Author Topic: Terrie Victorino  (Read 5133 times)

Offline Rattlebone

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Terrie Victorino
« on: June 15, 2014, 11:34:55 pm »
 Here is a lady I have seen around the last couple years at powwows in California. She caught my attention because she carries around a newspaper clipping that identifies her as a "shaman."

Every time I see her she has that paper up in her booth above what she is selling. Now that I have read online that she is some kind of instructor of shamanic teachings, I can only assume having that paper up may possibly a way she uses to get more business for her crafts and classes she teaches, if she is in fact teaching new age shamanic classes.

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/terrie-victorino.html

Here is her email that she is using for business purposes

onemountaingal@hotmail.com


Offline Rattlebone

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2014, 12:04:45 am »

Epiphany

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2014, 03:22:23 pm »
Here is that article Rattlebone found:

Quote
Shaman guides students in quest

Published: October 23, 2007

By REBECCA HOWES
The Union Democrat

Drumming her way deep into the interior of the sacred self, Terrie
Victorino of Sonora guides others on a shamanic journey to explore the
dream the universe holds for everyone.

"A shaman is not something I call myself. Someone else calls you that,"
Victorino said. "I call myself a teacher."

Part Cherokee Indian, she sees herself as a facilitator assisting in
healing or a medicine woman.

"We can't explain shamanism. Does it matter as long as healing is invoked?"
she said. "I don't profess to be a healer. I give the tools and they heal
themselves."

Originally from Santa Cruz, she has studied, researched and practiced
shamanism for the past 20 years in an attempt to understand her heritage
and her ancestors. She moved to Tuolumne County four years ago to be close
to her parents, who live in Jamestown.

"I love the trees and the mountains and being outside," she said. "There is
a sense of community here."

As a student at Columbia College, Victorino was asked to speak in her world
religion and spirituality class on her knowledge of shamanism. Those who
listened told her she should teach classes, and she listened.

Preparing a syllabus and curriculum, she proposed the idea to Trudy Lackey,
coordinator of community education for Columbia College.

"Her knowledge of Native American spirituality impressed me," Lackey said.
"When I met her, I was convinced she should teach here."

Victorino began teaching the Wilderness Women Within class in Spring 2006
and was well received.

"Anyone who has taken her class has been very positive about the
experience," Lackey said. "I have been really pleased with her."

The class was so popular with the women that men started asking Victorino
if she would offer a Wilderness Men Within course.

"The women would come home and talk about the course to their husbands,
boyfriends and friends," Victorino said. "They wanted a chance to
experience it for themselves."

The class will be offered to men for the first time next spring.

Since the spring of last year, she has taught one other class Shamanism
and Animal Medicine, which is an introduction to the spiritual and healing
practices of shamanism and soul retrieval. The awareness of animals and
their ability to assist people in their everyday struggles is also
addressed.

Her classroom tools consist of a smudging fan, a talking stick, drums and
rattles, all laid out on a red cotton cloth that symbolizes blood shed over
the years and in life. To get beyond this reality, students listen to the
continual sound of drumming, which puts them in a trancelike state

"The shaman deals with both sides of reality," Victorino said. "This
reality and beyond."

She offers a second class to her Wilderness Women Within that is not
offered through the college. Known as the Vision Quest, this course
involves several meetings, as well as course work designed to help students
get ready for the nine day excursion to the Mojave Desert. The preparation
for the trip is nearly a year long, and safety is Victorino's main concern,
so she requires every person to be CPR- and first aid-certified before they
leave for the journey.

A vision quest is a turning point in life taken to find oneself, Victorino
said. It involves going on a personal, spiritual quest alone in the
wilderness, usually lasting for a number of days. Victorino's nine-day
excursion involves a four-day period of solo time, which includes fasting
and solitude. Food is thought to be a distraction, and solitude allows
students to be tuned in to the spirit world.

During their alone time, each person treks out into the desert to choose
their spot. They are only allowed to bring two tarps, a sleeping bag, a
memento from home for support, a journal, if they choose to keep one, and
four gallons of water. Once they choose their spot, they come back to the
home base to show Victorino where they are camped.

"The reason they don't have tents on the four days is so they are not
enclosed or shut off from any lessons they are supposed to learn," she
said. "The elements can be our teachers."

There is a buddy system that involves stacking one rock on top of another,
a signal the person is doing fine, halfway between camps to further insure
the welfare of those participating.

