Author Topic: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements  (Read 15303 times)

Offline educatedindian

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4579
From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« on: April 01, 2009, 02:47:18 pm »
I wrote this entry for them that mentions many groups we deal with in here. Might be a bit long for some, about 18 pgs.

--------------------------

“The Radical Right and the Modern Anti-Indian/Anti-Sovereignty Movement”

   Like other minorities, American Indians began demanding their legal and political rights in far greater numbers following World War II. Native participation in the civil rights and Red Power movements centered on reasserting tribal sovereignty, that Indian tribes return to being nations with self-determination. American laws (including the Constitution) and the federal government (including the Supreme Court) repeatedly recognize that Indian tribes are nations. Tribal status is often legally defined as limited, domestic, and dependent, but few Native peoples cede that, pointing for support to the provisions of numerous treaties and international law. With the first successes at achieving Native tribal sovereignty came backlash from white racists and the rapid growth of today’s anti-Indian and anti-sovereignty movements.
   Anti-Indian groups range from white property rights groups, anti-environmentalists, anti-Indian gaming groups (who rarely oppose non-Indian gaming), business interests, the militia movement, fascists and neo-Nazis, and much of the New Age movement. Many, including militias, New Age groups, and Black supremacist groups, try to pass themselves off as Indian tribes, spreading confusion and disrupting the efforts of actual Indian tribes. Increasingly, anti-Indian groups employ professional tokens, people with claims of or actual Indian ancestry to deny their groups’ racism. But a movement seeking to deny or roll back rights or limit the property and resources of a minority racial group in favor of the dominant racial group is by definition racist.
   One of the tactics used by anti-Indian groups is to frequently adopt names including phrases like “equal rights” even while calling for the loss of rights for American Indians. Anti-sovereignty groups also use civil rights imagery, where whites are depicted as an oppressed people. Yet at the same time anti-Indian groups use openly racist appeals in pamphlets such as, "200 Million Custers." Anti-sovereignty groups also spread false racial rumors that claim American Indians do not have to work, receive free money, or are exempt from taxes. (The only actual exemption is state sales tax on reservations, which is true for both Natives and non-Natives.) Yet while claiming Natives are dependent, simultaneously anti-Indian groups denounce tribal efforts for economic self-sufficiency, such as small businesses, tourism, gaming, or leasing, as anti-white.

