Author Topic: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney  (Read 82196 times)


Offline debbieredbear

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #46 on: January 28, 2016, 09:29:27 pm »
If anyone wants to, maybe they can email the reporter on this:
http://www.oregonlive.com/marijuana/index.ssf/2016/01/native_american_church_sues_po.html#incart_2box

And point out that the group she wrote about is not Native.

Offline Sandy S

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #47 on: February 01, 2016, 12:27:33 am »
Piff sent this along to me. Scott Montgomery, who appears to be an ex-member, has produced a Youtube that is less than less than glowing and contains warnings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ti_YUXmrF5M

Quote
SUMMARY OF KEY POINTS IN THE VIDEO AND WHERE THEY CAN BE FOUND

1) [0:30] - Ayahuasca Healings are making legal claims that simply aren't true

2) [3:40] - how this movement has implications for all involved in struggles for indigenous rights, plant medicines, natural healing.

3) [5:35] - My authority on speaking about this: I was originally part of the core team of Ayahuasca Healings before leaving the group for ethical reasons very early on. Also, I have lived in Peru for several years, working with plant medicine, visiting over 20 curanderos across Peru, writing books, storytelling, seeking a life of service from the heart

4) [12:08] Four major issues that we believe Ayahuasca Healings needs to address before moving forward. At 12:45, I explain that there are no elders involved with the retreat. At 13:53 I explain that there is an absence of indigenous presence within the organization, despite the surface appearances. At 14:30, I explain that retreats are overpriced. At 16:30 I bring up concerns that there is a lack of consensus across global medicine communities that AH's approach is something that is welcomed.

5) [17:19] - Ayahuasca Healings and plant medicine communities across the planet have the potential to bring dramatic change around the world by working together. Please do not write AH off, but instead demand that Trinity, Mark, and Ayahuasca Healings make dramatic changes to their organization before moving forward.

6) [20:15] I give thanks

Offline Sandy S

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #48 on: February 04, 2016, 03:32:36 am »
Due to many hammers, the scam is starting to tumble down in Elbe:

http://reset.me/story/first-legal-ayahuasca-church/

And there is more to come. I wonder if they have a fund set aside for bail money?

Offline JJimmy

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #49 on: February 07, 2016, 04:49:49 pm »
http://www.chronline.com/church-seeks-to-offer-vision-quests-near-elbe/article_2b7dba38-cc8d-11e5-8ccf-338956d42ad8.html
Quote
Church Seeks to Offer ‘Vision Quests’ Near Elbe
Concerns: Group Uses Hallucinogens During the Course of Worship; Prosecutor Has Questions
By Jordan Nailon / jnailon@chronline.com
A new church near Elbe is hoping to facilitate “vision quests” for its members through the sacramental use of hallucinogens.
If successful, the church would be the first of its kind open to the public in the United States. Unsurprisingly, that mission has managed to catch the eye of the Lewis County Prosecutor’s Office.
On Jan. 20, the Oklevueha Native American Church of Ayahuasca Healings (also known as The Church of Ayahuasca Healings) sent an unsolicited letter to the Lewis County Prosecutor’s Office.
The letter explains in detail the spiritual intentions of the church and included documentation of the federal court cases they insist have established the right to practice their religion and imbibe of its accompanying sacraments.
Chief among those precedents is the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993, which allows the use of controlled substances for religious ceremonies.
According to Lewis County Prosecutor Jonathan Meyer, his office was first made aware of The Church of Ayahuasca Healings by a concerned citizen back in December 2015. That report went unconfirmed, though, until the church sent their own letter to the prosecutor’s office last month.
“I think they want to have the open look to them, like they have nothing to hide,” Meyer said. “They have provided some fairly legal interpretations.”
Meyer is grateful for the upfront nature of the new church.
“It’s nice that they reached out and gave us some advance notice,” said Meyer, who noted that he believes ceremonies are supposed to begin this month. “Some more notice would have been nice, but I guess you can’t look a gift horse in the mouth.”
 
