Author Topic: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor  (Read 2467 times)

Offline verity

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2021, 12:23:50 am »
I wonder if she still offers "moon ceremonies".

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If you are interested in attending a local moon ceremony please e-mail for more information.


https://web.archive.org/web/20100529125953/http://www.umich.edu/~ojibwe/community/ This is from a past site, email is her own.

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Margaret Noori, Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has explained that there are no shortcuts to language learning online, but the “Community” page  of  Noongwa  (now  located  at ojibwe.net)  has  made  the connection  between  lessons  and  “tradition”  (Noori,  2011, p.13).  Designed  to  allow  fluent  speakers  and  learners  space  to express  opinions,  it  also  contains  calendars  and  prayers  that work  to weave  spirituality  into  technology,  which  Noori  likens to prayers “through a wired window.”

https://www.bcteal.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/TEAL-News-Fall-2020.pdf#page=7

Who are her parents, grand and great grands?
What is her actual heritage? Who are her people?
How can we trust her language work?
Who does peer review of her work now?
Her songs, are they truly her own or someone else's?
Does she claim she offers spiritual teachings?
Is she gate-keeping, controlling, and crowding out other voices?

Is her mother Alice Ann (Orr) O'Donnell? If so, we can work up some genealogy. If not, we can keep checking though I've hit a wall myself. But ideally Margaret Noodin would just answer questions herself.


Offline Diana

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2021, 02:47:18 am »
I came to the same conclusion with Verity. Alice Ann Orr is Alice O'Donnell and her husband is Terrence O'Donnell. And if this is correct all her gggrand parents on her mother's side are immigrants. Poland, Germany,  England and Luxembourg.

Offline cellophane

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2021, 02:59:37 am »
Margaret O'Donnell appears in the Chaska HS yearbook (the picture is clearly her), but ancestry finds no one born in the county with the surname O'Donnell. Adopted?

Offline Diana

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2021, 06:09:37 am »
Alice and Terrence O'Donnell are from Chaska. I checked Margeret out on Been Verified and one of the places she had lived was Chaska MN. I'm going to say these are her parents and they're ggrand parents on both sides of the family are all immigrants. She definitely is not Indian. I'll post what I've found tomorrow.



Margaret O'Donnell appears in the Chaska HS yearbook (the picture is clearly her), but ancestry finds no one born in the county with the surname O'Donnell. Adopted?

Offline verity

  • Posts: 114
Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2021, 03:44:31 pm »
I came to the same conclusion with Verity. Alice Ann Orr is Alice O'Donnell and her husband is Terrence O'Donnell. And if this is correct all her gggrand parents on her mother's side are immigrants. Poland, Germany,  England and Luxembourg.

This is my working theory too.

Mother's side - Orr, Keppers, Palmer, Bernard surnames. Relatively recent Ireland, England, Germany.

Father's side Ireland, Germany. Plus Quebec, some from England and some from France.

Offline verity

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2021, 03:50:54 pm »
Margaret O'Donnell appears in the Chaska HS yearbook (the picture is clearly her), but ancestry finds no one born in the county with the surname O'Donnell. Adopted?

I thought that yearbook picture was a very good match too.

Ancestry doesn't have everything, so that is one possibility as to why no birth record found in that county. Or she was born elsewhere. Family Search does have a record of who is probably her sister.

Offline WINative

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2021, 05:15:22 pm »
So it looks like she was likely married and divorced three times since 1990, thus the surnames: Bodellan, Aerol, and Noori.

Since her maiden name is O-Donnell, she has already lied on her Wikipedia page, which someone pointed out to me was part of a mass amount done by the same person for other non-Indian academics.
She also claims to have been raised in the Twin Cities and with AIM, and learned Ojibwe at 15, which is a lie if she was raised and went to high school in Chaska, MN.
I think they final thing to expose is, is she really a descendant of the Grand Traverse Minnesota Chippewa. If not definitely is a fraud.

