Author Topic: Andres King Cobos  (Read 11460 times)

Offline educatedindian

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Andres King Cobos
« on: November 27, 2010, 03:44:14 pm »
Started off as a member of a white hippie theater group in Mexico.
http://www.huehuecoyotl.net/andres.html
http://www.huehuecoyotl.net/Bienvenidos.html

Now a ceremony seller in Sweden, where I got a request about him.

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http://www.retreat-sweden.com/Retreat-Sweden/Andres_English.html
Andres King Cobos,  Andres is a traditional shaman, sun dancer and experienced leader of the Temazcal (sweat lodge ceremony), Andres has given many workshops on indigenous spirituality in Mexico and Europe.

Andres (Mexico) leads the sweat-lodge ceremony according to his
original Maya culture
. 3 intense, where different kind of ceremionies will take place.
The real experience of your power-animal, traditional healing, preparation/practice for
a vision quest.

Most of the rituals will take place in the forest of Rödjorna.
Andres take great care of all the participants of the sweatlodge and this beautiful ceremony will be done with no pressure on it! Its always permit to leave the sweatlodge previously.

After the 3 days course it is possible to do the individual Vision Quest in the forest of Rödjorna led by Andres. If you want more information about it please send us a mail or phone. 
Date: 
2th – 4th of september 2011

(Sweat-lodge Ceremony and other ceremonies)

5th – 7th of september 2011 (Vision Quest)

Price: 
Sweat-lodge Ceremony and other ceremonies 2750 sek (about € 275)
Vision Quest 2000 sek (about € 200)

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Interesting how he claims to be Mayan but uses the Aztec word for sweatlodge, dresses like Nahua and Huastec Indians of Mexico do, and offers Lakota vision quests and claims to be a Lakota Sundancer. Basically I'd consider him a Mexican hippie dabbler who may have himself gone to dubious people.
Sweatlodges in Mexico are different from further north. They're generally permanent structures (unlike the photos from that Swedish site where they seem to be doing a faux Lakota one), they're almost always run by women, and they are not religious ceremonies, but only for health. They're much closer to a sauna.

Some shaman...


Offline Freija

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2010, 10:04:22 pm »
375 USD for a sweat??!  :o  :o

Offline amorYcohetes

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2010, 04:53:06 am »
Quote
Sweatlodges in Mexico are different from further north. They're generally permanent structures (unlike the photos from that Swedish site where they seem to be doing a faux Lakota one), they're almost always run by women, and they are not religious ceremonies, but only for health. They're much closer to a sauna.
This is my understanding as well.  I am a maternal-child community health worker (see my intro post) and in 2003 I participated in an international midwifery conference in Oaxaca, Mexico.  From the local Zapotec midwives I got the impression that typically curanderas and parteras (female healers and midwives) use the temazcal as a therapeutic treatment for things such as physical ailments and childbirth.  It did seem more comparable to what I understand of the Scandinavian sauna than to the sweat lodge traditions of the North American tribes; but maybe with more use of healing herbs, and the fact that it is a ritual performed by a curandera, with the purpose of cleansing and healing.  This may be a lost-in-translation issue, but it seems like a stretch to call the temazcal a "sweat lodge ceremony" and of course it is not traditionally part of preparation for a "vision quest."  I also think it would be a mistake to assume the curanderas/os of the indigenous and mestizo communities of central america see themselves as "shamans."  

Another thing I recall, although I don't now see much evidence of it online, is that a group of traditional midwives from the Mexican state of Quintana Roo I think (and maybe other areas) mentioned that they were petitioning to have Mayan abdominal massage recognized (by their country?) as Mayan cultural patrimony and that as such they felt it was only appropriate that it be taught by Mayan midwives, and only to other midwives, for the purpose of use in midwifery care.  Basically they were trying to assert their collective intellectual property rights.  I'm not sure how far they got with this, but it seems like that kind of strategy could really apply to the temazcal too.  

Offline tecpaocelotl

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2010, 10:14:44 pm »
The guy is an obvious fake.


Epiphany

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2013, 04:20:25 pm »
Google translation from Danish:

Quote
Andres is a Mexican shaman, pipe carrier and sundancer. He has lived and taught among many indigenous peoples in North America and in Mexico, where they hold rituals in honor of the earth. "Mother Earth" and for peace. Consciousness and healing in the individual and among people.
 