Although the exact location of The Church of Ayahuasca Healings is not yet known, the letter received by the prosecutor’s offices notes that the 160-acre property is “near Elbe,” a small town on the Lewis and Pierce county line north of Mineral.
According to Meyer and Deputy Prosecutor Eric Eisenberg, the property is likely located in between Elbe and Mineral, just within the Lewis County boundary.
“It’s important to mention that we haven’t actually talked to them yet,” said Eisenberg.
Although the prosecutor’s office received the letter from the church in January, a lack of a listed phone number or physical address has slowed early efforts for a two-way dialogue.
According to Eisenberg, there are a number of issues that could ultimately cause friction between Lewis County and the church.
The stated intention of the church to provide two types of drugs listed as Schedule 1 by the federal government to their parishioners.
Eisenberg said that more mundane concerns, such as water quality, septic systems and possible building code violations, are more likely to stall the church’s quest.
Meyer and Eisenberg insisted that they are not targeting the church because of its drug affiliations.
Rather, they are simply seeking a pre-submission conference between church leaders and the community development and health divisions of county government before the church’s doors are opened to the public.
“That’s the same concern we would have with anybody,” explained Eisenberg.
 
Trinity de Guzman is listed as the president of The Church of Ayahuasca Healings. His church’s website goes into great detail about the religious protections afforded to church members seeking to use controlled substances in order to perform sacred ceremonies. In its letter to county prosecutors, the church listed the Huachuma, or San Pedro cactus (mescaline), as well as Ayahuasca (DMT), as the psychoactive substances they intend to use.
While Meyer believes that there may be a few points in the church’s argument that stretch the intent of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, he also thinks that the church is likely standing on solid ground when it comes to their position on the sacred use of hallucinogens.
“Federal law makes it clear that they can do what they are trying to do,” said Meyer, who added, “I think a court would side with a church 99 times out of 100.”

The Church of Ayahuasca Healings was officially recognized by leaders of their religion on Dec. 15, 2015. In their letter to prosecutors, the church noted “as a practical matter, it is extremely unlikely that any adverse events associated with these ceremonies will ever be on your radar screen.”
Still, the church added in the letter that they intend to take numerous steps in order to prevent any missteps in the eyes of the law.
First, participants will be subject to a lengthy interview process in order to vet their sincerity and turn away thrill seekers.
Secondly, the hallucinogenic compounds will only be administered under the observation of a church minister as part of the sacred ceremonies in order to prevent the drugs from escaping the compound.
Church members will also be required to surrender their car keys before the ceremony in order to prevent anyone from leaving early and driving under the influence.
Lastly, experienced personnel will be on hand to help to counsel or care for any persons experiencing negative effects from the drugs.
In order for a person to receive protection from prosecution, they must be an authentic member of the church. Part of the registration process is a suggested donation between $1,497 and $1,997. Limited scholarships are also available that would bring the donation amount down to $500. According to the church’s website, all donations are tax deductible.
The church’s letter to county prosecutors noted that, “Because of the special dignity offered religious exercises by RFRA, the church should not have to keep its ministry a secret.”
At this early juncture, at least one thing is for certain when it comes to The Church of Ayahuasca Healings; Their ministry is no longer a secret.


Offline debbieredbear

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2016, 05:56:39 pm »
I subscribe to the "Sicangu Scribe" Blog. Here is an excelent post:

"Mooney and Graves claim that their marijuana is considered a sacrament and was seized illegally. Marijuana is legal in Oregon, where Graves heads up a bogus NAC chapter. However, it is illegal to send marijuana through the mail. Again, the AIRFA Amendments of 1994 don’t apply to marijuana."

http://sicangulakota.net/2016/02/08/aifra-amendments-of-1994-do-not-include-marijuana/

Offline Sandy S

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #51 on: February 10, 2016, 02:57:44 am »
Oldest Native American Church to James Mooney: Marijuana Is Not Our Sacrament

Indian Country Today Media Network, 2/8/16

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/08/oldest-native-american-church-james-mooney-marijuana-not-our-sacrament-163350

Offline JJimmy

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Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #52 on: February 15, 2016, 04:27:29 pm »


http://www.chronline.com/services-are-now-in-session-for-church-offering-hallucinogens/article_bdf57074-d212-11e5-959d-af9732305a8e.html

