Author Topic: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry  (Read 34931 times)

Offline Synapsis

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2009, 11:02:04 am »
nevermind
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 12:59:56 pm by Synapsis »

Offline Tsu Dho Nimh

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2009, 07:14:59 pm »
PODIAs (People Of Distant Indian Ancestry)

I thought PODIA was "Person Of Dubious/Doubtful Indian Ancestry"

Offline seekingtruth

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2009, 04:58:45 am »
Is it ever the case that a person with no NDA ancestry is ever adopted by a nation?

Offline earthw7

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Doucet_Indian

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2009, 01:38:21 pm »
Hi:

 I wanted to bring up a point about this subject as it pertains to me. My situation is kind of the opposite of most. I didn't go searching for my Native culture, it has come looking for me.

I am from Louisiana, and am of Acadian descent. My family has always known we had Indian blood on both sides of the family, and I always assumed it was Louisiana Indian. A couple of years ago, I starting researchin my background and was surprised. My family is actually Mi'kmaq, as are many Acadians. I didn't have just one ancestor who was Indian, but many, and all are very well documented. Most of these ancestors were Indian women who married Frenchmen, which was very common. I was really surprised when I had my YDNA tested, and the results came back Indian. My surname is Doucet, and more research has revealed that many Mi'kmaq share that surname.

Although I have always been interested in Indian culture, I have always had a distaste for "plastic" Indians and New Agers who exploit Indian culture. I have actually been approached by Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia about enrolling in a band.

There has been somewhat of a battle going on up there between Mi'maq and some Euro-centric Acadian researchers. When I shared my DNA results, I started hearing from some of these researchesrs who claimed that my DNA results were wrong. All of this has been interesting to say the least.

So, what am I doing? I am letting them take the lead. I would never presume to barge into the culture claiming that I am entitled. Overall I would have to say that this has been a positive experience so far.

Offline abraxite

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2010, 03:24:52 am »
As  a person searching for identity in a way, wish to know where to get DNA tests to see what i have as Indian lineage..haho

Offline educatedindian

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2010, 01:38:11 pm »
Do a search for our threads on DNA tests. They're often unreliable, giving both false positives and false negatives, and won't tell you what tribe your people might be.

Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2010, 01:06:40 am »
Blessings from afar I have only just recently found out I have some native american ancestory in me...I have always been one with nature and its practices ( I remember a bit from my own mother growing up we were brought up with alot of natural native american healings.. ) ... always felt connected but not quiet known where I was meant to be..I came accross your forum and found it most helpful I want to learn more but know not where to start. the warnings Im reading of frauds are quiet scary as I too came accross a aparent local teacher preaching she was tasalgian medicine woman (spelt it wrong ) but also claims she is traditional gypsy amonst other paths with aka so called qualifications from teachers of the American Tribes I have never heard before... last heard this woman claims to be a full blood cherokee practioner ( yet she has no blood line nor any proof of training just a name of her apparent teacher that doesnt come up on google or anywhere on the net? .... She also claimed she was trained within a year and iniated into the tribe this year once again no proof of who , how and when ... I myself would never label myself something I am not but this one is and its sad because many gullable people are falling for it... as I knew her she went through several paths wiccan, balkin, viking, native american, hoodoo and gypsy and still claim to be all of these? yet claiming to belong to a native american Tribe? so here I stand wanting more knowledge from the authentic people not someone who claims they are 101 different tribes and paths? I Hence why I am here how do I get in contact with the right way to learn more about my path and 2 how do I discretly expose those that are oviously abusing the tribal names and authenticys?
another question is if one does not have any direct bloodline as a native american tribe member his that path for everyone anoys me when these people like the one I have described today wake up one day and go Im going to be a cherokee ... it takes time patience and much education to get up to half the speed of the true authentic tribal members and I cannot understand how one day they can me wiccan and then the next a tribal leader? any imfo on this matter will be well received and appreciated...

