Author Topic: "Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman."  (Read 3161 times)

Offline debbieredbear

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"Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman."
« on: January 06, 2009, 03:36:00 AM »
Got this from a friend in Oregon. I couldn't find much about him other than I suspect he is involved with some known frauds because of his alleged Huichol religion:

"This article appeared in the Oregonian this last weekend. It was picked up by the AP out of Medford, OR - see that one below this one. Are these folks real or fake? I have a feeling they are fake. If they are fake, do you have a way to get this info to the appropriate folks who could still intervene?"

 

http://www.oregonlive.com/ap/stories/index.ssf?/base/news-28/123071635371340.xml&storylist=topstories 

 

Shaman, wife win Ashland land-use case

12/31/2008, 1:31 a.m. PST

The Associated Press
 
 

MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) - A state decision in favor of a shaman and his wife who practice an animistic religion near Ashland will give Oregon churches more latitude to build houses of worship in rural areas.

The decision from the Land Use Board of Appeals says that cities can't treat churches differently from other community uses, such as parks and golf courses, when they consider land zoned for agricultural use within three miles of an urban growth boundary.

The board has ruled that Jackson County erred in denying Scott and Sulara Young's request to use an 11,000-square-foot dwelling on their 96-acre property as a church.

State land-use laws prohibit new church construction on land zoned for exclusive farm use that lies within three miles of an urban growth boundary, but it allows other community-based uses such as golf courses and public parks.

The board ruled that the distinction violates the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000, which provides, "No government shall impose or implement a land use regulation in a manner that treats a religious assembly or institution on less than equal terms with a nonreligious assembly or institution."

Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman. His wife, also known as Robin James, practices massage therapy at his office.

They call the ranch Circle of Teran in memory of a son who died at birth, and they have said they were guided to the proposed church site by spiritual forces.

They say their faith was developed by the Huichol Indians of Mexico. In general, animists believe that all things have spirits or souls.

The building is about two miles from the Ashland urban growth boundary.

"We're very pleased our constitutional and religious rights have been upheld," Sulara Young said.

"It's something we've been trying to challenge for a long time," said the Youngs' attorney, Ross Day, an attorney for Oregonians in Action, the Beaverton-based property-rights organization.

The decision sends the case back to county officials for review.

 

From http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071101/NEWS/711010327 

 

Ashland shaman claims land is sacred

Couple want to convert their home into a spiritual center; opponents counter that they're trying to create a tax-free motel

November 01, 2007



By Damian Mann

Mail Tribune

Divine intervention played a pivotal role in the creation of the Ashland spiritual retreat known as the Circle of Teran, supporters told Jackson County commissioners Wednesday.

"I do feel that divine inspiration is tangible there," said Ashland resident Harriett Rex Smith.

About 24 supporters and several opponents attended a public hearing to consider converting an 11,000-square-foot private residence into a church on property owned by Sulara and Scott Young. Scott Young is an Ashland plastic surgeon and shaman.

Young said the land historically has been used for sacred ceremonies. "The land is sacred and we are stewards of the land," he said.

Gary Lake, vice chairman of Shasta Nation, condemned Young's account, saying the Butler Creek Road center is using native religious beliefs to "hawk" its own brand of religion.

"He's piggy-backing on 1,000 years of Shasta culture," said Lake. "New religious rights are trampling over old religious customs and beliefs."

Lake said the development of the property will end up destroying sites considered sacred by the Shasta Nation, which he said hasn't been consulted by Young regarding the property.

Commissioners C.W. Smith and Dave Gilmour listened to both sides and decided to continue the matter until 1:30 p.m. Wednesday (see correction note below) at the Jackson County Courthouse auditorium, 10 S. Oakdale Ave. Commissioner Jack Walker, who is recovering from surgery, watched the hearing at home.

Ashland attorney Chris Hearn presented a traffic study and a master plan that county planning staff required as part of a zoning exception to allow a church to be built within three miles of an urban growth boundary and to change the zoning from exclusive farm use to limited use.

County staff also asked for a list of alternative sites where the church could be placed within the area, but Hearn said the residence built by the Youngs was the only place the church could be built.

"They were led to this site by divine providence," said Hearn.

Sulara Young said the land-use laws are unconstitutional because they are preventing the operation of their church.

"To deny this exception is to deny our religious freedoms," she said.

She said the Circle of Teran doesn't allow drugs, smoking or alcohol on the property. Young said the church has been created to serve God and humanity. "We did not build it for our personal gain."

Ashland resident Wendy Seldon asked commissioners to consider the higher purpose offered by this spiritual center that may not be easily understood.