Interesting she never shows pictures of her birth family on her Facebook page just various Ojibwe elders since 2011.

https://www.facebook.com/margaret.noori

Offline verity

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2021, 05:35:48 pm »
Possible surnames:

O'Donnell birth surname

Benda, Aerol, Christensen, Bodellan, Noori (changed to Noodin) married surnames.

I wonder what is going on here:

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because you can be a Native American, even though both your parents came from, say, Afghanistan, and you were born in Ann Arbor, you're a Native American, so that gets sort of confusing in a sense

https://aadl.org/node/370469

Offline WINative

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #23 on: April 26, 2021, 06:07:21 pm »
Possible surnames:


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because you can be a Native American, even though both your parents came from, say, Afghanistan, and you were born in Ann Arbor, you're a Native American, so that gets sort of confusing in a sense

https://aadl.org/node/370469

"So when I grew up, the American Indian Movement was a really big deal, and this was, for us, in the 70's, this was -- I can't tell you how many times I would hear my -- especially my dad, would always say, "I didn't get to learn this," and drag us down to the Indian Center, but sadly for many years, all I ever learned was, you know, bezhig, niizh, niswi, which is one, two, three, and then maybe, up to ten, or maybe I could say, [INDIAN LANGUAGE] my name is Margaret. You know, like, we just learned these basic things, over and over, because our language, due to the boarding schools had actually atrophied. I mean it had been generations since anybody had been talking it around the kitchen table, talking it in the city, been proud to speak it, so if you listened to this song in the 70's, they sang it -- now I don't know some people here would know it, and I always was taught, like oh boy, if you hear this song you have to stand up and take off your hat, you know, so you guys are excused unless you really, you know, you grew up during the A.I.M. Movement, and you want to, but we would always sing it with just vocables, so it would be like, you know, yaawe, yaa we, and it was just -- it was no words, no meaning at all but still, it was really, really powerful. It was the kind of thing where if you heard that song, uh oh uh oh, this is going to be like big drama, something's going to happen, so everybody had to, like, stand there, and you would learn to sing it really early. It was just something, you know, it was kind of, like, a national anthem. You could hear it when they broadcast from Alcatraz, you know in the late 60's; you would hear it at the Indian Centers in Detroit, Minneapolis, you know, Milwaukee, all over; you would probably have heard it when Leonard Peltier was arrested. It was this anthem that was very well known. And we -- when we started having the language tables here, in Michigan, had said well wouldn't it be nice if we had words to this, you know, if we passed this on to the next generation, with one more level of depth and meaning. So we put words to it. I actually had brought tobacco, because you don't want to just go messing with an A.I.M. song, so I brought tobacco to Clyde and Vernon Bellecourt, and it was probably a long time ago. I'm much older than you know, and had asked, is this OK that we do this. For us, this would give it a little more meaning, and it would bring in another generation, and they had said, "yes, that's fine," so it's with the permission of those people who had really made it popular generations -- a generation ago, really -- that we added this."

Did Margaret Noodin really get permission from the leadership of AIM to re-write the AIM Song?

https://ojibwe.net/songs/womens-traditional/aim-song/


Offline Diana

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2021, 06:27:16 pm »
Father Terrence O'Donnell:

Terrence George O'Donnell
in the Minnesota, U.S., Birth Index, 1935-2000

Name:   Terrence George O'Donnell
Birth Date:   7 Oct 1940
Birth Place:   Stearns, Minnesota, USA
Birth Registration Date:   1940
Father:   Joseph O'Donnell
Mother:   Margaret O'Donnell


Terrence George O'Donnell
in the Web: Minnesota, U.S., Marriages from the Minnesota Official Marriage System, 1850-2019

Web: Minnesota, U.S., Marriages from the Minnesota Official Marriage System, 1850-2019Visit website
 
Name:   Terrence George O'Donnell
Marriage Date:   8 Mar 1963
Marriage Place:   Sherburne, Minnesota, USA
Spouse:   
Alice Ann Orr

Certificate Number:   MN104
URL:   https://moms.mn.gov/
 This record is not from Ancestry and will open in a new window. Learn more


Father's death on find a grave. Read obituary. There's a pall bearer by the name of Bodellan, this was Margeret Noodin's ex husband. Also it includes a Terrence O'Donnell from Chaska, so we know we have the right person.