Offline earthw7

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2010, 06:37:20 pm »
Just because a person has a Native American decent that happens to be native does not make them native,
We are defined by our families and if you do not know your family the Native people will not
accept you. Being Native is raised in your culture, langauge, history ect..is important.
We do have many people who were adopted and found their way home and their families
or the tribe teach them who they are relatived to.
Our Nations do not adopt people, individual families adopt people and that person has no right
to our culture, langauge and most of spirituality. They never talk for the tribe.

In Spirit

Offline Hair lady

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2011, 07:00:15 pm »
 ;D I just say it like it is! I am a wonderful Heinz 57 sauce. I feel right at home out on the rez, in a city, and even over here in Europe. I have roots ALLL over the place. I don´t really worry about it. I mean aren´t there more imortant things in the world to worry about? I can offend ndn people just as well as I can offend any other kind of people. Man you shoudl see me feud with some memebers of my family! hehe I think all this walking on egg shells is just silly. Most ndns I know have thick skins, and are usualy teasing all the time when they see someone acting funny. I guess it´s all about feeling comfortable in your own skin no matter what colour it has. You either know who aour are or you don´t.

Just my opinion of course.

Offline SunnyinNJ

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2011, 01:46:44 am »
I think what's posted in this topic is really helpful.

I'm a librarian and family historian (not a certified genealogist) which means I'm researching the ancestry of my families (all of them), not teaching or being paid to research for others. 

I have reported Native ancestry that I have not yet been able to verify after 35 years of research.  I made a lot of foolish and embarrassing mistakes early in my research that resulted in doors being slammed in my face and people withdrawing from me.  It took me a while but I finally learned that even if the family stories are true, I was not raised as a Native person, I was raised as a white person.  I wasn't raised with any Native traditions or spirituality.  There were no Native American artifacts passed down in my family although I have a very vague, possibly imagined, memory of talk with my maternal grandmother about a cradleboard. 

People searching for their roots tend to be very enthusiastic, even obsessive, and tend to forget that the universe doesn't revolved around their quest to be Native American.  It's helpful to be told how to behave and still be respected.

Thank you.
Lorraine - SunnyinNJ

Epiphany

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2011, 02:09:29 pm »
I think what's posted in this topic is really helpful.

I'm a librarian and family historian (not a certified genealogist) which means I'm researching the ancestry of my families (all of them), not teaching or being paid to research for others. 

I have reported Native ancestry that I have not yet been able to verify after 35 years of research.  I made a lot of foolish and embarrassing mistakes early in my research that resulted in doors being slammed in my face and people withdrawing from me.  It took me a while but I finally learned that even if the family stories are true, I was not raised as a Native person, I was raised as a white person.  I wasn't raised with any Native traditions or spirituality.  There were no Native American artifacts passed down in my family although I have a very vague, possibly imagined, memory of talk with my maternal grandmother about a cradleboard. 

People searching for their roots tend to be very enthusiastic, even obsessive, and tend to forget that the universe doesn't revolved around their quest to be Native American.  It's helpful to be told how to behave and still be respected.

Thank you.
Lorraine - SunnyinNJ

I really appreciate this topic (and entire forum) too. This opportunity to learn and discuss in a moderated civil environment is invaluable.

Some folks obsessed with finding NDN ancestry get angry and defensive when encouraged to do the actual work of genealogy, but ultimately I think that is what it takes, doing the work. Following the actual research trail rather than cobbling together a fantasy.


Offline snorks

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2011, 11:19:38 am »
It is necessary to clear eyed and sober about this.  What I have found is that folks who are desperate to have that ancestry fall prey to exploiters.  For example, Brooke medicine eagle who is a White woman posing as an Indian gets a lot of people in her snare.  She presents an "Indianism" that is safe and feeds into some White ppls' fantasies or notions.  However, the reality is that Native Americans are as foreign as Egyptians or Chinese.  They have their own particular cultural ways that are foreign to many White ppl.  