White Property Rights Groups and the Wise Use Movement

     From the late sixties to the early nineties anti-Indian and white property rights groups groups rose from a half dozen to more than fifty organizations. Anti-sovereignty groups often exaggerate their membership or influence, sometimes claiming to represent hundreds of thousands of people. But one estimate by the Center for World Indigenous Studies has the number of dedicated anti-Indian activists at under one hundred in sixteen states in the early 1990s. The total number of people who participated in anti-Indian meetings or protests was also estimated at less than 11,000. The number of persons who gave money or wrote letters in support of anti-Indian groups was less than 35,000. White property rights groups are strongest in the Pacific Northwest, but Indian tribes in Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Wisconsin have also faced conflict with anti-sovereignty groups.
     One of the earliest anti-Indian groups was All Citizens Equal (ACE) founded in 1970, which came from an earlier group, Montanans Opposing Discrimination (MOD), which wanted to end all reservations. While ACE has non-discrimination statements and disclaimers, its leaders associate with many racist groups. Prominent ACE members included; Keith Roberts and Del Palmers, members of Christian Identity which teaches that Jews are children of Satan and nonwhites are “mud people”; Frank Ellena, a militia and freeman supporter; and Nilah Miller of the far right Populist Party.
   The first nationwide anti-Indian network began in 1976, the Interstate Congress for Equal Rights and Responsibilities (ICERR). ICERR was initially made up mostly of non-Native landowners on Indian reservations, who frequently own more than half of former tribal land. ICERR also has many non-Native sports and commercial fishermen opposed to treaties protecting Native fishing rights. ICERR claims to speak for 450,000 people. The most frequent targets of their campaigns are the Lummi, Quinault, and Suquamish nations, but also the Blackfoot, Crow, Kootenai, and Salish. ICERR receives funding from the Joseph Coors Foundation.
The Wise Use Movement began in the late 1970s as a coalition of anti-environmentalists. It includes lobbyists for timber, energy, mining, development, fishing, and other corporations such as Exxon, Louisiana-Pacific, and Boise Cascade. Under the Reagan Administration, some of its leaders became part of the federal government. One of the leading Wise Use groups, Defenders of Property Rights (DoPR) had as board members James Watt (Interior Secretary), Ed Meese (Attorney General), failed Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork, and Republican Senator Orrin Hatch.  
     In 1984 in Washington State, Initiative 456 was proposed. Vaguely worded, the initiative aimed to restrict American Indian fishing rights. Anti-sovereignty groups succeeded in gathering over 200,000 signatures to get it on the ballot, and it narrowly passed. Anti-Indian groups hoped it would give them momentum to pass similar proposed measures in twenty-three other states. But no similar initiatives were passed in any other states, and the Washington state government began to negotiate with tribes on a government-to-government basis, something frequently not done before.
     Upstate Citizens for Equality (UCE) are white property owners who oppose Indian land claims in New York and claim over 8,200 members. Daniel Warren served as chair of the Buffalo chapter of UCE and as a Director of Coalition Against Gaming in New York (CAGNY). United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) both passed resolutions condemning UCE as a hate group.
     In Wisconsin, the anti-Indian group Protect Americans' Rights and Resources (PARR) began in 1987, led by Larry Peterson. PARR protestors harassed Ojibwe fishermen, chanting "timber niggers" and "welfare warriors.” Another group, Stop Treaty Abuse (STA), led by Dean Crist, began in 1988. STA organized violent protests, with whites assaulting Natives, issuing threats, slashing tires, running vehicles off the road, ramming boats, and firing guns. In 1989, the Milwaukee Sentinel reported anti-Indian groups formed a death squad that offered money for the assassination of two Native leaders. Crist is a supporter of David Duke, and Milwaukee skinheads of the White Patriots League attended PARR rallies in support.
     The Citizens Equal Rights Alliance (CERA) is made up of nearly 500 groups from thirteen states. Over half of CERA's organizations are business interests in gas, industrial recreation, oil, and timber. CERA focuses on lobbying Congress to weaken or end treaties.  
CERA filed a lawsuit in 2007 against Montana state officials over alleged voter fraud on the Crow reservation. The lawsuit sought to end federal voting on Indian reservations, moving ballots to off-reservation sites far from Native residents, where white racists potentially controlled access or threatened Native voters. The suit was dismissed.
      One Nation is the leading anti-Indian group in Oklahoma, made up mostly of business interests. They list their founding members as the Oklahoma Grocers Association, Oklahoma Farm Bureau, Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association, the Oklahoma Petroleum Marketers Association, the Southern Oklahoma Water Alliance, and Rusty Shaw, owner of Shaw’s Gulf, Inc.
     An advertising campaign in 2000 accused the St. Regis Mohawks at Akwesasne of drug smuggling, money laundering, and transporting undocumented immigrants. The ads were from the New York Institute for Law and Society, funded by non-Indian casino interests. Advertising was traced to an organizer for Donald Trump's campaign for president. Trump was fined $250,000 for not registering his lobby.
     Besides the Reagan Administration, other politicians have come from the anti-sovereignty movement or sought its members’ support. In the mid-1970s, Washington State Attorney General Slade Gorton lost many cases seeking to limit tribal sovereignty, but he used his notoriety to win a seat in the US Senate. Jack Metcalf began as an anti-Indian activist with both United Property Owners and Salmon/Steelhead Preservation Action for Washington Now before becoming a Washington State Senator. John Fleming wrote a Washington State Republican resolution calling for the end of reservation governments. Fleming further argued that if Natives opposed the federal government, the military should be sent in. After a nationwide outcry, the resolution was rescinded by the Washington State Republican Party. Senator Conrad Burns, a Montana Republican, introduced a bill that would exempt white reservation land owners from reservation laws. In his successful run for governor of California, Arnold Schwarzenegger appealed to anti-sovereignty groups using openly racist language, “The Indians are ripping us off.”

