General > Frauds

Official Nemenhah Online College of Healing

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educatedindian:
That band is a pay to pray scam alright. You have to pay to join and to continue to be a member.

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http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096415228
Barnett, a special projects officer at the Native American Health Center in Oakland, was referring to an e-mail he received by mistake, intended for a company called Native American Nutritionals. From their site he had been lead to another, thenativehealer.com.

There, he found an offer of ''spiritual adoption'' for a $90 donation and $5 in monthly payments by the Nemenhah Band and Native American Traditional Organization of the Oklevueha Native American Church of Sanpete.

The group is an ''independent band'' which offers enrollment in an online college where people can pay to qualify as medicine men or women, healers and Native practitioners, according to their Web site.

Courses range from online lessons in smudging to a six-hour ''Unipi Ceremony Practicum,'' which requires a mentor to ''come to your lodge.''

Each member receives a ''ministerial card'' that is valid as long as they are progressing and ''making regular offerings,'' according to the Web site.

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Another less than credible pair of healers from that "band". Two yuppies playing at being NDN.

http://www.iggygarcia.com/About%20Us.html
"Iggy and Suzi Garcia are  members of the Nemenhah Band and Native American Traditional Organization (NAC) is certified and in good standing of the affore said Native American Church and are Shahaptian Guide Medicine Man and woman.  And as such is authorized to perform all the ordinances pertaining to their calling, including the use of Plants, Animals, Stones, Feathers, and so forth in rites and ceremonies which do pertain to the Tents of the Scared Shahaptian Healing way as restored to the Nemenhah Band by Wyakin and as set forth in the constitution of the Band.  We are members of Journeys way Lodge in Columbus, Ohio.  Sweat lodge Itsipi Leader, Intuitive Life Coaches™, Drum Healing, Drum Circles, Remote Healing, Body Energy Work, Inca Meditation, and Open Chair Gestalt."

Not sure about the reliability of this site, but it says the Nemenhah are from the Book of Mormon.
http://www.greaterthings.com/Records/Nemenhah/index.html
"Records of the Nemenhah
Alleged account of a peaceful people who sailed north with Hagoth, who was mentioned in the Book of Mormon."

This is disturbing. They hope to use their claims to be Native to avoid prosecution if their products don't work or harm people.

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http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/archive.cgi?read=83663
Rumor Mill News Reading Room Archive

DON'T FEAR CODEX - THE NEMENHAH NATIVE AMERICAN CLAN CAN ADOPT YOU

Posted By: Rayelan <Send E-Mail>
Date: Thursday, 29 December 2005, 10:34 p.m.

In Response To: SAVE DR HULDA CLARK!!! (Freedom4ever) I don't fully understand all of this, but I am going to do my best to explain it as far I understand it.

I'm part Cherokee and I am going to do what I must to become part of the Cherokee nation or of a cousin clan like the Nemenhah.

Cloudpiler, a grandson of Chief Joseph, the great Nez Perce Chief and others who are part of Native American Nutritionals became recognized Native American Practitioners by seeking adoption into the Nemenhah Band and Native American Traditional Organization.

As Shahaptian Guides, they gained a valuable connection with the Holistic Principle of Native American Healing... as well as a legal safety net where natural healing is concerned.

You can read more about this on their webpage... the long and short of it goes like this:

By becoming Native American Practitioners, they (or YOU or anyone who gets adopted) qualify under the protections and exemptions provided by the Federal Native American Free Exercise of Religion Act of 1993 (NAFERA).

This Act of Congress was passed almost unanimously by both houses of legislature in Washington, D.C. The Act protects the Spiritual Path of Native Americans and their Traditional Spiritual Leaders.

NAFERA dictates that "no laws or statutes may be enacted that tend to regulate the establishment of Native American Religions or the free exercise thereof."

This makes exclusive licensure laws that have either been passed by, or are presently on the dockets of every state legislature in the country to fall under the NAFERA exemption. It also applies to CAFTA and other trade regulatory statutes!!

The bottom line is this: Native American Practitioners are exempt by definition from such regulatory statutes.

Their Life Path understands that, for the Healer, the relief of suffering comes into spiritual orientation. In fact, Native American Practitioners make no distinction beween Healing and religion!!

Someone needs to tell Dr. Clark that there IS another path she can "adopt".

Here's the link. Please take the time to read more. If you are a healer, then you are practicing your own spirituality. NAFERA gives you the protection you may soon need to continue to use "natural" substances instead of buying pseudo-cures from Big Pharma.