"Usually, the third night, the women will have their vision quest,"
Victorino said. "It can be something you see or feel or a new view on
something ? a healing."

For 10 years, Victorino studied with a female shaman in Santa Cruz. Several
years ago she went on her own vision quest to heal herself. For years she
suffered from grand mal seizures, and doctors could not understand explain
why.

"After my vision quest, I no longer had seizures," she said.

She has no great scientific or medical explanation for no longer suffering
seizures, but she believes everyone has a reason to seek answers, and
sometimes those answers can heal you.

"I am incredibly grateful to be allowed to teach shamanism. It is a dream
come true," she said as she choked on her words. "It's an honor to be
called shaman."

Her name on Facebook is Terrie Lane-Victorino.

Offline educatedindian

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2014, 11:08:30 pm »
Ceremony selling too.

http://terrie-victorino.artistwebsites.com/
Terrie is of the Cherokee and Choctaw Nation's and Irish descent. She is also an ordained Reverend. She performs wedding ceremonies catered to the bride and groom. She has been lovingly called the 'Desert Shaman Lady' as Spiritual Guide and Instructor in Shamanic Teachings & Earth Based Healing. She has lead many Wilderness Vision Quest groups to the Mojave Desert. She and her husband Michael travel to various Powwows and other various craft shows and sell their handmade Native American jewelry, and other various native art...

Offline desertlady

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2014, 04:05:34 am »
Hello, my name is Terrie Victorino. Apparently, there has been some discussion about me I would like to address.  First of all, the people who have slandered my good name did not even have the courtesy, curiosity, or the professional aptitude to confront me with their questions or allegations personally.  So, let me address your concerns. The article that was written about me and the classes I taught at our local Community College was done so on their on accord. I did not seek out the interview.  Nor was I paid for it. Our local newspaper called me.  If any of you (rattlebone, piff, and eduacateindian or others) bothered to actually read the article you would see that I have NEVER called myself a "Shaman". NEVER!!!!  My teachers have always taught me that to be wary of the one who calls oneself a Shaman. Because they clearly missed the message!  I was a teacher for a community college who taught courses in Shamanic teachings. Which I learned from many different teachers.....World Renowned Michael Harner, who is internationally known.  He is the founder of the Shamanic Institute in Mill Valley. He has studied with Shamans all over the world, through many different cultures.  Look him up, you might learn something. Also, Brant Secunda who is a world renowned shaman and healer who founded the Dance of the Deer Foundation in 1979. And there were others. The article posted in my craft booth? yes, not to sell classes, as I don't teach formally anymore for the college.  Is it placed above items I sell? yes, not to sell items, but because it is a 10 x 10 booth as is a convenient place to put it.  It wouldn't matter where in the booth I put it, it would be by items I sell.  It is there to spark conversation, which has lead to people wanting to share with me and seek counsel for their issues. Which I provide, free of charge, by the way. I do it, because it is the right thing to do. FYI-I also hold a degree in Human Services for counseling. Just so you know.  I believe educateindian had said that I "sold ceremony". Let's be very clear about this....I am also an ordained Reverend. I do perform wedding ceremonies. People do pay me a nominal fee for my wedding services. Just like any other member of the clergy who does wedding ceremonies.   Also, just FYI- my grandmother was full-blooded Cherokee and my grandfather was Choctaw.  I have 6 family members with Dawes Roll numbers.  I am requesting that these comments about me and who I am and what I do be removed from your forum immediately.  Next time, do your research more thoroughly and actually interview the person you are slandering first.

Offline ShadowDancer

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2014, 05:24:25 am »
Michael Harner - forum thread.  He has indeed been looked up and learned from. You might want to read what is known about him.

Offline Smart Mule

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2014, 01:30:45 pm »
Terrie, who wrote the following posted at http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/terrie-victorino.html?tab=about?

Quote

About Terrie Victorino

Terrie is of the Cherokee and Choctaw Nation's and Irish descent. She is also an ordained Reverend. She performs wedding ceremonies catered to the bride and groom. She has been lovingly called the 'Desert Shaman Lady' as Spiritual Guide and Instructor in Shamanic Teachings & Earth Based Healing. She has lead many Wilderness Vision Quest groups to the Mojave Desert. She and her husband Michael travel to various Powwows and other various craft shows and sell their handmade Native American jewelry, and other various native art. Terrie also has a love for photography and enjoys photographing the Mojave Desert.

You might want to brush up on the law http://www.iacb.doi.gov/act.html.