Offline nativemetalgrl

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2011, 10:14:03 pm »
You know... It's really too bad this thread didn't stay more on topic.  I think this thread, had it stayed on point, could have been a very valuable resource for everyone.  Think about it.  If not for the PODIAs who don't know any better, the frauds wouldn't exist. 
I think that, instead of certain members at the beginning of this thread jumping right in and defending their supposed entitlement to NDN culture and demanding to be shown EVERYTHING right now, we should have made more of an effort to keep this tread on topic. 
So, in and effort to do just that, I will throw in a bit of my own advice.

Earlier in this thread, we saw something that just shouldn't EVER be done.  NEVER EVER demand to be taught about traditional things.  It seems that people who have grown up in mainstream America have this sense of entitlement that they will vehemently defend.  In this culture, we're taught we can "have it all" and "do anything we want."  While the intended message was more along the lines of careers and levels of financial success, most PODIAs mistake this to mean they have a god-given right becuase they're 1/32nd Cherokee to practice the culture and that the Cherokee community has some obligation to teach them at their request.  This is absolutely NOT the case and the more you "defend" your cherokee-ness and demand to be part of a community you never knew even existed until the 1990s when it became "cool" to be Indian, the more you'll push traditional people away.

Don't be pushy or demanding.  Be receptive, open minded and just observe.  There is a lot to be learned through observation and it takes NDNs a long time to warm up to non ndns.  Mainly because so many times before, they have been fooled by someone who seems on the level, then takes everything they're taught and exploits it.

Be patient, shut your mouth and observe.  Finding out you have a certain degree of minority heritage does not entitle you to strong-arm your way into their culture.  For example.. I'm 1/16 black, but NEVER would I EVER claim to be a black woman.  I would never pretend to know their struggle and I would never tell every black person I meet about my Black GGrandfather.  Nor would I rock a daishiki or cornrows.  It's not that I'm ashamed of this blood, I think it's actually kinda cool, but I wouldn't dream of trying to be part of their community just because I have a little bit of black ancestry. 

Don't try to hard to over explain exactly where your NDN blood came from.  Nobody needs a 5 generation run-down of your family history.  Whenever you launch into one of these lengthy explanations, people start to wonder who you're trying to convince - them or YOURSELF!  Don't talk about how your gggrandmother had high cheekbones and dark hair as if this is some kind of irrefutable proof of your indianness.  If asked what your tribe is, be honest and tell the person you have some cherokee - or whatever tribe it is - blood and leave it at that.  If they want details, they'll ask.  If they do ask, don't get long-winded.  Keep your answers short and to the point.  Again, leave your familiy history out of it. 

which brings me to another point... KNOW YOUR TRIBE!!!!!! Before you claim ANY heritage, do some fact-checking first.  A lot of people claim Cherokee where there is none.  There are several people on this board who probably know volumes more about genaology than me and I'm sure there are a few threads here you can reference.  Make sure there was actually an ndn relative and confirm the tribe and if there is no evidence there, then consider that the story you heard has probably been handed down through a few generations and could have gone through some changes.  for example: "people used to tell your GGGGrandma she looked NDN.. like a Cherokee" after a couple generations "I think she was Cherokee"  couple more generations "She was Cherokee" ... etc. 

I can't emphasize this one enough, I know it's been stated elsewhere, but I believe it warrants reiteration.  If a supposed "medicine person" takes a particular interest in you, yet you haven't known them for very long, BE AFRAID.. be very afraid.  Even FULL BLOODS have to earn the right to perform certain dances and ceremonies and this process can take a lifetime!  If someone is willing to just hand this "knowledge" to you, then it's bogus and it probably won't be long till your newfound "cousin" or "grandfather" is asking you for a loan.  NEVER EVER pay ANYONE for traditional knowledge or "lessons." This also goes for ceremonies.

