Author Topic: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota  (Read 36271 times)

Offline earthw7

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Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« on: January 27, 2011, 05:24:59 pm »
The Lakota have seven bands
The Dakota have four bands
The Nakota have four bands

Lakota/Dakota/Nakota reservations recognized by the US government include:
We don not have unrecogized Lakota-Dakota-Nakota Nations

Oglala (Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)
Si?angu (Rosebud Indian Reservation/Lower Burle Reservation)
Hunkpapa (Standing Rock Reservation/Cheyenne River Reservation)
Blackfeet (Standing Rock Reservation/Cheyenne River Reservation)
Mniconju (Cheyenne River)
Sans Arc (Cheyenne River)
Two-Kettle (Cheyenne River)
Santee Reservation Nebraska
Yanktonai/Yankton (Yankton Reservation/CrowCreek Reservation)
Flandreau Reservation
Sisseton-Wahpehton Reservation
Lower Sioux Reservation
Upper Sioux Reservation
Shakopee Reservation-Mdewakanton
Prairie Island Reservation

Siouan language family

Dakota dialect - [also known as Santee (Isanti) Division]
1) Mdewakanton (mystery lake village)
2) Wahpekute (leaf shooters)
3) Sisseton (marsh village)
4) Wahpeton (leaf village)

Nakota dialect [also known as Yankton Division]
5) Yankton (border village)
6) Yanktonai (little border village)
7) Assinboine (Stoney Sioux)

Lakota dialect [also known as Teton Division]
7) Teton (prairie village) with 7 sub-divisions:
* Sicangu (burnt thighs)
* Itazipco (without bows)
* Sihasapa (black feet)
* Mnicoujou (planters by the water)
* Oohenumpa (two boilings)
* Oglala (scatter at one's self)
* Hunkpapa (head of camp circle)

The modern political divisions are as follows:

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Teton Lakota (Sihasapa, Mnicoujou, Itazipco, and Oohenumpa)
Primary location: Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, north-central South Dakota
Website: http://www.sioux.org/

Oglala Sioux Tribe
Teton Lakota (Oglala)
Primary location: Pine Ridge Reservation, south-western South Dakota
Website: http://www.lakotamall.com/oglalasiouxtribe/

Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Teton Lakota (Sicangu)
Primary location: Rosebud Indian Reservation, south-central South Dakota
Website: http://www.rosebudsiouxtribe-nsn.gov/

Lower Brulé Sioux Tribe
Teton Lakota (Sicangu)
Primary location: Lower Brulé Indian Reservation, central South Dakota
Website: http://www.lbst.org/

Yankton Sioux Tribe
Yankton Nakota (Yankton)
Primary location: Yankton Sioux Indian Reservation, south-eastern South Dakota
Website: http://www.yanktonsioux.com/

Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Yankton Nakota (Yankton)
Primariy location: Crow Creek Indian Reservation, central South Dakota
Website:

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota (Sisseton, Wahpeton)
Primary location: Sisseton-Wahpeton Indian Reservation, north-eastern South Dakota
Website: http://www.earthskyweb.com/sota.html

Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton, Wahpekute)
Primary location: Flandreau Santee Sioux Reservation, eastern South Dakota
Website: http://www.fsst.org/

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Teton Lakota (Hunkpapa, Sihasapa)
Yankton Dakota (Yanktonai)
Primary location: Standing Rock Indian Reservation, south-central North Dakota/north-central South Dakota
Website: http://www.standingrock.org/

Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota (Sisseton, Wahpeton)
Primary location: Spirit Lake Tribe Indian Reservation, east-central North Dakota
Website: http://www.spiritlakenation.com/

Santee Sioux Tribe of Nebraska
Santee Dakota
Primary location: Santee Dakota Indian Reservation, north-eastern Nebraska
Website: http://www.santeedakota.org/

Upper Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota
Primary location: Granite Falls, Minnesota
Website:

Lower Sioux Community
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Primary location: Morton, Minnesota
Website:

Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Primary location: Prior Lake, Minnesota
Website: http://www.ccsmdc.org/

Prairie Island Sioux Community
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Primary location: Welsh, Prairie Island, Minnesota
Website: http://www.prairieisland.org/

Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Primary location: Mendota, Minnesota
Website: http://www.mendotadakota.org/

Fort Peck Tribes
Assiniboine and Sioux (Yanktonai, Mdewakanton, Wahpekute, Sisseton, Wahpeton)
Primary location: Fort Peck Indian Reservation, North-East Montana
Website: http://www.fortpecktribes.org/

Lower Sioux Community
Santee Dakota (Mdewakanton)
Primary location: Morton, Minnesota
Website: http://www.lowersioux.com/

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation
Sisseton, Mdewakanton, Wahpeton, Wahpekute
Primary location: Manitoba, Canada
Website: http://www.dakotanation.com/

White Cap Dakota First Nation
Wahpeton, Sisseton
Primary location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Website: http://whitecap.myabitat.net/

Upper Sioux Tribe
Santee Dakota
Primary location: Granite Falls, Minnesota
Website: http://www.uppersiouxcommunity-nsn.gov/

Wood Mountan
Teton (Hunkpapa)
Primary location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Website:

Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation
Sisseton, Wahpeton
Primary location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Website:

Canupawakpa Dakota Nation
Wahpekute, Wahpeton, Yanktonai
Primary location: Manitoba, Canada
Website:

Birdtail Sioux First Nation
Mdewakanton, Wahpekute, Yanktonai
Primary location: Manitoba, Canada
Website:

Dakota Tipi First Nation
Wahpeton
Primary location: Manitoba, Canada
Website:

Dakota Plains Wahpeton First Nation
Wahpeton, Sisseton
Primary location: Manitoba, Canada
Website:


Alexis Sioux First Nation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_Nakota_Sioux_First_Nation#Reserves
http://www.alexisnakotasioux.com/

In Spirit

Offline Laurel

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2011, 12:16:30 am »
Certainly puts Keisha's claim to be "the shaman for the Sioux tribe" in perspective.

Offline Saga

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2011, 09:05:28 am »
Yes. Great information. :)

Offline Camilla

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2011, 11:00:12 am »
Thank you, Earthw7
Camilla

Offline tuschkahouma

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2011, 03:53:59 am »
Chiwere is Otoe-Missouria in Red Rock Oklahoma
              Ioway near White Cloud, KS
              and Perkins, OK
              Ho-Chunk near Black River Falls and The Wisconsin Dells, WI
              Winnebago north of Macy or Omaha Rez in Nebraska.

Dheghia is Kaw near Newkirk, OK
              Ponca near Ponca City, OK
              and near Santee Dakota in Nebraska
              Quapaw near Quapaw, OK
              Omaha near Macy, Nebraska
              Osage near Pawhuska, Skiatook,
              and Hominy, OK

Tutelo on Grand River Reserve, Osweken, Ontario
Monacan near Bear Mountain, VA
Saponi in VA, NC, and SC
Waccamauw Siouan in NC
numerous Siouan ancestries amongst the Lumbee Indians
Eno-Ocaneechi in NC
Chicora in SC
Catawba near Rock Hill SC and amongst Cherokees and Choctaws in OK
Biloxi and Ofo or Mosapelea amongst Tunica-Biloxi in LA

Siouans lived east of Mississippi River a thousand or more years ago

Offline educatedindian

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2011, 02:44:33 pm »
Thanks. Do you have contact information for any of these eastern Siouan groups? I know it may be more difficult as some of these groups, esp in the southeast, are not fed recognized. Though unlike the other case we've been discussing, there's little doubt the majority of them are who they say they are.

Offline tuschkahouma

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2011, 06:14:33 am »
This contact info is from a Tiller's Guide to American Indian tribes from the late 1990's.


Haliwa-Saponi Tribe
P.O. Box 99
Hollister, NC  27844
919 586 4017

Lumbee Tribe
P.O Box 68
Pembroke, NC 28372
910 521 8602


Waccamauw Siouan Tribe
P.O. Box 221
Bolton, NC 28423
910 655 8778

Catawba Tribe
611 East Main St
Rock Hill, SC
29730
803 328 2427

Offline tuschkahouma

  • Posts: 57
Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota ( I forgot to post these on previous post.)
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2011, 06:34:43 am »
Monacan Indian Nation Inc.
P.O. Box 1136
Madison Heights, VA 24572
Telephone: (434) 946-0389
Fax: (434) 946-0390


Tunica-Biloxi Tribe
P.O. Box 331
Marksville LA
71351
318 253 9767 ( I could be wrong but they mostly emphasize the Tunica history there)

Tutelos are amongst Haudenosaunee on Grand River Reserve near Brantford Ontario
I can't afford to call Canada anymore.