If your grandparents were indian then why didn't they teach you about tradition?  Why do you have to participate in the culture grabbing that is the basis of woowoo shamanism?  Why aren't you spending time with your respective instead of with charlatans like Harner and Secunda?

Autumn

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2014, 03:43:25 pm »

Offline earthw7

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2014, 04:24:33 pm »
Dear Terrie when you learn from fraud you are a fraud
In Spirit

Offline educatedindian

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2014, 05:05:06 pm »
Hello, my name is Terrie Victorino. Apparently, there has been some discussion about me I would like to address.  First of all, the people who have slandered my good name...
I believe educateindian had said that I "sold ceremony". Let's be very clear about this....I am also an ordained Reverend. I do perform wedding ceremonies. People do pay me a nominal fee for my wedding services. Just like any other member of the clergy who does wedding ceremonies.   Also, just FYI- my grandmother was full-blooded Cherokee and my grandfather was Choctaw.  I have 6 family members with Dawes Roll numbers.  I am requesting that these comments about me and who I am and what I do be removed from your forum immediately....

We never remove research, esp. just because someone does not like having their abuse or falsehoods exposed.

Slander is the spoken element. Libel is written. It's clear you don't know the law. Criticism is not slander nor libel.

I said you are a ceremony seller because you do sell ceremonies. You sell vision quests. Your own site says so. Has this changed? Have you stopped? And why would a Cherokee/Choctaw be selling a ceremony used by Plains tribes? Did you learn it from Harner or Secunda?

It could be you have very little understanding of your people's traditions and so were exploited and misled by Harner and Secunda. If so I urge you to learn the actual Cherokee and Choctaw traditions and quit spreading falsehoods.

Offline Defend the Sacred

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2014, 05:33:57 pm »
For some reason the IACB link Sky posted is not coming up, even though she pasted it in correctly. Let's try it again: http://www.iacb.doi.gov/act.html

Offline milehighsalute

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2014, 08:11:49 pm »
Hello, my name is Terrie Victorino. Apparently, there has been some discussion about me I would like to address.  First of all, the people who have slandered my good name...
I believe educateindian had said that I "sold ceremony". Let's be very clear about this....I am also an ordained Reverend. I do perform wedding ceremonies. People do pay me a nominal fee for my wedding services. Just like any other member of the clergy who does wedding ceremonies.   Also, just FYI- my grandmother was full-blooded Cherokee and my grandfather was Choctaw.  I have 6 family members with Dawes Roll numbers.  I am requesting that these comments about me and who I am and what I do be removed from your forum immediately....

We never remove research, esp. just because someone does not like having their abuse or falsehoods exposed.

Slander is the spoken element. Libel is written. It's clear you don't know the law. Criticism is not slander nor libel.

I said you are a ceremony seller because you do sell ceremonies. You sell vision quests. Your own site says so. Has this changed? Have you stopped? And why would a Cherokee/Choctaw be selling a ceremony used by Plains tribes? Did you learn it from Harner or Secunda?

It could be you have very little understanding of your people's traditions and so were exploited and misled by Harner and Secunda. If so I urge you to learn the actual Cherokee and Choctaw traditions and quit spreading falsehoods.
besides......anything PUBLIC (internet) is up for grabs.........if youre allowed to advertise it we are allowed to talk about it

Offline Sparks

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2019, 12:57:22 pm »
Here is that article Rattlebone found:

That 2007 article was posted in full in this forum when it was new, as first post in this thread:

http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=1384.0 [Shaman guides students in quest]

Offline Sparks

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2019, 01:36:06 pm »
The article i mentioned in my previous post is now at this URL:

https://www.uniondemocrat.com/csp/mediapool/sites/UnionDemocrat/LocalNews/story.csp?cid=3719624

("Published Oct. 23, 2007 at 12:00AM / Updated August 23, 2015 at 08:33PM")

It was questioned here the day after it was first published:

Comment:  All sorts of questions arise here. Which culture's "shamanism" is she teaching? Which culture's vision quest? Which tribe(s) taught her and gave her permission to use their sacred knowledge? Or are these just watered-down versions of Native belief devoid of tribal specifics?

Offline Sparks

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Re: Terrie Victorino
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2019, 12:21:50 am »
Terrie, who wrote the following posted at …

The underlying link in that post is somehow wrongly formatted, and goes astray.

Here is the link as it should be:
https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/terrie-victorino.html?tab=about

The text there is still exactly the same as quoted by Smart Mule in 2014.