The New Age Movement and Fascism

     Many of the forefathers of the New Age movement were also forefathers of the modern fascist movement. New Age originators include dedicated proponents of white supremacist beliefs such as Alice Bailey, Helena Blavatsky, and Edgar Cayce. Bailey and Blavatsky’s anti-Semitism permeates their writings. Cayce argued man divides into “root races” with Aryan/whites as the most advanced. The New Age movement sometimes presents itself as apolitical, above or outside of politics, or progressive. But much of the New Age movement today is often based on ideas of the far right. Much of its leadership and membership overlap with fascism. The basic premises and practices of the New Age movement have long been criticized by Native activists and academics as inherently racist and colonialist. The damage done to sovereignty struggles for American Indians includes spreading false images of American Indians that seek to convince those sympathetic to Natives that activism is not necessary.
     Rudolf Steiner, founder of Anthroposophy and Waldorf Schools, had many disciples among the Nazi leadership, including Rudolf Hess and Heinrich Himmler. Both Steiner and many contemporary Anthroposophists and Waldorf schools teach that Blacks are trapped in a permanently childlike state, that American Indians are a senile dying race, and that Aryans/whites are the most spiritually developed. Concerned parents formed People for Legal and Non-Sectarian Schools (PLANS) suing two school districts using Waldorf teaching in violation of the First Amendment's ban on government establishment of religion. PLANS have also documented unequal treatment and racism towards minority students in Waldorf schools.
     William Dudley Pelley was an American Nazi who preached a mix of fascism and mysticism that had a direct influence on the New Age movement and the far right. Pelley promoted channeling, pyramidism, ESP, mental radio, and UFOs. He founded Galahad College to advance his spiritual ideas in 1930. In 1933 he founded the Silver Shirts, modeled on the Nazi Party, with chapters in twenty-two states and 15,000 members. Pelley called for a Christian Commonwealth with all Jews registered and only permitted to live in one city in each state. His best known writing became the Franklin Prophecy, a forgery claiming Benjamin Franklin urged Americans to exclude Jews. In 1935 he was convicted of selling worthless stock. Next year he ran for US President under the Christian Party. In 1942 he was convicted of sedition. Released in 1950, he spent the rest of his life leading the Soulcraft cult. Silver Shirt Henry Beach founded the Posse Commitatus. Silver Shirt Richard Butler led the Aryan Nation.
   An Italian fascist, Maximiani Portas, renamed herself Savitri Devi and founded an ideology, Esoteric Hitlerism. Devi directly influenced American Nazi Party founder George Lincoln Rockwell. Devi’s work gained many followers of fascist ideas among both the New Age and Green or Deep Ecology environmentalist movements. Devi connected Hitler’s belief in Aryans to Hindu history, claiming Hitler was an avatar. In 1962 Devi, Rockwell, and others founded the World Union of National Socialists, the international Nazi organization.
   Devi also influenced William Pierce, the leader of the National Alliance and author of The Turner Diaries, a work that inspired the militia movement and Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. Pierce was originally an atheist. He published a version of Devi’s books in the Nazi Party’s paper. After reading Devi he founded his own New Age religion, Cosmotheism. Some observers believed Cosmotheism to be a way to avoid taxes for Pierce and the National Alliance, or to compete with Ben Klassen's Church of the Creator.
Miguel Serrano, a Chilean diplomat, authored books claiming Hitler lived in the Hindu paradise Shambhala, or underground in Antarctica. Serrano further believe Hitler and Hindu gods would come with a fleet of UFOs to lead the forces of light (Aryans) over the forces of darkness (Jews). Serrano believed the UFOs’ victory would bring a Fourth Reich.
      Devi, Serrano, and others such as Trevor Ravenscroft brought recruits for fascism and neo Nazism from not only the New Age movement, but the black metal and industrial music scenes, science fiction fans, and pagan groups. In online forums for fascists, racists, and others on the far right such as Liberty Forum, Stormfront, and White Revolution, it is common to find neo Nazis who are also New Age believers. Many New Age and far right publications and individuals continue to work together and promote each other’s ideas. The New Age magazine Nexus promotes militia groups, anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, and propaganda from the LaRouche movement and the Nation of Islam. The best known proponent of both far right and New Age ideas today is David Ickes. Ickes claims the world is controlled by a secret conspiracy he calls The Elite, whom he identifies as Jews, Zionists, or world bankers. Ickes endorses the famous anti-Semitic forgery Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and preaches The Elite are lizard-like aliens with Jewish human shells.
     Two of Ickes’s associates are Roy Steevensz AKA Roy Littlesun and Credo Mutwa. Steevensz, who is Dutch-Indonesian, first came to public attention for falsely claiming to be a Hopi elder. Steevensz used the names of actual Hopi elders to raise money for fraudulent charities and disrupt Hopi village life before finally being banned from the Hopi reservation. Steevensz and Mutwa faced legal problems in South Africa for false claims about curing AIDS.
     In 1984 Luc Jouret and Joseph Di Mambro founded a New Age cult, the Order of the Solar Temple, which eventually numbered over 400 members in Canada, the US, and Europe. The group claimed to be in the tradition of the Knights Templar, following the teachings of Julian Origas, a former member of the Gestapo. In 1994, seventy-four members died in mass murder-suicide pacts in three separate locations. While investigating, authorities found plans to set up a terrorist network to launch attacks on the Mohawk Nation.