Offline earthw7

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2011, 09:52:53 pm »
Saponi in VA, NC, and SC
Waccamauw Siouan in NC

I am not sure if there has been evidence that these groups are relatived
to us I have been doing research on these groups for a long time and I can
not find any evidence that to the stories they tell are true. I have our oral stories that
show we have never been in the east coast we traveled as far as the Mississippi
River. We know that as we traveld up the Mississippi River our people broke off
from the Nation which was the Dakota. So that is how i know the Biloxi are a part of
us. I have to laugh when i hear the stories from the so called Saponi because they
always say they are decendant of the Blackfeet-Lakota people but the band was not
created until the middle 1700s so i would prefer you leave them off my list thank you. 
In Spirit

Offline tuschkahouma

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2011, 11:14:46 pm »
in all fairness the Haliwa Saponi are real. The Saponis in Ohio, PA, and MO I cannot speak for. I know that there are a lot of people
where I live who have ancestry from Virginia of all places. The Shakori, Saponi, Ocaneechi, Tutelo, Monacan, Manahoac,
and Nahyssan Siouan peoples all came from what is now VA and West VA. These people had plenty of unsettled area to hide
in in the late 1600's and early 1700's and more than likely intermarried with the poor immigrants moving beyond English
colonial control in that time. This probably explains the whole Blackfoot Cherokee misnomer I've also heard. I spoke with
a professor Heriberto Dixon from SUNY New Paltz at the Grand River Pow-Wow at Osweken, Ontario in 2003. He was
an Eno Ocaneechi descendant from two Siouan tribes that inhabited VA and NC up until the early 1700's. There are Tutelo
people who were adopted by the Cayuga Nation in the 1750's and live at Grand River now. I've spoken with Osage people,
Kaw people, and Otoe-Missouria people who acknowledge that the different Siouan peoples lived in the east and either
moved west on the Ohio (Dheghia), went to the Wisconsin area and went southwest across Iowa and MO (Chiwere),
or went to the top of the Great Lakes and went west (Lakota Dakota and Nakota). As far as the Waccamauw people
are concerned, they have had numerous books written about them and they were almost federally recognized by the US
Government in 1950. FYI, I began memorizing tribes off the top of my head about fifteen years ago. Here are the eastern
Siouan tribes I memorized alphabetically:  Biloxi, Chicora, Cheraw, Catawba, Cape Fear, Congaree, Eno, Keyauwee,
Manahoac, Moneton, Monacan, Moctobi, Nahyssan, Ocaneechi, Ofo or Mosapelea, Pee Dee, Santee, Sissepahaw
Saponi, Shakori, Sewee, Tutelo, Wateree, Woccan, Waccamauw, Waxhaw, Winyaw, and Yadkin. The eastern Siouan
domain was from VA through the Carolinas and west into S. Ohio, and KY. The Biloxi and Mosapelea migrated west and south
down the Miss River shore eventually winding up with the Tunica near the boot of LA in the 1770's. There are academic language books written by natives that show the linguistic connections of all the siouan peoples. I originally learned linguistic connections
and taught myself tribal geography pre colonialism through languages with the Swanton ethnology book at the Haskell library
about 13 years ago.