Use your REAL name.  Resist the urge to take on an NDN name just because you feel it "speaks to you."  Naming is something that is taken very seriously by NDNs.  Most get their names as babies and some tribes change that name with each stage of that person's life.  Natives NEVER name themselves.  Even if they do, especially with Cherokees, they're not gonna be names like "little white dove" or "rainbow warrior."  Some REAL Cherokee names include Squirrel, Swimmer, Drywater, Dreadfulwater, Holmes, Holcomb, Mankiller, of course.  Most Cherokees today have more Anglo sounding names like Barnes, Smith, Robertson, etc.

Also, keep in mind that when you take a name like "yellowbird" or "Red Elk" or even ManyGoats.. lol you may be using someone's real family name!!! You'll be taken a lot more seriously if you forgo using these types of names.. even on message boards!

Another poster touched on this and I'd like to expand on it a little.  Women... If what appears to be a NDN man is chatting you up and coming on strong, the temptation can be there to let him snag you out.  Resist this please.  I've known several VERY good looking Native guys who systematically woo PODIAs and white women in an effort to either use them for sex or bilk them for cash.  One d00d I knew had this woman taking him on expensive vacations, paying his tuition and even his CHILD SUPPORT!!!  :o  They're well aware that non NDN women have the "long haired NDN warrior" fantasy and that they're willing to do just about anything to live out that fantasy.  Keep your guard up.

If you're gonna go to powwows.. holy crap, I could write VOLUMES about this subject!!!
I'll try to keep it brief. 
First, understand very few tribes have powwows as part of their traditions.  Cherokees, for example, DO NOT powwow.  Although, in recent years, the powwow has been added to the Cherokee National Holiday and many Cherokees today do dance powwow, I used to dance jingle a LOOOOONG time ago.  It is not part of the traditional Cherokee way.  When I grew up a little more, I stopped dancing powwow becuase I wanted to stay true to the traditions of my own tribe because our ways are threatened and need to be preserved in their true form.  But that was a choice I made. 

There's absolutely nothing wrong with PODIAs attending powwows.  It's what they do when they're at them what concerns me..
If you're gonna check out a powwow, please resist the urge to try to "look NDN."  Don't wear 15 lbs of turquoise, dye your hair black and rock an orange spray tan... just... don't.  It may look fine while you're standing in the salon, but get next to a naturally brown native and it will only serve to emphasize how fake the hair and tan look.  If you're pale as Casper the friendly ghost, then be pale.  No shame in it.  Do NOT wear fake buckskin or anything with fringe. 
Just dress as you would for a day at the park.  Tee shirts, jeans and sneakers are fine for spectators.  As long as your outfit covers you up and isn't revealing or tight, you should be fine.

There are many websites which deal with powwow etiquitte, so I won't go too much into it here, but just be yourself and be respectful.  Proper manners and having plenty of respect will never steer you wrong.

Understand that traditional native communities still hold fast to tradition, protocol and even gender roles.  These things (especially the gender roles) may seem archaic to outsiders, but it is these very things which have sustained our communities and families for many generations and will continue to sustain us for generations to come. 

If you have Native blood, take the time to verify and learn about it.  Have patience and respect.  Most of all, be open minded and willing to accept not just the interesting or mystical parts, but also the inconvenient parts like having to mind your mom and gramma at 38 years old. lol

Offline Unegv Waya

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Re: For Those Who Recently Discovered Indian Ancestry
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2011, 03:35:41 am »
There are some very good words of wisdom and some excellent advice posted here.  I really like the advice about being wary of the powwow venues and some of those who frequent them.  In my experience I've found a lot of what some call "powwow NDNs" - those who only act NDN at powwows.  Away from the powwows they do nothing to follow any of the traditions.  Sort of like some church people who only act like they follow their faith on Sunday and do what ever pleases them the rest of the week.

Patience and being yourself are essential.  Like a few have said, it takes little time for an NDN to detect those who are wannabes or worse.  Those who merely are themselves, no mater how much different that may be from native ways, are the ones the NDNs will respect most.

More later.

dodadagohvi
nvwatohiyadv