Author Topic: Hello from Ta'Na'Si  (Read 10637 times)

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« on: January 14, 2017, 09:39:52 am »
No really, I live in Tennessee near Ta'Na'Si, where the old Overhill Village used to be.

Hello, my name is Jeff. Long time lurker (without being signed up) and signed up last week to post. I am Siouan-Algonquian. My father, grandfather etc.. were Euchee. My grandmother and her family Eastern Shawnee. Another grandfather Catawba. Cherokee grandmother. Due to a lot of moving around that particular great grandmother who was Cherokee, ended up moving to Euchee Town near Little Euchee Creek not far from Coweta Town, they lived there before the Town was in New Alabama,  her sons left Georgia and moved to Alabama where they purchased 86 acre farms, they were used in the original petition for Federal Recognition for the Poarch, as part of the history and they are correct, they did move down to Alabama. My 4th great grandmother was Susannah Sookie McDaniel. Her granddaughter who died in 1910, my 3rd great grandmother, Mariah McDaniel, is buried in our family cemetery, along with a lot of other different family members, native Americans. My great, great uncle was Lower Town Mic'co Andrew Jackson McDaniel and his brother James ended up staying in Arkansas after the Civil War, and fighting under Stand Watie. They were originally from Amherst and Halifax, Virginia but ended up in Georgia. Her last husband who is not my grandfather was an Ocoee from Nash County, North Carolina. Meaning he was also Catawba. We have family members in the Poarch, in the Shawnee Tribe of Miami, Ok. In the Eastern Band as well as the First Families out of Tahlequah. I am acquainted with both Shawnee Tribal Historian (And head of economic development) Greg Pitcher, and Cherokee Historian Gene Norris as well as some other tribal historians. The old lower Euchee path runs directly through our family property in Georgia, where my family has lived since the 1780's, and my paternal grandparents even longer, and where most of the roads are named after us. I am related to the Wilde's, Europeans, of the Maximilian Wilde's family of the last "Georgia Indian Massacre" by the men of Chief Billy Bowlegs. Our grandparents, all buried in our family cemeteries (Historical) fought with the First Georgia Division, Militia, in the Creek Civil War, as well as all three Seminole Wars and on forward, Confederate Army, etc. I am 54, I was raised by a man, my grandfather, who lived in the same house on the same farm with his grandparents who went through the forced Relocation as children. My 3rd great grandmother was born in 1829 and died in 1910, my 3rd great grandfather was born in 1826 and died in 1920. Four generations of the same Indian family lived on the same farm at the same time. When my 3rd great grandfather who had gone through the forced relocation died, the man who raised me was 15, knew him well. So I know him well.  We are not that far removed from that history.  My great great grandfather was the last Euchee speaker in the family, but I am trying to learn it at least conversationally. This last part I dont care to talk about but am going to, primarily because of Ward Churchill's story and outcome. I do not really know his story, but I can legitimately state that I am related to some of Richard Tyners family. Richard Tyner had a daughter with his second wife who married one of the  Purcells. Matilda Purcell (Creek) daughter Charity Purcell married my grandfathers uncle and she has my last name, and is buried in our family cemetery and the Purcells are my cousins today because of it. I dont like mentioning it because he did it, it appears to me, to claim descendancy from a Chief or something. I dont know the details to tell you the truth. There is a lot more to our American Indian family than that, and although I am eligible to be enrolled in a couple of different Tribes, Shawnee, Absentee Shawnee (My great, great grandmother Martha McDaniel is on the 1937 Citizen Potawatomie rolls but died in 1937 and another older grandparent is on the 1937 Shawnee rolls), it isn't something I am jumping through hoops to do at the moment. Hopefully this doesnt make someone mad, but I am Indian by virtue of being born an Indian. And an Indian-Scot. I dont feel I need to be a Government Approved Grade "A" Indian to call myself and identify as an Indian. I'm an American Indian, Native American, period.