NEMENHAH HOME PAGE

Defense works!!

educatedindian:
Those so called "elders" are quite a bunch. Mooney, Jasmine Hisha, and "Cloudpiler" have already had threads on them.

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"Hon. Benjamin Zvenia"-

http://educate-yourself.org/dc/EFFtargetsuggestions15jan04.shtml
Our own Doc von Peters is still struggling to stay above water economically after the CIA sent Benjamin Zvenia to get onto his Naturopathic College's administrative staff and rob the school blind and otherwise try, on behalf of his handlers, to make Doc's life a living hell. Let's focus on Benjamin, as he still won't let up even though the college is finished. FYI, Benny's got several convictions for crooked real estate deals, did 5 years in a Nevada prison for practicing medicine without a license (okay, I know 99.99% of MDs in the US never get beyond the 'practice' stage, anyway and many of those medical murderers in Nevada should probably have been prison bitches along with Ben ;-), got caught writing bad checks in Nevada and North Carolina and had been booked on attempted theft charges. Doc just found this out. No doubt Benny was given a clean slate and a fabulous resume by his CIA handlers when he was thrown at that school in this fake gov't's long term War on Healers. They probably recruited him in prison. Send Ben your tough love if you feel inclined. We do. Benny typifies how the CIA runs its sabotage campaigns against high-profile people of character like the Doc.

Also http://www.lightharmonics.com/oiucm/speaker_bios/zvenia.htm.
Basically he's done premed and altmed courses before he became a lawyer. Says he's Native (judging by the groups he joins) but no mention of what tribe.

Basically he teaches the "band" members how to use NARFA to avoid prosecution.

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They claim Robert Sunhawk as an elder, but this site says he passed on over a dozen years ago.

http://www.robertsunhawk.com/

Notice that the site also mentions his Cherokee ancestry is distant. Also the Plains warbonnet on an alleged Cherokee medicine man who also sold herbal meds.

This profile shows a Grizzly Adams lookalike as Sunhawk.
http://www.thenativehealer.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=192

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Semisi (Fears No Wind) Tukuafu

http://www.spock.com/Semisi-Tukuafu-NuO6t1NXI
"I am 38.... a Elua Lomilomi Healer (Ancient Hawaiian healing method). I do Massage for clients in the evening supporting my family, and am a member of a Reggae band called Soul Redemption. I play the Trombone (a Brass instrument) in the band and sing background vocals."

The healing method he claims only shows up online in sites that he's on.

Many sites says that lomilomi is just...massage.

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 His Excellency Charles McWilliams-Apparently his title came from the Pope. He runs a health center in the Caribbean island of St Kitts.
http://www.thestkittsnevisobserver.com/jun1308/news8a.htm

So why is one of the "Pope's knights" from St Kitts part of an alleged Native band in Utah?

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Hon. Norbert Johnson- retired, with the same law firm as Zvenia.

Why either Johnson or Zvenia are called "elders" isn't clear. In fact it's not clear for any of them.

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Hon. Benjamin Anguiera- actually spelled Angueira. Runs a seminary in Puerto Rico whose address is a PO box!

http://www.waucglobalaccreditation.org/universities.htm
Universidad y Seminario Apostolico de las Americas Inc - Dr. Benjamin Angueira, President, P.O. Box 3375 San Juan Puerto Rico 00938, university@caribe.net

And that accreditation is not too impressive. Basically they disclaim any responsibility for the colleges listed, and any college can join for 500 bucks.

He also runs Airside Financial Corp in Miami.
http://airsidefinancial.com/

And is listed as an "Ambassador to the Dominion of Melchizidek"! I swear I'm not making that up.
 http://www.melchizedek.com/ambassadors.htm
"Benjamin Angueira
(Caribbean)"

Hey, Caribbean is not a country...

Honorable Dr. Pinto- is also one of the Pope's knights along with McWilliams and Anguiera. 

What can you say....not one of them comes anywhere close to being an elder. Zvenia might be the only NDN in the bunch. Not a single one of them even mentions a tribe. And none of them are actually medicine people.

Perhaps the authorities need to be reminded that NARFA is only supposed to protect NDNs, not imposters.

Kathryn:
Sorry, but I'm still laughing at "Fears No Wind." 

(See http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=1644.msg12084 )

educatedindian:
A follower of the Nemenha is refusing to allow their child to be treated for cancer.

Also a reporter would like to speak with anyone of those who commented on this thread, or anyone who knows more about Nemenha and its alleged healers. IM me and I'll pass along contacts.