"You have a belief system that you don't understand and that you may not believe in," she said.

Medford resident Dee Westerberg said the Circle of Teran could become a center that facilitates conflict resolution.

"I think it could be a world-class retreat," she said, pointing out the irony that the center has become the focus of so much controversy in this county.

Ashland resident Naomi Marie attested to the inspirational, transcendent feeling she gets visiting the Circle of Teran and the deep religious convictions of the Youngs.

"Being with them is like praying," she said.

Marie said it was difficult to discuss something that she thought was so spiritual in the context of land-use laws.

"I understand you have a difficult task," she said. "You're dealing with a spiritual issue through legislation."

Lee Weisel, a neighbor and one of the principal opponents of the Youngs' plans, said it was difficult to argue against divine providence.

But he said the Youngs only had one choice where they could place their house because that's the only location the county had decided it could be placed on the property.

"For some strange reason divine providence has been very flexible," he said.

He said the Youngs have previously stated that the place of power on the property was located at Squaw Peak, about a mile away from their residence. "Essentially, they are deceiving the county," Weisel said.

Squaw Peak is also about a mile away from a new residence the Youngs are building, said Weisel, suggesting that spot could have been just as good for the church.

He said the religion practiced by the Youngs, Huichol Shamanism, is obscure, and from his research he said a structure wasn't necessary for its practice at a place of power.

Weisel said the Youngs want a place for events and concerts, which have already been held on the property, that don't have anything to do with this religion.

"This is nothing more than an effort to create a tax-free motel and event center," said Weisel.

Reach reporter Damian Mann at 776-4476 or dmann@mailtribune.com.

Correction: The original version of this story included an incorrect day for the continued hearing. This version has been corrected.

 



Offline educatedindian

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Scott Young/Circle of Terran
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2009, 04:55:41 AM »
He's one of Brandt Secunda's franchisees.

-----------------------------
http://archive.mailtribune.com/archive/2006/1112/local/stories/circlehistory.htm
November 12, 2006
A brief history of the Circle of Teran

A 190-acre parcel at 2700 Valley View Road, Talent, is purchased in 1997 by Robin James, also known as Sulara Young, for $765,000.
A 9,900-square-foot house is built in 2002 on the property, which now has a real market value of $2.5 million, according to the Jackson County Assessor's Office.
A nearby 96-acre property at 3300 Butler Creek Road is purchased in 1998 by Robin James for $120,000, according to county records. An 8,000-square-foot house is built in 2000. Subsequent additions bring the square footage up to 11,000. The real market value, according to the assessor's office, is $4.1 million.
Sulara LLC and Robin James own a total of 1,700 acres on the former Ireland Ranch.
The Youngs have built a reservoir and a 36-foot-diameter geodesic dome with electricity and wood heat, which they have acknowledged to county officials have been completed without permits.

CIRCLE OF TERAN:

Scott and Sulara Young, on their Web site www.talktoteran.com, describe the connection they have with their son Teran, who died at birth, and whose name was used for the center:

"Teran is a brilliant spirit of light and love who is not in physical body. He landed briefly in the Earth, the son of Scott and Sulara, on June 12, 1994. He opened his eyes, looking at Scott with infinite love, then closed them and departed. He never took a breath. Teran did, however, stay in the Earth plane in spirit form to fulfill a mission based in love and service to God and his brothers and sisters on Mother Earth."

HUICHOL SHAMANISM:

Scott and Sulara Young, associated with the Dance of the Deer Foundation and the Foundation for Shamanic Studies, describe Huichol shamanism:

"Huichol shamanism honors all of creation, especially the spirit of nature — the power of animals, the winged ones, the minerals and plants. This shamanistic tradition involves healing and empowerment through personal transformation and direct experience as well as the healing of our families, communities and our environment.

---------------------

Oh brother. Very expensive indulgences for grieving yuppies.

I don't see how exposing his phony claims could help a case against him, esp one the courts already decided. The better strategy would have been to point out his "church" would defile an actual Native sacred site.

Basically, like they pointed out, it's a hotel posing as a church.

http://circleofteran.net/aboutus.htm
"CIRCLE OF TERAN RANCH:
 About the Ranch
IS A NEW SPIRITUAL RETREAT CENTER, A PLACE
OF GREAT BEAUTY AND COMFORT, BUILT BY SCOTT AND SULARA, SITUATED NEAR ASHLAND, OREGON, ON 1800 ACRES OF LAND SACRED TO THE NATIVE AMERICANS WHO LIVED HERE UNTIL ABOUT 1900." 