Militia Groups

     Most militia groups in the US are primarily concerned with being anti-federal government, especially on issues of guns and taxes. At times the militia movement overlaps with neo-Nazis, fascists, and other racists. Some groups within the militia movement falsely claim to be Indian tribes, seeking to take advantage of lack of public about tribal sovereignty and spreading confusion.
The Posse Comitatus, founded on a belief in anti-Semitism and anti-federal conspiracy theories, began to extend its hostility to tribal governments in the 1970s. In 1977 “Marshal” Slim
     Deardorff of the Posse Comitatus publicly stated its members would not submit to orders by tribal officers. By the 1990s, Deardorff had become a minister in the white supremacist World Church of the Creator.
     The Little Shell Pembina militia group is essentially the Delorme family and militia associates, along with undocumented immigrants conned into buying membership hoping to become US citizens. (This group should not to be confused with an actual recognized American Indian tribe, the Little Shell Tribe of Montana.) The original Pembinas numbered from sixty to 160 members, but are now split into three competing factions. In 2001 Ronald Delorme claimed to be hereditary chief of an Indian band and filed for federal recognition. By 2004 the Little Shell Pembinas claimed to be a sovereign tribe with title to over sixty-two million acres of land, most of North Dakota and parts of Montana, South Dakota and Manitoba.
     The Pembina “tribe” admitted anyone for a fee, whether they had Native ancestry or not. Anti-government figures joined and began to use false legal claims of sovereignty to try to avoid the law or attempt to make money. Some Pembina members offered bogus insurance. The states of Florida, Georgia, Missouri, Oregon, Ohio, New York, North Dakota, and Washington issued cease and desist orders. Some Pembinas used sovereignty claims to stop withholding taxes or paying sales tax. The Pembinas issued fake drivers licenses, registrations, and insurance cards. Pembinas tried to avoid lawsuits or prosecution by claiming courts lack jurisdiction or transferring property to the Pembina “tribe.” Members also issued phony writs, court orders, and lawsuits.
     A splinter faction of the Pembinas founded Gold-Quest International, a currency trading system that was a Ponzi scheme. Over 2,100 people were cheated out of $27.9 million. When the Securities and Exchange Commission prosecuted, Michael Reed filed a $1.7 trillion lawsuit for damages as the Pembinas’ attorney general. Other Pembinas say Reed was expelled.
     Another offshoot of the Pembinas is Universal Service Dedicated to God (USDG) a counseling service run by Reverend Audie Watson. Watson sold permits to drive, titles, registrations, and license plates. He also sold over 2,000 memberships to undocumented immigrants hoping to become US citizens. Audiji, a yoga guru in Tamarac, Florida, ran USSG with Watson. One faction of the Pembina said Ronald Delorme gave Watson the right to sell memberships and received part of the money until expelled.
      Militia members and sovereign citizens in the Pembinas include spokesman Ronald Brakke, who was part of groups promoting bogus trusts. William McNamara, the Pembinas’ head of public relations, is an actor involved with anti-government organizations the Law Research Group and the Erwin Rommel School of Law. Navin Naidu AKA Chief Judge Silver Eagle is the Pembinas’ judge and economic advisor. Naidu was the lawyer for George Speight, who led an unsuccessful coup in Fiji and was charged with treason. Naidu was deported from Fiji for falsely claiming a certificate to practice law. Clerk and tribal lawyer John Lloyd Kirk is also a militia supporter, convicted of conspiracy to possess destructive devices. For this, Kirk received prison, his second sentence after an earlier conviction for raping his daughters.
      Another figure within the Pembina militia is Allen Becker AKA Allen Aslan Heart AKA White Eagle Soaring, a white man claiming to be Ojibwe and Abenaki based on a dream he had. On his website he sells alternative medicine cures, mortgage elimination schemes, and anti-Semitic essays. Becker gives presentations to libraries and public schools in the Midwest, claiming to teach American Indian tradition.  
     Harley Reagan AKA Swiftdeer AKA Thunder Strikes alternately claims to be Cherokee or Mayan and founded a cult and militia, the Deer Tribe. Reagan issued a call for the federal government to be overthrown in 2000 should Al Gore be elected president. Reagan also calls for race war against Latino immigrants. He trains his followers in firearms and his form of martial arts he falsely claims is from American Indian traditions. The Deer Tribe also sells what they falsely claim are Cherokee ceremonies which involve group sexual assault upon initiates, and have numerous allegations of sexual abuse against them. HBO’s Real Sex program was fooled into presenting the ceremonies as legitimate in 1992, leading to a lawsuit threat from the Cherokee Nation. Reagan claims to have 5,000 members in chapters across America, Canada, and Europe.
      The Wampanoag Nation, Tribe of Grayhead, Wolf Band, is another militia group posing as an Indian tribe. Founded at an Arby’s restaurant in 2004 in Provo, Utah, the group is led by Dale Nolan Stevens. (The group should not be confused with the actual Wampanoag Nation, Tribe of Grayhead, Wolf Band, a federally recognized Indian tribe in Massachusetts.) The false Provo-based group founded the Western Arbitration Council (WAC) to file suits that harass perceived enemies. The WAC claims hundreds of millions of dollars in sham judgments against their opponents by claiming to be American Indians exempt from Utah law. Stevens was charged in 2008 with attempted lewdness with a twelve-year-old girl he claimed promised to him by her mother in exchange for energy bars.