The reason I signed up to comment was because I thought it would be prudent to let some people here know about our organization in the event someone ran across our header and came here to ask "You ever heard of this group"? I would rather not be called out as some sort of fraud because someone did not know who we are. So I am here to tell you who we are in advance, provide any documentation you might like to see, including photographs, because we have photographs of most of our ancestors including my third great grandmother who went through the Forced Relocation, and refer you to any tribal historian I need to. We are real Indians. Not new age, not pretendians, dont have fake names. Don't make up fake names for our ancestors. (Because we know who they are and visit their graves regularly). When your name is John and you have lived through the Forced Relocation, fought in two Militia-Indians Wars, the Civil War and drove in a car and died after Airplane Flight was invented. Then John will do. Names like Princess Unicorn Stardust doesnt work for us.

First, at no time in our families history have we ever "not" been Indian. We are not a group that all of a sudden found out that we had a Cherokee 9th great grandmother and decided we were Indians. We are in the same places we have been in for well over 300 years and the last place in Georgia for 230. We've been there and we are still there. We practice the practices and traditions our grandparents practiced, and we have had the same family reunions in honor of our Indian ancestors for over 100 years. Our families were at Fort Hawkins, and we (Including me) are related to Benjamin Hawkins descendents. They are our cousins. We teach about our family history, we hold annual get togethers were we teach about our ancestral history and going back to the Woodland and all the way back to the Paleo periods. One of my cousins handmakes his own clothes, bows, arrows, stone and flint points, knives, and is an expert on early historic, woodland and paleo period Indians in the Southeast and also teaches it, he started from his grandfather 50 years ago. We want to insure that our families, especially our youth, have the correct history. We want them to know that our ancestors didnt wear war bonnets in Georgia, but rather furs. That a Chinese made Dreamcatcher doesnt count as an Indian relic. That "not everyone was a Cherokee'. And the difference between Tribal Governments and language groups. Where our family lived, six different languages were spoken at one time, in 1820, including Euchee. Basically, we are doing what both Archaeologists and Tribal leaders in the 1990's called, and is still called "Ethnic Revivalism". And we are trying to get it right.

So who we are, are "The Society of Ohoopee River Indians". We are currently made up of 47 families and have been around going on four years. You may not have heard of us because entry into our group has some strict requirements. No one comes in our group that cannot prove and document their American Indian ancestry. We made it this way not to be above anyone, but to maintain the integrity of our organization. We are not a Tribe, nor are we a band and we do not claim to be. What we are, are families and descendents of members of the old Lower Creek Nation, Creek Confederacy, and the old Cherokee Nation as well as some other groups who eventually migrated south. The Purcell's, of the Lumber River Scots for example, back when it was Drowning Creek. The McDaniel's who were caught up in Dunmore's War, ended up at Fort Christianna, lived and were born in Halifax and Amherst, lived in South Carolina and finally in Georgia before 1800. Meigs, Jarriel's, Rewis's, Padgett's, Rogers, Adairs and so forth. No official documentation, no membership. It is harder to become a member of our Society than it is to become an enrolled member of a Federally Recognized tribe or band. Maybe I shouldn't say harder, but that the standards of proof are as high or higher.

We are a community, still live in the same areas and a "group". We all have family members in the same areas as well as extended family members who ended up in other States for various reasons, job requirements, military and so forth. We operate as a non profit, pretty much out of our own pockets at this point. For now. The reason we are a "Society of Indians" rather than calling ourselves a tribe or band is because a. We arent and b. Our families, even going back to the Creek Confederacy and old Cherokee Nation were still Shawnee (Even the Shawnee-Cherokee had to change their name to Shawnee Tribe in the 1990's), Euchee, Cherokee, Creek, Muskogee, Potawatomie, Catawba and others.

We hold all of our reunions through June and July like everyone else, but we have been recognized for "who we are" by Governor Deal of the State of Georgia by Proclamation of Native American Families of the Ohoopee River Week, August 7th-13th in Georgia, that is when we meet. Last summer we had members and their families come in from areas around Georgia, Florida, Alabama, North and South Carolina and Mississippi.

We dont like New Age and Pretendians any more than you all do. I personally follow Indian politics closely and have for more than 30 years. However, some of the things that go on in Indian politics are not much better. Everything that Russell Means and Wilma Mankiller told the US Senate was true then and is still true today. In some cases worse.

If you need any further proof of who we are, what our objectives are, official documentation, photographs or anything else. Let me know.