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http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/health/44568447.html?elr=KArks:DCiUHc3E7_V_nDaycUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUUr
Daniel Hauser has what doctors consider one of the most curable types of cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma.

But the 13-year-old from Sleepy Eye, Minn. and his parents don't want him to have chemotherapy and radiation, the standard treatments. For the past three months, they have ignored the advice of his cancer specialists and turned to natural therapies, such as herbs and vitamins, instead.

Now they are going to court to defend their decision.

James Olson, the Brown County attorney, has filed a petition accusing Daniel's parents, Colleen and Anthony Hauser, of child neglect and endangerment, and he has asked a judge in New Ulm to order the boy into treatment.

The case, which goes to trial this morning, has quickly turned into a cause celebre in the world of alternative medicine. Last week, supporters packed the courthouse in New Ulm, Minn., for a pretrial hearing, and both sides are bracing for an even a bigger crowd today.

"You can't imagine what kind of outpouring we've gotten here," said Calvin Johnson, a Mankato attorney who is representing Daniel's parents. "There's a lot of feeling on this subject."

Daniel, one of eight children, has asserted that treatment would violate his religious beliefs. The teenager filed an affidavit saying that he is a medicine man and church elder in the Nemenhah, an American Indian religious organization that his parents joined 18 years ago (though they don't claim to be Indians).

"I am opposed to chemotherapy because it is self-destructive and poisonous," he told the court. "I want to live a virtuous life, in the eyes of my creator, not just a long life." He also filed a "spiritual path declaration" that said: "I am a medicine man. Some times we teach, and some times we perform. Now, I am doing both. I will lead by example."
Johnson said Daniel's case has touched a nerve because the state wants to impose a potentially dangerous treatment that neither the boy nor his family believe in. "Why does a doctor have the right to come in with the power of the state and the county attorney by his side and say 'take my medicine?' " he said.

But Olson, the county attorney, says he is trying to protect a child from a decision that could cost him his life.

"If he were 18 years old and made the decision that his parents are making for him, we would not be in court," Olson said. "Since the boy just turned 13 in March, I felt the judge needs to take a look at this and make a decision."

The family declined a request for an interview Thursday.

Danny, as he is known, was first found to have cancer in late January, and his doctors recommended six rounds of chemotherapy and radiation, according to court papers. The disease -- a cancer of the immune cells -- has a 95 percent survival rate for his age group with treatment, according to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

But after one round of chemotherapy, Daniel became so sick that his parents refused to send him for a second treatment. They switched him to an alternative regime of complementary medicine, including dietary changes and "ionized water," Johnson said.

In the meantime, the Hausers asked for second and third opinions from the Mayo Clinic and University of Minnesota. In both cases, the cancer specialists recommended chemotherapy and radiation, said Olson, the county attorney. Without treatment, he said, he was told the boy could die. In April, he filed a petition asking the court to force treatment.

Olson's petition says, in part: "Both the Mayo and Children's doctors have told the parents that Daniel has a 90 percent chance of being cured with standard chemotherapy and radiation, and this would decrease significantly to 50 percent or less if the tumor is allowed to re-grow and develops resistance to chemotherapy.''

"There's a fine line between parental rights to do what parents feel [is] in the best interest of their children, and the state's right," Olson said Thursday. "In this case, we've claimed we have a compelling state interest in protecting this young man."
James S. Turner, a Washington lawyer and natural health advocate, has joined the battle on the Hausers' side.

"Consumers do have the right to choose what kind of approach they want to take on any health question, that's our argument," said Turner, who was one of Ralph Nader's original Nader's Raiders, and now chairs a group called Citizens for Health.

Philip Elbert, a St. Peter attorney who is representing Daniel, agrees. "If a parent is given a choice of two rational choices, you can't just say 'I don't like that choice,'" he said. "We may not agree with the decision, but it's not our decision to make."

The parents have said they were not ruling out chemotherapy completely, and would try it again if the cancer begins to grow, according to court documents. For now, Daniel appears to be doing well, said Johnson.

Olson says he would not have gone to court if the boy had a grim prognosis, "and the parents made a decision that they don't want to put him through chemotherapy." But in this case, he said, "the doctors are telling us that it's 90 percent curable."

In his court papers, though, Daniel sounds defiant. "I claim this, as my right, that no one: No government, No big Brother, No Tribe, No other human being may interfere with my Spiritual Path and my consciousness."

NanticokePiney:
  A "medicine man" at the age of 13???? This is nothing more than a cult that is dangerous to the health and welfare of it's members and because of this cult a child will lose his life. This is upsetting. 

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