Offline educatedindian

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4579
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2009, 02:47:52 pm »
Pt 2

Black Supremacists and Moorish Science

     Black supremacists influenced by Moorish Science claim that Blacks are the true American Indians. They further argue that American Indians are imposters or a mix of African and Chinese. They deny the existence of the slave trade across the Atlantic, claiming that Africans enslaved already lived in the Americas. In doing so they hope to get reparations or land from actual American Indian tribes. Some are closer to militia groups, often using similar tactics.
     The Washitaw Empire AKA the Washitaw Nation of Moors AKA the Washitaw de Dugdahmoundyah claims the entire territory of the Louisiana Purchase. Verdiacee Turner AKA Empress Verdiacee Tiari Washitaw Turner Goston El-Bey runs the Washitaw Empire from her apartment in Monroe, Louisiana. Turner and the Washitaws claim to be a lost tribe of Israel who arrived before 2000 BC. The Washitaws have ties to militia groups and those calling themselves constitutionalists and sovereign citizens, especially the Republic of Texas militia that had a standoff with the federal government in 1997.  In 1999, five members of the Washitaws stole over $150,000 worth of computers, clothes, and guns using phony warrants looking like cashier’s checks. The five men were going to deposit more than $1.7 billion in Puerto Rico using the phony warrants when arrested by federal agents. The group also sells false license plates, ID cards, driver’s licenses, certificates, and insurance cards, and much like other militia groups files false liens and harassing lawsuits.
      The Nuwaubians (also known by many other names) were led by Dwight York AKA Malachi York and more than forty other names. The Nuwaubians variously claim to be an Indian tribe, Baptists, Jews, or Muslims. York also claimed to be an Egyptian pharaoh and an extraterrestrial. York originally led Black Nationalists that became the Black Hebrews. By the early 1990s his group moved to Putnam County, Georgia, going through many name changes, including Egiptian Church of Karast, Holy Tabernacle Ministries, United Nuwaubian Nation of Moors, and Holy Seed Baptist Synagogue. York was convicted in 2004 of the molestation of fifteen children. The federal government seized Nuwaubian property. York tried to claim immunity both as the supposed chief of an Indian tribe and as an alleged diplomat appointed by former Liberian President Charles Taylor, himself facing war crimes charges.
      An offshoot of the Nuwaubians calls themselves the Yamassee Native American Tribe or Embassy of Mt. Ararat, led by Derrick Sanders AKA Chief Latif. (Historically there was a Yamassee tribe, but since the 18th century their descendants lived among the Seminole.) A federal court in Georgia barred them from promoting a tax fraud scheme involving false claims of being members of a fictitious tribe, or exemption from income tax.
      Other groups influenced by Moorish Science include the Binay Tribe, the Cherokee Blackfoot Cultural Circle, and the Erie Indian Mound Builders Tribe (EIMBT). The Binays began as the Black Indian Intertribal Native American Association (BIINAA) and then morphed into a mix of fundamentalism and Black Nationalist politics. The Binay are led by Jerry Monroe AKA Jerry Eaglefeather, a lay Christian minister and former hip-hop MC who claims to be Apache/Mohawk. The Cherokee Blackfoot Cultural Circle is based in New York and claims territory from Texas to Lake Superior. Their leader calls himself Shaman Red Deer the Ascending Avatar. The EIMBT is led by Erik Johnson III AKA Tecumseh Brown Eagle AKA Abdullah Mohammed. Johnson claims to have 139 members and has inserted himself in Mohawk activism against nuclear power plants, gaming issues, and the protection of sacred sites.

