Author Topic: An Actual American Indian Embassy  (Read 3192 times)

Offline educatedindian

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An Actual American Indian Embassy
« on: October 31, 2009, 11:03:28 pm »
It seems there have been dozens of fraudulent groups or sites claiming to be American Indian or tribal embassies, ranging from the Washitaws' (who did little besides set up a phone line in Switzerland) to the many phony ones being set up by the "Sovran Clans."

Here, as far as I know, is the first and the only genuine Native embassy set up in the US, or by any genuine tribe or group of tribes from the US.

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http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS208858+30-Oct-2009+PRN20091030
Reuters
Tribal Leaders From Across Indian Country to Gather in Washington to Open Embassy of Tribal Nations
Fri Oct 30, 2009 1:40pm EDT 

 Tribal Leaders From Across Indian Country to Gather in Washington to Open Embassy of Tribal Nations

Historic Opening in Conjunction with White House Tribal Nations Summit

WASHINGTON, Oct. 30 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Tribal representatives from all
corners of Indian Country will be joined by international dignitaries, Members
of Congress, Administration officials and tribal supporters to officially open
the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Embassy of Tribal Nations in
Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Nov. 3. The opening will include traditional
Native American cultural presentations.   

(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090128/DC63608LOGO )   

"For the first time since settlement, tribal nations will have a permanent
home in Washington, D.C. where they can more effectively assert their
sovereign status and facilitate a much stronger nation-to-nation relationship
with the federal government," said NCAI President Jefferson Keel.

The historic opening coincides with the 1st Annual Obama Administration's
Tribal Nations Conference set for Thursday, Nov. 5 at the U.S. Department of
the Interior. The Administration invited one representative from every
federally recognized tribe in the U.S. to attend the conference.

WHO: Tribal Leaders, International Dignitaries, Supporters of Indian Country

WHAT: Embassy of Tribal Nations Gala Open House

WHEN: Tuesday, November 3, 2009--2:00-8:00 p.m.

WHERE: Embassy of Tribal Nations
1516 P Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20005

We do expect remarks from Members of Congress as well as remarks from tribal
leaders. Remarks will depend on timing of arrivals. Press is encouraged to be
present for opening remarks and speeches (approximately 2:30-4:00 p.m.).
Please RSVP to Adam McMullin at amcmullin@ncai.org. Members of the press must
sign in and receive press badges upon arrival.

Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians is the oldest,
largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization
in the country. NCAI advocates on behalf of tribal governments, promoting
strong tribal-federal government-to-government policies, and promoting a
better understanding among the general public regarding American Indian and
Alaska Native governments, people and rights.

SOURCE  National Congress of American Indians

Adam McMullin of the National Congress of American Indians, +1-202-422-8416,
amcmullin@ncai.org

Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 718
Re: An Actual American Indian Embassy
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2019, 07:26:24 pm »
The two links in the previous post do not work any more, so once more a very good thing that the content was amply quoted.

Here is the NCAI official description of the Embassy:

Embassy of Tribal Nations
The National Congress of American Indians has long had a presence in the capital of the United States. However, in 2009, when the Embassy of Tribal Nations opened its doors in Washington, DC, NCAI and Indian Country saw the fulfillment of a dream of tribal leaders past and present.

The Embassy benefits tribes and tribal organizations in many ways, including solidifying the presence of sovereign tribal nations in Washington, DC; increasing public awareness of tribal governments and NCAI; improving the efficiency and work environment of NCAI operations and activities; providing housing for and better coordination with our sister organizations; increasing the value, long-term equity, and stability of NCAI assets; and solidifying long-term investment and savings for NCAI.

The Embassy of Tribal Nations has established itself as the Washington institution that physically embodies the nation-to-nation relationship. The Embassy not only serves as headquarters for NCAI staff and operations but as the nation’s most prominent center for advocacy work related to tribal nations. Tribal leaders from Indian Country and Indigenous leaders from around the world have come to know the Embassy more and more as their home away from home. People from across the nation—from Cabinet officials to school children, college students and leaders of national foundations—visit the Embassy each year and leave with a deepened and renewed understanding of our nation-to-nation relationship and the unique contribution tribal nations make to America and the world.

Historic Opening
The National Congress of American Indians has long had a presence in the capital of the United States. However, in 2009, when the Embassy of Tribal Nations opened its doors in Washington, DC, NCAI and Indian Country saw the fulfillment of a dream of tribal leaders past and present.

At the embassy opening in 2009, President Jefferson Keel said, “For the first time since settlement, tribal nations will have a permanent home in Washington, DC where they can more effectively assert their sovereign status and facilitate a much stronger nation-to-nation relationship with the federal government.”

Visiting the Embassy
NCAI regularly hosts meetings with international Indigenous leaders and other dignitaries, as well as educational meetings with school groups and college students. To arrange a visit to the Embassy, please submit a visit request form.

Facebook page (unofficial):
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Embassy-of-Tribal-Nations/135604706498381

National Congress of American Indians Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/ncai1944/

NCAI Twitter account: https://twitter.com/NCAI1944