On a side note, my wife's and her family are Hiwassee Cherokee. A couple of her family members are on the board of the Removal Memorial at Blythe's Ferry and helped raise funds to build it, I believe they told me to build it was 15 million. Her cousin is the Treasurer. If someone is ever this way you should stop and see it. It is an amazing memorial. One of the letters written back to Georgia to ask for help for the Indians was written by one of my grandfathers, James A Powell. He too, buried in our family cemetery. He was a teamster on the Trail. Contact me if your coming this way and Ill show you my ancestors on the Georgia Monument.

Because we are real Indians.


Piff

  • Guest
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 01:57:38 pm »

Piff

  • Guest
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2017, 02:52:12 pm »
I'll tuck links in here as I look over what Jeff has posted.

Find a Grave for Mariah (McDaniel) Jarriel http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=mcdaniel&GSiman=1&GScid=1092186&GRid=40675918&

1880 census https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8G1-YSY

Name    Mariah Jarrell
Event Type    Census
Event Date    1880
Event Place    Cobb Town, Tattnall, Georgia, United States
Gender    Female
Age    54
Marital Status    Married
Race    Mulatto
Race (Original)    MU

1900 census https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M3VH-TVW

Name    Mariah Jarriel
Event Type    Census
Event Year    1900
Event Place    Militia Districts 351, Cobbtown & 1192, Blue Ridge, Tattnall, Georgia, United States
Gender    Female
Age    76
Marital Status    Married
Race    White

1910 census https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MLL6-YYW

Name    Mariah W Jarriel
Event Type    Census
Event Date    1910
Event Place    Militia District 1601, Tattnall, Georgia, United States
Gender    Female
Age    79
Marital Status    Married
Race    White
Race (Original)    White

Jeff, if this was my family, I would keep Henry Louis Gates' work "High Cheekbones and Straight Black Hair?" in mind: http://www.theroot.com/high-cheekbones-and-straight-black-hair-1790878167

Some researchers say that Mariah's father is unknown. That Mariah's mother's surname was Saturday, and that Mariah at times called herself Mariah Saturday.

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2017, 02:59:44 pm »
Yes on both. Along the lines of First Families. A Society acting as a non profit. As Gene Norris told me, they fully support these Societies, what they dont support is fake tribes. And as I told him, no worries, we aren't going to create a fake tribe out of thin air. We dont need to anyway, if we wanted to be a member of a fake tribe there are enough of them. Not to mention the fact that if our members did enough research they should have no problem finding an ancestor to apply for enrollment were open. That is not part of our Society objectives. Our first is to raise money to build a Memorial. You are welcome to sign up to our forum and take a look at what our objectives are. 

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2017, 03:05:15 pm »
Mariah was a McDaniel. Her grandmother was Susannah Sookie McDaniel from Halifax County, Virginia. Her mother was not Nicey Saturday and her grandfather was not James Saturday. James Saturday and Susannah McDaniel lived together as husband and wife so they could get two draws in the 1820 Land Lottery after they lost their property in 1818. You will find Susannah's son Reddick and his family in Chatham County, Ga in 1860 as the only Indian family there out of 4000 people. 

Piff

  • Guest
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2017, 03:12:18 pm »
Thank you for the information on Mariah.

Quote
I am eligible to be enrolled in a couple of different Tribes, Shawnee, Absentee Shawnee (My great, great grandmother Martha McDaniel is on the 1937 Citizen Potawatomie rolls but died in 1937 and another older grandparent is on the 1937 Shawnee rolls), it isn't something I am jumping through hoops to do at the moment.

Jeff, I am curious about this, why not enroll in a federally recognized tribe? Personally, if I was eligible, I definitely would apply for membership. I'd ask to be claimed as a member, for the kinship, and so I could participate as a citizen of a federally enrolled tribe.


Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2017, 03:14:22 pm »
Why would I keep Gates information in mind. None were negro's in my family. For some reason I cant post pics. I can however send you pictures.