Alleged and Actual American Indians on the Far Right

     Anti-Indian groups realize it is useful to have professional tokens to make public statements of racism that to the naive may seem like self-criticism. Pretending to have Native ancestry among white racists is common since it gives a claim to a long history on American soil, rather than admitting descent from immigrants. President Woodrow Wilson, an avowed white supremacist, claimed distant ancestry from Pocahontas. Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and founder of the original Ku Klux Klan (KKK), had Cherokee ancestry.
Alice Jemison (Seneca) and Joseph Bruner (Creek) founded the American Indian Federation (AIF) in 1934. The AIF received funding and influence from fascist groups the German-American Bund and the Silver Shirts. AIF members work swastikas on Plains-Indian-style headdresses and gave speeches promoting anti Semitic conspiracy theories. Scholars are still divided as to whether the AIF was truly fascist in its goals or made an alliance of convenience to oppose Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. The AIF favored assimilation for American Indians and the end of reservations. Some historians blame the AIF for causing the American government policy, Termination, which removed reservations for 109 tribes and drove tribal members into even worse poverty.
     The John Birch Society (JBS) best known for its conspiracy theories, anti-Semitism, and opposition to the civil rights movement, worked with the vigilante group Guardians of the Oglala Nation (GOON) and Lakota medicine man Johnson Holy Rock. During the Wounded Knee II standoff in 1973, the JBS spread rumors that the American Indian Movement were Communists and sponsored a speaking tour in 1975 of a government informer who spied upon AIM, Douglass Durham. Durham and the JBS also libeled AIM as murderers and rapists out to start a race war. The JBS intervened again in the 1990s in disputes between Indian tribes in New York and white renters on reservation lands. The JBS featured Oneida Tribal Chairman Ray Halbritter in its magazine, calling him "Land-Grabbin' Ray." A billboard on a highway near the Oneida reservation featured a rifle and a threat, "Ray, come and get your rent."
     Rita Ann Suntz AKA Pale Moon Princess or Princess Pale Moon variously claims to be Cherokee, Cheyenne, or Choctaw. Heading the American Indian Heritage Foundation at www.indians.org, neither the foundation nor the website benefit American Indians nor represent them. No evidence support Suntz’s claim to be Native, but she has raised millions, though she is best known for sending tainted food to Alaskan Natives in 1998. Suntz sang the national anthem at two Republican conventions. Her son Robert Suntz, is a member of the militia group the Little Shell Pembinas, where he issues driver's licenses and plates.
     Roland Morris, an Ojibwe, is quite prominent in the anti-Indian movement. Morris was elected to the board of Citizens Equal Rights Alliance (CERA) and chairman of All Citizens Equal (ACE) as part of a campaign to overcome their association with Christian Identity and other racist groups. Morris ran for the Montana state legislature but lost.
     Weylin Wiles AKA Chief Weylin Lighteagle claims leadership of a small group of unenrolled Natives in Florida. Wiles spreads anti-Semitic conspiracy theories but claims to be of mixed Jewish and Cherokee ancestry. Wiles also sells false versions of Native ceremonies with a white woman claiming to be a shaman, Scarlet Kinney.
     Clifford Alford claims to be a Cherokee shaman, a Templar knight, a Wiccan sorcerer, and a CIA operative. Alford is also the founder and leader of the New Mexico Border Watch, associated with white supremacist and anti-immigrant vigilante group the Minutemen. Alford also taught law enforcement training on Satanism and how to confront suspected occultists.  .
     David Yeagley claims to be part Comanche. Far right activist David Horowitz recruited him to write for the online tabloid FrontPageMag. Yeagley is a speaker for the John Birch Society and also works with; the anti-Indian group One Nation; two eugenics groups, American Renaissance and Gene Expression; neo Nazi groups the White Boy Society, the National Alliance, the neo-Nazi skinhead group Stormfront, and white nationalist and anti-immigrant group VDARE. Yeagley, sponsored by the Shah of Iran’s family, calls for Iranians to give up Islam and ally with whites and Jews against Arabs, atheists, Blacks, Latinos, and Muslims. Yeagley also led a failed campaign against Comanche actor Rudy Youngblood and his family after hearing rumors Youngblood was part Black. Yeagley has called for the mass murder of Iraqi children and undocumented immigrants and compared President Obama and Janet Jackson to apes.
      Yeagley coauthored several articles with Barbara Lindsay, the director of One Nation. Lindsay claims one-eighth Cherokee ancestry, but is not part of any Indian tribe. Lindsay was expelled from a Cherokee heritage group for her membership in One Nation. Formerly Lindsay headed United Property Owners, based in Washington State. Both Lindsay and Yeagley took part in an anti-indigenous documentary in Europe, Prisoners of the Past, which was withdrawn after the public outcry over its racism.
     At one time a civil rights activist and opponent of pseudo-Indian mascots in sports teams, Betty Ann Gross reversed her previous positions and today is a close supporter of Yeagley’s. In February 2008, Gross tried to set up a misleadingly named Dakota Civil Rights Office to oppose Blacks and immigrants coming to the state, but failed due to opposition from Dakota activist Barbara Duggan and others.
 