Offline earthw7

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2011, 02:29:41 am »
Can you tell me the stories i would like to here them,
We have our winter counts that shows our travels for two
thousand years, where we came from and we have no records of
being on the east coast. The only evidence is someone talks like us
and at that it is only a few words.
anyone who was native 300 years ago and married outside there people
would not be native today but only a descent of a tribe,
they would not have charartic of native people-no hair on their bodies-
no body ordor-hard ear wax-ect..............
In Spirit

Offline tuschkahouma

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2011, 04:48:42 am »
I have heard stories from Kaw people I've spoken to refer to a big body of water and shells in their old homeland. I know that they fought
the Haudenosaunee people before there was a confederacy. The Osage, Kaw, Ponca, Quapaw, and Omaha were once one people.
When they split the Omaha were the upstream people and the Quapaw were the downstream people. The Biloxi and Mosapelea or
Ofogoula (Dog People in my language Choctaw) split and went south along the Mississippi River and then went across the Mississippi
River and joined the Tunica on land awarded by Benito De Galvaez the Spanish Governor of Louisiana in 1778 that is now the Marksville
and Mansura LA area which I visited in 1998 going to Pascagoula, MS.

I've previously heard of a connection between the Lakota and the Mohawk in old times. I know that the Lakota and Dakota peoples
battled the Ojibwe in Wisconsin and Minnesota a couple of centuries ago and the Ojibwe won. The Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota
may have come across the Great Lakes and not the East Coast, but the Chiwere and Dheghia peoples came from the VA and NC
Coast. I remember a Kickapoo elder named Reggie in Lawrence, KS, who spoke of when his people fought the Dakota which
was probably between 1680 and 1720 and he spoke of the battles being in Illinois and Wisconsin. This was a story passed down
to him which he shared with me. This battle was east of the Mississippi River. There are Osage people I know that back up their
migration from the east and usually put it a couple of hundred years before the white people do like around 1100 AD or so. The white
historians state 1541 as the time when the Dheghia came west from the Piedmont area along Chesapeake Bay. You made me just remember
the split between the Yanktonai and the Stoney or Assiniboine above Minnesota in the 1700's. I love how skeptical you are.
You all question info on here that other native people I know have known for years. oh well.

Offline AnnOminous

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2011, 09:16:57 am »
Quote
You made me just remember
the split between the Yanktonai and the Stoney or Assiniboine above Minnesota in the 1700's. I love how skeptical you are.
You all question info on here that other native people I know have known for years. oh well.
I rarely respond to insolence but will make an exception here because I hate false information.
There are Stoney First Nations and Assiniboin First Nations Reserves in Alberta and Saskatchewan, in western Canada.
There are no Stoney or Assiniboin Reserves "above Minnesota."
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 09:18:53 am by AnnOminous »

Offline tuschkahouma

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2011, 02:00:07 pm »
if you read it right I said they split in that area and I know they are not there now. I have family near Kenora, Ontario, so I knew that.
Did I not say in the 1700's? of course they're not there now. Comment after you've read the whole statement. The Yanktonai
are further west with some of them being in Montana and the others in Canada and some in SD.

Offline earthw7

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Re: Lakota-Dakota-Nakota
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2011, 02:46:20 pm »
I've previously heard of a connection between the Lakota and the Mohawk in old times. I know that the Lakota and Dakota peoples
battled the Ojibwe in Wisconsin and Minnesota a couple of centuries ago and the Ojibwe won. The Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota
may have come across the Great Lakes and not the East Coast,


As historian I have to correct this the Dakota were in Minneosta and Michigan, the Lakota did not break off from the Dakota until 1600s they moved into the Minnesota area. It upset me that there is some much misinformation out there about my people. There was no Lakota in 1500s or before that the so called fight with the Chippewa happend with the Dakota because there was no Nakota either at that time. This fight happened in Michigan and it was only one fight no one lost and the Dakota moved south into Wisocnsin. I know my peoples history. That is why i can tell you sponi story is false because they say they come from the Blackfeet Lakota and they did not exist until after they left Minnesota and moved into Iowa then the Blackfeet broke off from the Oglala and moved north a very small band.
I am Ihunktonwana, Pabaska and Sisseton Dakota and Hunkpapa, Sihspapa and Oglala and if you don;t' know what that means
I am Yanktonais, Cuthead  then Sisseton of the Dakota and Hunkpapa, Blackfeet and Oglala of the Lakota.
I have been doing my peoples history for 20 years and right i can tell some of the eastern stories don't add up.
They can not even tell you what band and society they come from unless they read it in a book.
My people the Yanktonais formed a Hunka-Adoption with the Cree people and from them was born the Assiniboin or Stony Sioux People.
I know who Iam and where I come from
In Spirit