Joseph V O'Donnell Sr
in the U.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-Current


Visit websiteU.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-Current

Name:   Joseph V O'Donnell Sr
Birth Date:   24 Feb 1898
Birth Place:   Hillman, Morrison County, Minnesota, United States of America
Death Date:   6 Feb 1990
Death Place:   Sartell, Benton County, Minnesota, United States of America
Cemetery:   Assumption Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:   Saint Cloud, Stearns County, Minnesota, United States of America
Has Bio?:   N
Father:   
John F O'Donnell
Mother:   
Amelia O'Donnell
Spouse:   
Margaret C O'Donnell
Children:   
Baby Boy O'Donnell
URL:   
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/173025771/joseph-v-odonnell

Joseph V O'Donnell
in the 1900 United States Federal Census


View1900 United States Federal Census
 
Name:   Joseph V O'Donnell
Age:   2
Birth Date:   Feb 1898
Birthplace:   Minnesota, USA
Home in 1900:   Hillman, Kanabec, Minnesota
Sheet Number:   1
Number of Dwelling in Order of Visitation:   6
Family Number:   6
Race:   White
Gender:   Male
Relation to Head of House:   Son
Marital Status:   Single
Father's Name:   John O'Donnell
Father's Birthplace:   New York, USA

Mother's Name:   Amalia O'Donnell
Mother's Birthplace:   Wisconsin, USA

Farm or House:   H
Neighbors:   View others on page
Household Members   Age   Relationship
John O'Donnell
39   Head
Amalia O'Donnell
35   Wife
Annie L O'Donnell
3   Daughter
Joseph V O'Donnell   2   Son
Mary Delany
16   Daughter

Grandfather

John O'Donnell
in the 1900 United States Federal Census


View1900 United States Federal Census
 
Name:   John O'Donnell
Age:   39
Birth Date:   Feb 1861
Birthplace:   New York, USA
Home in 1900:   Hillman, Kanabec, Minnesota
Sheet Number:   1
Number of Dwelling in Order of Visitation:   6
Family Number:   6
Race:   White
Gender:   Male
Relation to Head of House:   Head
Marital Status:   Married
Spouse's Name:   Amalia O'Donnell
Marriage Year:   1894
Years Married:   6
Father's Birthplace:   Ireland
Mother's Birthplace:   Ireland

Occupation:   Farmer
Months Not Employed:   0
Can Read:   Yes
Can Write:   Yes
Can Speak English:   Yes
House Owned or Rented:   Own
Home Free or Mortgaged:   F
Farm or House:   F
Neighbors:   View others on page
Household Members   Age   Relationship
John O'Donnell   39   Head
Amalia O'Donnell
35   Wife
Annie L O'Donnell
3   Daughter
Joseph V O'Donnell
2   Son
Mary Delany
16   Daughter

Grandmother

Amalia O'Donnell
in the 1900 United States Federal Census


View1900 United States Federal Census
 Add or update information
 Report a problem
Name:   Amalia O'Donnell
Age:   35
Birth Date:   Sep 1864
Birthplace:   Wisconsin, USA
Home in 1900:   Hillman, Kanabec, Minnesota
Sheet Number:   1
Number of Dwelling in Order of Visitation:   6
Family Number:   6
Race:   White
Gender:   Female
Relation to Head of House:   Wife
Marital Status:   Married
Spouse's Name:   John O'Donnell
Marriage Year:   1894
Years Married:   6
Father's Birthplace:   Germany
Mother's Birthplace:   Germany

Mother: number of living children:   3
Mother: How many children:   3
Can Read:   Yes
Can Write:   Yes
Can Speak English:   Yes
Neighbors:   View others on page
Household Members   Age   Relationship
John O'Donnell
39   Head
Amalia O'Donnell   35   Wife
Annie L O'Donnell
3   Daughter
Joseph V O'Donnell
2   Son
Mary Delany
16   Daughter