Al Carroll

Further Reading
Anti-Defamation League, www.adl.org, accessed 3-25-09.
Susy Buchanan, “Sacred Orgasm,” Phoenix New Times,
http://phoenixnewtimes.com./2002-06-13/news/sacred-orgasm, accessed 3-25-09.
Center for World Indigenous Studies, http://cwis.org, accessed 3-25-09.
Coalition to End Racial Targeting American Indian Nations (CERTAIN) http://www.certain-natl.org/index1.html accessed 3-25-09.
Zoltan Grossman, When Hate Groups Come to Town, Atlanta: Center for Democratic Renewal, 1992.
Elizabeth Lynn Hunt, Anti-Indianism in Modern America, Urban: University of Illinois Press, 2001.
Montana Human Rights Network, www.mhrn.org, accessed 3-25-09.
New Age Frauds Plastic Shamans, www.newagefraud.org, accessed 3-25-09.
Ross Institute for the Study of Destructive Cults, Controversial Groups and Movements
www.rickross.com, accessed 3-25-09.
Southern Poverty Law Center, www.splcenter.org, accessed 3-25-09.

Offline Defend the Sacred

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3407
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2009, 10:34:54 pm »
Cool. Is this for a print Encyclopedia or an online one?

Putting my copyeditor's hat on:

The best known proponent of both far right and New Age ideas today is David Ickes. Ickes claims the world is controlled by a secret conspiracy he calls The Elite, whom he identifies as Jews, Zionists, or world bankers. Ickes endorses the famous anti-Semitic forgery Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and preaches The Elite are lizard-like aliens with Jewish human shells.
     Two of Ickes’s associates are Roy Steevensz AKA Roy Littlesun and Credo Mutwa. Steevensz, who is Dutch-Indonesian, first came to public attention for falsely claiming to be a Hopi elder. [emphasis mine - KPN

I believe it's "Icke" with no "s". I'm trying to remember who the English humorist is who did a story on him, where he concluded, "He really believes that the royal family, and the ruling elite, are lizard people. He really believes it." Heh.  :o

Offline BlackWolf

  • Posts: 504
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2009, 01:33:40 am »
Quote
Some groups within the militia movement falsely claim to be Indian tribes, seeking to take advantage of lack of public about tribal sovereignty and spreading confusion.

