Author Topic: Linda "Redheart" Bentley  (Read 6031 times)

Offline Emmia

  • Posts: 22
Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« on: October 26, 2008, 11:23:54 pm »
Found this on a website, when someone claiming to be native offers schamanic drumming it is usually a bad sign.

Let me know what you think.

Mia



Linda "Redheart" Bentley

Cherokee (Western Band, Oklahoma), Teehahnahmah Nation - Bird Clan

Native Craft Making Classes: Dream catchers, Prayer fans, Prayer Ties , Drum Making

Teachings and Classes for Groups:

Animal Spirits (how to know what yours is and how to communicate with them)

History and Traditions of Cherokee and other Native Tribes

Cherokee Herbal Medicines

Guided Meditations

Sweat Lodge

Shamanism Drumming

Pipe Ceremony

Crystals and other stones for healing's

Cherokee Language History Classes (History of Sequoyah and his work to give Cherokee people the first Native Alphabet

Please Notice that we only sponsor those who are known in their field and respect and do Native American Ceremonies the TRADITIONAL WAY. To participate in any of Lindas Shamanic, Sweat Lodge and other Spiritual related ceremonies you must be a suitable candidate.

Other events such as Cherokee Language, Arts and Crafts making and non related Spiritual are open to all participants - limited space.

Offline wolfhawaii

  • Posts: 292
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2008, 11:50:26 pm »
Can you post the link you found this info? I have never heard of the Teehahnamah Nation, and traditional Cherokee people do not usually advertise on the internet, or state their clan (or teach people their spirit totems, shamanism etc.)

Offline wolfhawaii

  • Posts: 292
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2008, 12:26:39 am »
Did a google for her, found a site carrying her  advertising a European tour. Same site where the Flute Keeper Kiowa dude was playing flute for the germans. Looks like a mixed plate. www.gilamusic.com

Offline educatedindian

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  • Posts: 4219
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2008, 11:15:11 am »
They don't seem to claim to be Cherokee, instead some alleged long lost tribe or people. Some claim they are also Cherokee or Lenape, like Donald Yates.

The Teehhanahmah home page says its run by "Chief Two Whitefeathers". Images straight from Franklin Mint plates.

http://www.angelfire.com/band/teehahnahmah/

One of the "nation's" pages also lets you report UFOs.
http://www.angelfire.com/rnb/unexplained/

A woman calling herself Kokeon or Kokie talks about their drum circles.
http://kokies-page.tripod.com/kokie.html

Other members photos, Dandy, "Talking Eyes," a guy with a bone through his nose, some weird toys, and of course their tipi.
http://www.angelfire.com/band/teehahnahmah/EYES.HTML

A migration map of where they claim their people were.
http://www.angelfire.com/band/teehahnahmah/migration.html

http://www.pantherslodge.com/tlang.html
"What is Teehahnahmah?
     Teehahnahmah is an ancient Native American language spoken by fewer than forty individuals in Tennessee and Florida. The language has never been recorded in anthropological literature, much less studied or taught. Thus it is not mentioned in UNESCO’s Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger of Disappearing (1996). The Teehahnahmah people themselves are small in number, non-federally recognized, obscure and secretive, divided between the Cumberland Mountains and the Everglades.
    Teehahnahmah does not appear to be related to any known language family or macro-stock, such as Siouan or Algonkian. It is thus an isolate, like Yuchi or Natchez, a one-of-a-kind language. Certain Teehahnahmah songs, vocables and sacred formulae are perpetuated in the ceremonies of the Cherokee, Yuchi, Shawnee and other Indians, indicating a pattern of interaction between these tribes and suggesting that Teehahnahmah may have served as a religious language or sort of lingua franca. Teehahnahmah annual migration routes ranged all across the eastern tributaries of the Mississippi, from the Great Lakes to the Altamaha and Gulf Coast.
    In addition to a core vocabulary of approximately 2,000 words, Teehahnahmah is also used and understood as a sign language, one similar to Plains Indian Sign Talk. Its wide range can be seen in the fact that at least one word, kiyugwe, was borrowed by tribes as disparate as the Powhatan in Virginia and Tupi in South America (where the Teehahnahmah people claim to have lived at one time). This word gives us English “cougar.??? Words for wooly mammoth and other extinct megafauna prove Teehahnahmah’s antiquity."