Offline verity

  • Posts: 114
Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2021, 06:50:16 pm »
Her teacher Irving “Hap” McCue passed away in 2008  https://www.michigandaily.com/uncategorized/ojibwe-teacher-mccue-inspired-students-faculty/

From earlier in thread here: "Native Sun Newsletter, 1992: "The instructor [for an Ojibwe class] is Meg Aerol, an Ojibwe from Minnesota who is fluent in U.S. and Canadian dialects""

From https://indiancountrytoday.com/archive/university-of-michigan-program-seeks-to-preserve-native-language :

 "Noori, a student of McCue's 15 years ago" (which would be about 1992)

"Before she joined the program in 2006, she said it had only about 30 students and one instructor, Irving ''Hap'' McCue, who helped to create the program and saw it add two instructors before his death in early March."

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She saw it working recently in one of her classes, when students wanted to know the Ojibwe word for black people. Noori told them it was mkade-aase, which translates to ''black skin.''

Noting that it was as offensive as referring to American Indians as ''redskins,'' the students suggested the word for black people could incorporate the word for Americans, chimookiman. But they balked when they learned that translates to ''the ones with long knives,'' reflecting past violence by whites against American Indians.

They eventually came up with mkade-bmizidjig, or ''the ones who live in a black way.''

''[The students] said, 'It's not the color of our skin, it's a way of life,''' said Noori, a Minnesota native of American Indian heritage. ''Being a modern use of our language, words can be introduced. ... That's what moves our language forward.'

---------

Margaret Noodin seems to now be holding herself out as "the expert".  I personally would not want her as a language teacher. I don't trust her stories about herself, she doesn't seem to be grounded in actual community other than academic and what she has created new, and I would not trust how she is evolving the language.



Offline verity

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2021, 07:02:55 pm »
Two other of her teachers are Jim Northrup and Howard Kinewon.

Offline Sparks

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2021, 07:17:28 pm »
Two other of her teachers are Jim Northrup and Howard Kinewon.

My bolding. Surname misspelled. The name is Howard Kimewon.

Often mentioned with Margaret Noori / Noodin, e.g. in this article: https://turtletalk.blog/tag/howard-kimewon/

Offline verity

  • Posts: 114
Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2021, 07:55:07 pm »
 After they walk on ...
Capriccioso, Rob. Indian Country Today; Oneida, N.Y. [Oneida, N.Y]10 Sep 2008: S8-S10.

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When Irving "Hap" McCue, an Ojibwe language instructor at the University of Michigan since the 1970s, passed away in March, several students and faculty members were left to ponder the fate of the institution's Native American studies department.

"For so many years it had just been Hap, and that was it," said Philip Deloria, a professor in the department. "If we had lost Hap in 1979, that might have been the end of it altogether."

McCue, who grew up on the Curve Lake First Nation Reserve in Ontario, was known not only for his pithy ways of teaching language in the classroom, but also for his stories about his life growing up uniquely Indian. He often shared tales of being placed in boarding school, of struggling with alcoholism even in his later years, and of being disrespected by some non-Indian scholars. He also counseled many a Native student at the university to help them understand where they fit in and how they could be resilient.

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Margaret Noori, who had studied Ojibwe with McCue as a college student, was one key to the university's path forward. She joined Native American studies at Michigan two years ago to assist McCue in his teaching, develop her own classes, and reinvigorate and intensify the long-standing program. Today, she teaches several rigorous language courses to dozens of students.

Offline WINative

  • Posts: 140
Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2021, 08:09:13 pm »
I wouldn't want to take an Oibwe language class taught by an Irish woman. But I guess some may not mind?
I think she may have had some legitimate teachers and learned Ojibwe in college, and which I have seen white students pick it up quickly.
But she should not portray herself as Native person with any Native heritage, if none exists.
She has been acting as a Gatekeeper at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and consolidating her power there and consulting on every article on Native people in Milwaukee.