Quote
Pretending to have Native ancestry among white racists is common since it gives a claim to a long history on American soil, rather than admitting descent from immigrants. President Woodrow Wilson, an avowed white supremacist, claimed distant ancestry from Pocahontas. Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and founder of the original Ku Klux Klan (KKK), had Cherokee ancestry.


Thankyou EducatedIndian for this truely informative information.  I did not realize this was taken place on such a large scale, and of all the conncections between the various groups.  I always did wonder about the apperence of so many bogus tribes in such a small amount of time.  And all of these bogus tribes and groups do nothing but stir up confusion in the eyes of the general public ( who know nothing of Indians to begin with ) and at the same time make True Indain Tribes look like the backward Hollywood Stereotypical people that have always been potrayed as being Indian.  I know its something I'm going to look more into now.

Offline BlackWolf

  • Posts: 504
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2009, 05:36:22 am »

Quote
He has been outspoken in his criticism of the movement to eliminate sports mascots derived from Indigenous peoples[9][10] as well as the opponents of Columbus Day.[11]

I got this from that guy mentioed above, David Yeagley's Wikipedia page.  Granted, that not all Indians are outspoken about the Mascot Issue or go to protest Columbus.  But  this guy seems to go out of his way to criticize his fellow Indians ( If he is Indian ) in standing up for Indian issues. 

Quote
Yeagley, who also writes columns on political subjects, presents himself as "the only voice of conservative American Indian thought

And this is kind of a sweeping statement.  What does he mean by that? He is the "only".  Meaning, your either with him or againts him. 

There also seems to be questions about whether or not his enrollment status with the Comanches Nation is based on adoption or Comanche BQ.

Quote
No race or ethnicity wants to see its womenfolk running after foreigners. It is the most base betrayal.

This statement he makes here makes no sense at all.  If he is who he says he is, then would not "he himself" be the product of a mixed marriage/union between different races and ethnicities?  He seems like a very bizare character.


Offline educatedindian

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4579
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2009, 09:00:01 am »
It's for a print encyclopedia, though some libraries may put it into electronic editions. The editors should catch my missspelling.

Weird doesn't begin to describe Yeagley. Horowitz first promoted him because he wanted someone claiming to be NDN slamming actual NDNs on the mascot issue.I have a blog that tracks his activities and between myself, Brent Michael Davids, Bevery Isaacs, Barbara Duggan and others, we manage to neutralize a lot of the damage he does.

www.davidyeagley.org

Davids' blog.
www.badeagle.org

Online Sparks

  • Posts: 760
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2017, 12:36:23 am »
Weird doesn't begin to describe Yeagley. […] I have a blog that tracks his activities and between myself, Brent Michael Davids, Bevery Isaacs, Barbara Duggan and others, we manage to neutralize a lot of the damage he does.

www.davidyeagley.org

Davids' blog. www.badeagle.org

These blogs are not there any more. Are they gone for ever, or just changed their URL's?

Offline Diana

  • Posts: 370
  • I Love YaBB 2!
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2017, 12:48:17 am »
Hi Sparks, I imagine they're gone because Yeagley is dead. I think he died about 4 years ago....??

Weird doesn't begin to describe Yeagley. […] I have a blog that tracks his activities and between myself, Brent Michael Davids, Bevery Isaacs, Barbara Duggan and others, we manage to neutralize a lot of the damage he does.

www.davidyeagley.org

Davids' blog. www.badeagle.org

These blogs are not there any more. Are they gone for ever, or just changed their URL's?

Offline educatedindian

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4579
Re: From the Encyclopedia of American Reform Movements
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2017, 04:33:11 pm »
Brent Michael Davids and I both stopped doing our blogs many years ago. I think my last writing on him was in 2009. Yeagley had long lost any influence or ability to do any damage he once had. Yeagley was so broke, unable to get writing assignments or public appearances from conservative groups anymore, that he tried suing us, as well as the LA Times, U Nebraska Press, even Amazon and Google. All the suits were thrown out.

When he passed away, we let the blogs die. Only some white supremacists marked his passing. His sister agreed to let his website die too. There's not much else on him online.