There's also a heritage site that's still empty.

One of their alleged medicine women, Lisa Bedner, peddles classes.

--------------------
http://pipsissherbs.biz/classes.html

Lisa "Pipsissewa" Bedner R.N., R.H. (AHG), teaches all classes. Ms. Bedner is a practicing Medical Herbalist and Medicine Woman for the Teehahnahmah Nation. Her teachings include Native American healing traditions and spiritual practices.

CLASSES FOR INDIVIDUALS

One hour — $25 per person
Includes tour of herb gardens, iced herb tea, herb folklore and tidbits

Two hours — $45 per person
Includes tour of herb gardens, iced herb tea, herb folklore and tidbits, instructions on making teas, decoctions, and tinctures OR instructions on harvesting and preparing herbs for cooking and potpourri.

Four hours — $85 per person
Includes tour of herb gardens, iced herb tea, herb folklore and tidbits, plus choice of highlights from one of the following two classes:

Herbal Medicine 101
Full day – eight hours – $185 per person

Herbs for Scent and Taste 101

Class on basic herbal crafts includes instructions on making teas, scented oils, vinegars, and easy to use herbs for cooking and side dishes.
Full day – eight hours – $185 per person
 
WORKSHOPS FOR GROUPS

INTRODUCTION TO HERBAL MEDICINE

This two (2) day workshop includes basic through intermediate levels of Native American medicine. Teachings include:

PHYSIOLOGY: Basic discussions of human structure and function as it relates to health, wellness, and disease in the body.

MEDICINE MAKING:  Hands on instruction and practice of preparing teas, decoctions, tinctures, poultices, inhalations and salves.

MATERIA MEDICA: Information on choosing which herbs can be most helpful for health, wellness, and disease in the human body. Emphasis will be on native and naturalized plants of the Eastern United States. Those plants which were in use but are now considered endangered or threatened, will be omitted.

PLANT IDENTIFICATION: Nature walks will be conducted in woods, field, and display garden areas. Instruction on basic botanical identification and clarifying types of related species.

HERB GROWING: Instructions on how to grow your own medicinal herbs, using organic methods. Includes tour of the greenhouses, gardens, and opportunity to purchase herb starter plants and seeds.

WILDCRAFTING: Instructions for harvesting and preserving  herbs for use in preparing medicines. After completion of this course, the student will be able to grow, harvest, wildcraft, and prepare basic herbal medicines for health, wellness, and illness.

NATIVE AMERICAN LORE AND PRACTICES: Legends and Native teachings about herbal medicine, spiritual healing, and ceremonial healing. These may be adopted from the Teehahnahmah, Cherokee, Lenape, or other Native Peoples.

HERBAL MEDICINE FOR WOMEN

One day workshops include Native American herbal medicine, European herbal medicine, Vitamin, Mineral, and Nutritional therapies for women’s health and wellness.  Classes are taught with an emphasis on those aspects of the following that directly relate to women’s health:

CURRENT HEALTH ISSUES:  Natural alternatives to Hormone replacement therapy,  bone health and osteoporosis,  herbs for menopause and peri-menopause, weight loss strategies, heart health and breast health.
.     
PHYSIOLOGY: Basic discussions of human structure and function as it relates to health, wellness, and disease in the body.

MEDICINE MAKING:  Hands on instruction and practice of preparing teas, decoctions, tinctures and more.

MATERIA MEDICA: Information on choosing which herbs can be most helpful for women’s health and wellness.

PLANT IDENTIFICATION: Nature walks will be conducted in woods, field, and display garden areas.

Teachings include Native American healing traditions, spiritual practices, and Materia medica.