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2017, 03:22:25 pm »
Piff, I was told by a family member in Miami I should enroll. I was also told the reason why. Greg Pitcher sent me an enrollment application and believe it or not, because I know there are a lot of people who would love to have the opportunity I have. I really dont care about being enrolled in a Tribe or band. Most of my ancestors gave up Tribal affiliation in 1860 when they joined the Confederate Army. That was the trade off. Unfortunately they lost. And along with it, Tribal affiliation, the war and some other things. You know as well as I do, I am sure, that our history is exactly the same as the Poarch. I had relatives who went to Kansas and Missouri not just Alabama. I was discussing that same question with my wife a few days ago. Truth. I dont care. That isn't what I am looking for.

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2017, 03:26:40 pm »
What I'm looking to do is build a Memorial to our ancestors. In Georgia.

Piff

  • Guest
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2017, 03:37:51 pm »
Piff, I was told by a family member in Miami I should enroll. I was also told the reason why. Greg Pitcher sent me an enrollment application and believe it or not, because I know there are a lot of people who would love to have the opportunity I have. I really dont care about being enrolled in a Tribe or band. Most of my ancestors gave up Tribal affiliation in 1860 when they joined the Confederate Army. That was the trade off. Unfortunately they lost. And along with it, Tribal affiliation, the war and some other things. You know as well as I do, I am sure, that our history is exactly the same as the Poarch. I had relatives who went to Kansas and Missouri not just Alabama. I was discussing that same question with my wife a few days ago. Truth. I dont care. That isn't what I am looking for.

Thanks Jeff.

I see Greg Pitcher here http://www.shawnee-tribe.com/old%20new/directory.htm responsible for Shawnee Tribe enrollment.

Quote
Most of my ancestors gave up Tribal affiliation in 1860 when they joined the Confederate Army.

Speaking personally,  if this was my heritage, I would not consider myself Native American. I'd consider myself a person with distant heritage.

Now, if I was eligible for federally enrolled tribal membership, I would apply. I would value being claimed as a member, kinship, and being a citizen of a nation (a nation engaged in nation to nation relations with the US federal government).

If I was not claimed, not eligible, I would appreciate my distant heritage for what it is.

No need to send me photos, I see photos of our ancestors as clues, but not at all proof.

I'm interested in the memorial to your ancestors you want to build in Georgia.

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2017, 03:41:54 pm »
Except that my heritage isn't distant. It's a lot closer than you think.

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2017, 03:46:06 pm »
BTW, I know photos arent proof. What proof would you like? Ill send it to you. I wont argue about it, I told you what I told you. And when I say I dont really care about being a Tribal member, I dont. 

Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2017, 03:50:10 pm »
You know something. After taking two seconds to think about it. I think you are right. I think I am going to send that paperwork in. You aren't the first person who has told me I should do it. It keeps coming up and people keep asking my why I dont. I honestly cant really think of a good reason why I dont. I also think I insulted my cousin down there in Miami when I was told why I should become enrolled and said I dont need that.

Piff

  • Guest
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2017, 04:12:31 pm »
You know something. After taking two seconds to think about it. I think you are right. I think I am going to send that paperwork in. You aren't the first person who has told me I should do it. It keeps coming up and people keep asking my why I dont. I honestly cant really think of a good reason why I dont. I also think I insulted my cousin down there in Miami when I was told why I should become enrolled and said I dont need that.

Sounds good.  :) In your shoes, I would definitely apply. I'd want to learn the process. If I was then enrolled, great. If not, I would learn from that.

"Tribal Nations & the United States: An Introduction" http://www.ncai.org/about-tribes

Quote
A Political Relationship
Native peoples and governments have inherent rights and a political relationship with the U.S. government that does not derive from race or ethnicity. Tribal members are citizens of three sovereigns: their tribe, the United States, and the state in which they reside. They are also individuals in an international context with the rights afforded to any other individual.


Offline Jeff_J1963

  • Posts: 15
Re: Hello from Ta'Na'Si
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2017, 04:21:07 pm »
Oh yea, I know the process. Not as hard as it appears. I've read the 98,000 changes over the years. It boils down to your one sentence. You are either enrolled, or you are not enrolled. So people keep asking me why I dont. Fact, I dont have any excuse. And I either will be, or wont be. Either way, not that big of a deal to me. But some people do keep asking and I know why some ask, because if I am eligible, so are they.