive approach and encourages people to access their own inner wisdom, and through issue resolution, accessing one’s own abilities to solve their own problems. At the University of Santa Monica where I received my degree, they would describe spiritual psychology as the study of human evolution and consciousness. I like to take it further and say that what I think human evolution really is, in the context of spiritual psychology, is it’s really awakening to who you truly are. It’s not so much evolving into something, because we’re all already perfect. It’s very similar to A Course in Miracles actually, and how it talks about identifying and owning your projections, as it’s all coming from you, not at you, and practicing forgiveness. These are all thing spiritual psychology addresses. I think there’s a really big distinction, whereas traditional psychology is not so much about empowering an individual. At least that’s what I believe.

http://theindiespiritualist.com/2010/12/27/musician-and-spiritual-psychologist-cindy-lora-renard-talks-with-the-indie-spiritualist/


Offline GG523

  • Posts: 1
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2015, 02:41:16 am »
I am a USM grad (2003).  Before I attended, I was in really bad shape.  I had just tried to commit suicide (2000) and was taking lithium and other psychotropics for my mood disorder.  The school had two masters programs: Spiritual Psychology and Counseling Psychology.  You had to do the Spiritual Psychology MA before doing the Counseling Psychology MA.  The second MA degree prepared students to be professional counselors and take the licensing board exam.  Totally legit.  I only did the Spiritual Psychology MA and by the time I graduated, I was off my meds and never went back on them.  The program helped me work through many personal issues.  The people who run USM operate with impeccable integrity.  The MA program was not easy.  Lots of writing.  Great projects (including a relationship program used not only to mend a relationship that might be in trouble (I chose my Mom), but this relationship project was the basis for teaching us statistics.  The school was regionally accredited....so what?  We all knew that before going there.  It was MY choice to go there and if I had to do it over again, I would a thousand times.  Like anything, you get out of it what you put into it.   

Obviously for those who believe this is a cult, you have already made up your mind and you will look for and find "proof" of this.  I really don't care.  It was a lovely experience.  I learned so much about spiritual psychology and about myself.  I acquired excellent life skills.  It was school the way you always wished school could be.  Nurturing.  Loving.  Yet not coddling.  Supportive.  Educational.  I have very close friends that I made while attending.  I met a woman in Mobile, AL who did the program 25 years ago.  Her and a friend flew from Mobile to Santa Monica every month for 2 years.  She is now a close friend.  When my ex partner and I started a spiritual center here in Mobile in 2006, I heard there was a woman who had attended USM and that she was coming to our center.  I stood by the door watching everyone come in from the parking lot.  When I spotted her, I said to myself, "that's her."  When she came to the door, I asked her if she had gone to USM and she said yes! 

There is something one gets that allows a brightness - a sort of light to shine in one's eyes.  It's a knowing.  And it's apparent when you see it in someone - whether they attended USM or not. 

Why people want to demonize USM is beyond me.  I am not a sheep.  I think for myself.  I wanted to do a masters in psychology and I love all things spiritual.  So when I researched and found USM, I knew that was where I wanted to go. 

I am now in a second masters program at the University of Alabama (in social work).  My first masters in Spiritual Psychology is completely complimentary to this MSW program.  I know I would not be the person I am today if I had not attended USM.  I own them my life.   And I have helped many people with the skills I learned there. 

If you think I've been brainwashed and am a cult member, that if of course your prerogative.  And I'm not going to convince you otherwise.  I know what I know and I'm a much better person for going there.  As for John-Roger, he was a strange man - a genius of sorts.  I don't judge him because he is key in developing USM.  So what if he cares about his appearance?   People have preconceived notions that "spiritual people should...."   I'd rather be spiritual than religious, because from my experience, religious people can be far worse (hypocritical, self-righteous, judgmental, etc.) than any spiritual person I have encountered.  Enlightenment is available to anyone and there are so many ways of obtaining it.  I am not fully enlightened and I don't believe we ever are because I don't think we ever know everything there is to know.  USM helped me on my journey, and I am eternally grateful for that experience. 

Offline AClockworkWhite

  • Posts: 194
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2015, 05:54:51 am »
^That couldn't be more clear proof of what they're saying about the cult activities at USM. Perfect timing and truly frightening to see after reading all that.
I came here for the popcorn and stayed for the slaying of pretenders.

Autumn

  • Guest
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2015, 01:01:32 pm »
I am a USM grad (2003).  Before I attended, I was in really bad shape.  I had just tried to commit suicide (2000) and was taking lithium and other psychotropics for my mood disorder.  The school had two masters programs: Spiritual Psychology and Counseling Psychology.  You had to do the Spiritual Psychology MA before doing the Counseling Psychology MA.  The second MA degree prepared students to be professional counselors and take the licensing board exam.  Totally legit.  I only did the Spiritual Psychology MA and by the time I graduated, I was off my meds and never went back on them.  The program helped me work through many personal issues.  The people who run USM operate with impeccable integrity.  The MA program was not easy.  Lots of writing.  Great projects (including a relationship program used not only to mend a relationship that might be in trouble (I chose my Mom), but this relationship project was the basis for teaching us statistics.  The school was regionally accredited....so what?  We all knew that before going there.  It was MY choice to go there and if I had to do it over again, I would a thousand times.  Like anything, you get out of it what you put into it.   