ADVANCED NATIVE AMERICAN HEALING
This one day workshop includes advanced practices of Native American Medicine People. Topics include advanced herbal formulas, smudging plants, the Healing Drum, Healing chants, principles of Healing Lodges and Fire Ceremonies, and more. Prerequisite: completion of Introduction to Herbal Medicine, equivalent course at another school, or working knowledge of plants and herbal medicines. Please contact us for details and arrangements. This workshop is available by special arrangement only and requires prerequisite classes or studies.

PROFESSIONAL HEALERS WORKSHOP:
Essentials of Physical Exam Skills and History Taking
For Alternative Health Care Practitioners

LISA’S GREENHOUSE AND GARDENS is located in Scenic Middle Tennessee, traditional home of the Cherokee, Lenape, and Teehahnahmah Nations. The site covers 23 acres, including display gardens, greenhouses, herb production, and natural woods.
   
 FEES

Non-refundable deposit: $50
Must be post-marked at least three weeks before the date of a workshop.

INTRODUCTION TO HERBAL MEDICINE: $350
Includes two days of classes, lunch, and coffee or cold drinks both days.

ADVANCED NATIVE AMERICAN HEALING: $185
Includes two days of classes, lunch, and coffee or cold drinks both days.

HERBAL MEDICINE FOR WOMEN: $185
Includes one day of classes, lunch , and coffee or cold drinks.

PROFESSIONAL HEALERS WORKSHOP: $400
Includes two days of classes, lunch, and coffee or cold drinks both days....
 
Checks or money orders may be made payable to:

        LISA BEDNER
        450 davidson chapel Ln
        Bloomington Spr, TN 38545

To pay by credit card, you may pay Lisa Bedner at PayPal.com.

All of our herbs are organically grown, prepared fresh, and harvested by hand, honoring the Earth Mother in the traditional Native American way.

----------------------------

Besides her two year nursing degree, her claimed training is

http://www.pipsissherbs.biz/Bio.html
Apprenticed 5 years with an Eastern Cherokee Medicine Man

Apprenticed 1 year with a Shoshone Medicine Woman

Apprenticed 1 year with a Teehahnahmah Medicine Man

Conducted 15 years of self study in many forms of Herbal Medicine

Attends ongoing workshops and classes in Herbal Medicine

Educational Director of the annual Folk Medicine Festival of Boiling Springs, TN; 1992-1998

Offline wolfhawaii

  • Posts: 292
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2008, 05:09:27 am »
I am not aware of middle Tennesee being a Lenape stronghold...far as I know it was a buffer zone between the Cherokee and Chickasaw, with occasional occupation by the Shawano. I recently read a pretty thorough ethnographic report on Southeast Indians including some pretty obscure remnant peoples and saw no mention of Teehahnamah....guess they saw the ethnographers coming and hid out. PS I think the guy with the "bone" in his nose is actually on oxygen. NICE tipi though:)

frederica

  • Guest
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2008, 02:34:33 pm »
I am not aware of middle Tennesee being a Lenape stronghold...
         They are not, that is the United Lenape Nation that was recognized as a 501(c)3 organization in the early eightys. Were the Upper Cumberland River Cherokee before that.  At one point they did not renew their charter, but are still only recognized as a organization.  Plus, they are mixed, claims of Cherokee, Shawnee, Choctaw, Lenape and so on. What I remember is that one came from Ohio and started the group.

Offline wolfhawaii

  • Posts: 292
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2008, 04:24:01 am »
This thread is missing something....ahh, here it is!

TRIBALMOONS@yahoo.com

  • Guest
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2008, 04:19:32 pm »
 ::) It's all a bunch of donkey dung.

Offline Emmia

  • Posts: 22
Re: Linda "Redheart" Bentley
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 05:54:01 pm »
Hello to everyone and thanks for all your responses!
I am so sorry that I haven't gotten back to you earlier, my computer crashed and it isn't until two weeks ago that I got everything back in order again.
I'll leave more information on the thread about the flutist.
Thanks again!

Mia