Andres is a recognized "older" in the native Mexican sundancer tradition, led by Don Faustino Yautecatzin.

http://www.moderjordshave.dk/andres.htm


Epiphany

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2013, 04:29:19 pm »
Goggle translation from Spanish:

Quote
Origin nomadic
Before moving to the "place of the old coyotes" or Huehuecóyotl, the caravan traveled around the world 13 years, four people left Mexico in 1969 and swelled the ranks as the years passed.
"It was a youth movement that had the possibility of a new way of life, traveling together, educating ourselves together, know countries, with family at the same time and living on wheels", summarizes the Danish Huehuecóyotl member, Ria Bjerre.
Mexicans Andrew King Cobos and Alberto Ruz, and Gerda German Hansberg, met in Paris looking for the artistic movement of situationism, intellectuals seeking experienced everything is art, then went to Sweden, where a small tribe in 1973 was consolidated and left for India. Then it was 11 people.
"The idea of ??Andrew was making the trip to India, to go to our origins in religion, philosophy, Buddhism, Hinduism. Go see ", says co-founder of the ecovillage, Svante Vanbart.
Subsequent years, the tribe-called Hathi Babas or illuminated Elephants, toured East, Africa and America.
"The more we attracted people period was the period of four years in the United States", tells Alberto Ruz.
It was not until 1981 that returned 28 people in 7 trucks and decided to put down roots in Mexico and in 1982 found and settled permanently in Huehuecóyotl.

http://www.planetaazul.com.mx/site/2012/09/14/construyen-utopia-en-ecoaldea/

Epiphany

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2013, 05:21:12 pm »
His wife is Annemarie Flint Bjerre King Cobos (Ria)

http://www.huehuecoyotl.net/rie.html

http://kroniken.bjerre.net/Bjerre17.htm - scroll down to "Culture Clash" for her info

Offline Sparks

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2016, 05:01:50 am »
Andres King Cobos will soon be touring Norway

All my links have gone dead. I just found another event coming up in Norway this week. I quote the part in English:

SWEAT LODGE (TEMAZCAL)
The traditional Sweat lodge is a ritual bath ceremony of purification, common to many native Indian people in Mesoamerica and North America.
In its humid and warm darkness we remember within “our skin” and feel how much this ritual has helped and invigorated us along our life.
We invoke intimately the vivid elements of: wind, fire, water and earth…and this allow us to take conscious of our life and to be thankful to all forces that sustain us in balance and harmony.
At the sweat lodge we find in a very direct way with values of humility, purity and cleanness; our body gets read of toxins, stress and loaded feelings, so calmness and serenity may take place.
The leader of the traditional sweat lodge is invoking a rite not just of purification but of renewal: calling for the elements and the corresponding directions and symbols; working spiritually with faith, chant and praying so we may come tranquil and ready to use our will and intent for the evolution of our life.
You are in a warm darkness, around the hot stones spreading vapor because the water; you are companied by your friends and companions. You acknowledge with gratitude that you are alive, everything is alive and whole…your companions symbolize all beings on earth (everything, everybody with diverse races, languages, genders…are here included). You get clean in body and spirit, and sing and feel with gratitude, waking up the subtle intuition that everything is connected, and there is wholeness and unity.
That´s why Lakota people says “Mitacuye-Oyasin” (We Are All Related) and here in Mexico, Mesoamerica –in Nahuatl language-we say Ometeotl (ome, two; teotl, god) there where it get closer and together the Earth with the Sky.
To come to a sweat lodge could be a very simple and joyful experience. Maybe you will discover unconscious energies (visionary, solidary, traumatic…) you are carrying or pursuing. The sweat lodge will help you to walk up and deal with such energies…or maybe also confirm with serenity your commitment and tolerance to encourage your soul. Yet for sure, you come to this humid darkness to sweat out what you no longer need and you go away like a brighter sun.
Andrés King Cobos / México

Price for one weekend (Friday thru Sunday): NOK 1900. Approximately $230.

Piff

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Re: Andres King Cobos
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2016, 03:54:55 pm »
Archived copy of one of the past linked pages: https://web.archive.org/web/20140127114509/http://sjamanforbundet.no/blog/archives/385

Other links can be checked through here https://archive.org/web/