So if you're so spirchul, why not give the land back?

The good news is, it may not be so successful. It was up for sale.

----------------------
http://www.dailytidings.com/2008/0625/stories/0625_cirlce_of_teran.php
June 25, 2008
Circle of Teran retreat up for sale at $6.7 million
By Damian Mann
For the Tidings
 
Thom Larkin | Daily Tidings
The recently re-named Taowhywee (Morningstar) Point is part of the Circle of Teran property just outside Ashland that is for sale. The owners of the property, Sulara Young of Sulara LLC., and her husband Scott Young, a local plastic surgeon, confirmed the sale.A spiritual retreat founded on a vision sent from an Ashland plastic surgeon's dead son is now up for sale as the government continues the debate over its status as a church.

The 11,000-square-foot retreat and 96-acre property known as the Circle of Teran just outside of Ashland is listed for $6.7 million by Royce Real Estate Services.

The owner of the property, Sulara Young of Sulara LLC, confirmed the property was for sale but said she wouldn't comment on why she wanted to sell it. She is married to Scott Young, a plastic surgeon and shaman.

Sulara said the site for the house was picked based on a vision from her son, but didn't think selling the house and land would conflict with that vision.

"What we've built will always be this beautiful place of love and energy," she said.....

---------------------

Yeah, building a pie in the sky place for the well to do to convince themselves they're so spirchul put too much of a hole in their bank account. Chalk it up as an expensive lesson.

Again, if they were as enlightened and loving as they claim, they'd donate the land to the tribe. The write off might take care of most of their expenses.

Debbie, I don't think the ruling threatens anyone, except for city councils who try to decide where churches can be.
Your friend might want the journalists to do a follow up pointing out their claims are phony, but that's about all that can be done.

I see this couple as victims of Brandt Secunda's nonsense, and it cost them lots of money.

Offline bonestyx

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Re: "Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman."
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2009, 03:52:59 AM »
(Plastic surgeon) + shaman = Plastic shaman...in the vein of Eve Bruce ( Shaman, M.D.  -- http://tinyurl.com/7qnlob).

frederica

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Re: "Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman."
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2009, 04:27:04 AM »
Oh my, Plastic Surgery and ShapeShifting.

Offline bonestyx

  • Posts: 39
Re: "Scott Young is a plastic surgeon and shaman."
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2009, 05:58:43 AM »

Quote
County staff also asked for a list of alternative sites where the church could be placed within the area, but Hearn said the residence built by the Youngs was the only place the church could be built.

"They were led to this site by divine providence," said Hearn.

I wonder if "divine providence" is defined in the Oregon Revised Statutes. Doubtful.


Quote
"We're very pleased our constitutional and religious rights have been upheld," Sulara Young said.

Even when they are upheld at the expense of a creation you claim to honor???

Shucks, if hypocrisy were measured in dollars, these two would never have had to put the place on the market.


Quote
She said the Circle of Teran doesn't allow drugs, smoking or alcohol on the property. Young said the church has been created to serve God and humanity. "We did not build it for our personal gain."

I wonder if this SHAMan can explain how, exactly, the practicing of (his obvious misinterpretation of)"Huichol shamanism" is related to the Christian concept of God...And personal gain seems to be very much at the heart of this debacle, if you ask me.


Quote
Ashland resident Naomi Marie attested to the inspirational, transcendent feeling she gets visiting the Circle of Teran and the deep religious convictions of the Youngs.

"Being with them is like praying," she said.

Is it me, or is there a typo in that statement? Shouldn't that be preying, with an e?


Quote
He said the religion practiced by the Youngs, Huichol Shamanism, is obscure, and from his research he said a structure wasn't necessary for its practice at a place of power.


These two can practice all they want - because, as non-Huichols, they will never get it rite.


**********************************************************************************************************************


As for Circle of Teran itself, the place is totally disgusting in its opulence!

http://circleofteran.net/pictures.htm


This link was found on the site:

http://www.1gentlethunder.com/index.html


A lovely shot of "Gentle Thunder" can be found here:

http://www.1gentlethunder.com/aboutgt.html


And, if matters weren't bad enough, Sulara claims to be channeling her dead "Indigo child". Frankly, it all smacks of someone who has not properly worked through her own grief and is both masking it and trying to make a buck off of it at the same time. Mental illness, anyone?

http://www.talktoteran.com/


Meet the whole family(!):

http://www.talktoteran.com/meetpage.htm

Notice that everyone is identified in terms of their relationship to the dead child. Guess they are otherwise unimportant to mom and dad. Ah, the All American Fam-uh-lee.