Obviously for those who believe this is a cult, you have already made up your mind and you will look for and find "proof" of this.  I really don't care.  It was a lovely experience.  I learned so much about spiritual psychology and about myself.  I acquired excellent life skills.  It was school the way you always wished school could be.  Nurturing.  Loving.  Yet not coddling.  Supportive.  Educational.  I have very close friends that I made while attending.  I met a woman in Mobile, AL who did the program 25 years ago.  Her and a friend flew from Mobile to Santa Monica every month for 2 years.  She is now a close friend.  When my ex partner and I started a spiritual center here in Mobile in 2006, I heard there was a woman who had attended USM and that she was coming to our center.  I stood by the door watching everyone come in from the parking lot.  When I spotted her, I said to myself, "that's her."  When she came to the door, I asked her if she had gone to USM and she said yes! 

There is something one gets that allows a brightness - a sort of light to shine in one's eyes.  It's a knowing.  And it's apparent when you see it in someone - whether they attended USM or not. 

Why people want to demonize USM is beyond me.  I am not a sheep.  I think for myself.  I wanted to do a masters in psychology and I love all things spiritual.  So when I researched and found USM, I knew that was where I wanted to go. 

I am now in a second masters program at the University of Alabama (in social work).  My first masters in Spiritual Psychology is completely complimentary to this MSW program.  I know I would not be the person I am today if I had not attended USM.  I own them my life.   And I have helped many people with the skills I learned there. 

If you think I've been brainwashed and am a cult member, that if of course your prerogative.  And I'm not going to convince you otherwise.  I know what I know and I'm a much better person for going there.  As for John-Roger, he was a strange man - a genius of sorts.  I don't judge him because he is key in developing USM.  So what if he cares about his appearance?   People have preconceived notions that "spiritual people should...."   I'd rather be spiritual than religious, because from my experience, religious people can be far worse (hypocritical, self-righteous, judgmental, etc.) than any spiritual person I have encountered.  Enlightenment is available to anyone and there are so many ways of obtaining it.  I am not fully enlightened and I don't believe we ever are because I don't think we ever know everything there is to know.  USM helped me on my journey, and I am eternally grateful for that experience.
(Bolding Mine)

Thank you, GG523, for sharing your experiences with USM.

I cannot help to feel, however, that you have been programmed well.  One word that you used stood out to me like a light beacon and that is the word "knowing".  If you watch the videos for the USM, that is the word that Mary Hulnick used in one of the somewhat phony orientation sessions they filmed.

I am very sorry that you were in "bad shape" when you started USM and I am glad that you are in a much happier place now, but I also hope that you realize that you were a prime example those who the cults prey on -- those who are in a weak and vulnerable place.

Your masters degree from USM is not recognized in Alabama, however, is it?  You say that it is "complimentary" to your now accredited program at the University of Alabama, but if it is so valuable, why do you feel the need to get another masters, one now in an accredited program?  Didn't you just waste your money as USM?  The only way you would have been licensed to be "totally legit" was if you remained in California.


Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 733
Re: John Roger, University of Santa Monica, & MSIA
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2019, 02:37:52 pm »
A very long article on Roger, the Hulnicks (who run USM) and the MSIA cult. I posted some highlights. BTW, the cult pronounces their movement "messiah."
---------
http://www.freedomofmind.com/Info/Lane.php
Loyalty to Your Soul – A Critical Analysis Book Review
 By H. Ronald Hulnick, Ph.D. and Mary R. Hulnick, Ph.D.

A Critical Analysis
 Book Review
 By David Christopher Lane, Ph.D.
 Professor of Philosophy, Mt. San Antonio College
 and Lecturer in Religious Studies, CSULB

The article has been moved to this URL: http://old.freedomofmind.com/Info/Lane.php

The article is also included in this 2015 book by David Christopher Lane:

The Skeptical Text Paperback – December 2, 2015
This book contains a series of articles which take a critical look at various religious and paranormal phenomena.

I also recommend this book by the same author:

Exposing Cults: When the Skeptical Mind Meets the Mystical
This book focuses on a number of cults and their respective leaders, including Paul Twitchell and Eckankar, John-Roger Hinkins and MSIA, Gary Olsen and MasterPath, Andrew Cohen, Sathya Sai Baba, Father Yod, and the Brotherhood of the Source presents a critical and inside look at how these groups operate. Also included our essays on UFOs, Edgar Cayce, and the politics of mysticism. This is a new edition of Professor Lane's 1993 book of the same title. Controversial and quite original.
©2016 David Christopher Lane (P)2016 David Christopher Lane