Quote
  Posted: Friday, February 12, 2016 9:29 pm
By Jordan Nailon / jnailon@chronline.com
MINERAL — The Oklevueha Native American Church of Ayahuasca Healings is open in East Lewis County and eager to serve its growing flock of parishioners.
The newly founded enterprise, which offers its guests an opportunity to partake in the hallucinogenic Ayahuasca and Huachuma cactus teas, has so far run three retreats with a total of 32 paying visitors seeking what the owners call vision quests.
During a visit to the sprawling church property on Thursday, Marc Shackman, the CEO and “head medicine man,” or shaman, of the church, noted that the fourth retreat was scheduled to take place today and Sunday.
Shackman, 35, is a native of Kent, England. He has traveled the world and has now wound up nestled in the shadow of Mount Rainier as an unconventional church leader. The drugs used as part of his church’s religious ceremonies are considered Schedule 1 controlled substances by the federal government, but there is some legal precedent for religious protections for churches such as the Church of Ayahuasca Healings, which is the first to open in America.
Some churches have even been granted permits to operate by the Drug Enforcement Administration. The Church of Ayahuasca Healings is not among those churches, but that is not stopping Shackman and crew from moving forward with their mission.
“We’re trying to figure this out as we go along,” said Shackman, who expressed a willingness to work with the DEA. “That’s where the trust comes in.”
Shackman added that DEA certification typically comes after a church wins a costly and time-consuming court case against the government.
“If we went through a court case we’d win too, but we’re trying to avoid that,” he told The Chronicle.
The church recently sent a letter to the Lewis County Prosecutor’s Office prior to its first open ceremony in an attempt to establish a working, or at least understanding, relationship between the two parties.
“I wanted to make sure they received our letter before we started,” said Shackman.
The letter arrived only two days prior to the first retreat; but still, Shackman says, “We have nothing to hide.”
Lewis County Prosecutor Jonathan Meyer said recently that he believes the church’s position would be upheld in 99 of 100 court verdicts.
The church, located on 160 acres of bucolic retired ranch land near the border of Lewis and Pierce counties, is an independent branch of the Oklevueha Native American Church.
One accusation pointed at the church in Mineral is that they are not practicing an actual Native American religion, and moreover, the church’s owners and head spiritual leaders are not actual Native Americans.
This is not a barb that bothers Shackman much. He noted that the church shuttles in a Native American elder to run their ceremonial sweat lodge each weekend.
“And we are going to be working with more and more elder Native Americans as we go along,” he said.
What’s more, Shackman does not feel that there is a standard of ethnic authenticity required to freely practice religion in the United States.
“You’re given permission by the spirit to do what we do and a lot of people can’t understand that,” Shackman said. “The way I like to look at it is we are all Native Americans in our hearts.” It’s not “a tribe, or skin color,” issue, he said. 
“The overall mission is global,” Shackman said. “What it really comes down to is the human right to practice your religion how you like when it does so with respect and in a sacramental way.”
The setting of the church is majestic, with a creek winding through the front pasture and an intricate trail system leading up a wooded hillside to views that cast across the Cascade foothills.
The peak of Mount Rainier is said to be visible on sunny days. The church began moving onto the property in December of 2015 after an extensive search for a suitable location, and they currently have about nine months left on their lease.
Shackman says there is a possibility of purchasing the property in the future since he considers the location perfect due to its natural setting, lack of neighbors, proximity to town for supplies and its broadband connection.
Four members of the church, including a medicine woman and her 8-month-old baby, live in a farmhouse on site, and another three or four volunteers live in shacks and tents around the property.
During ceremonial retreats, the guests are housed two to a teepee by the creek. The seventh teepee was receiving its finishing touches during The Chronicle’s visit on Thursday, and the plan is to build a similar “volunteer teepee village” in an adjacent pasture.
Volunteers are asked to stick around for a three-month commitment, but that does not appear to be a strict requirement.
Mark Robilliard, 38, of Portland, said he came to the church when he “needed to change his headspace and heart space.”
Robilliard, a self-described jack of all trades, was busy finishing a teepee on Thursday, but he took time off from his duties recently to participate in the mind-altering religious sacrament of the church. He came away impressed.
“Regardless of your expectations coming in, whether you expect everything or nothing, the plant will always give you what you need,” said Robilliard. “So even if people don’t get their grand experience wind up taking something positive away from it.”
Robilliard said he had experimented with similar substances before but compared it to “kind of fumbling around in the dark,” compared with his illuminative experience at the Ayahuascas Healings Church.
Despite his positive experience, Robilliard, who arrived at the church in early January and traveled back to Portland on several occasions since, said that he is unlikely to stick around for the full three-month volunteer stint, citing his desire to be closer to his romantic partner and family.
Some people outside of the church have made claims that it is operating as a sort of cult. According to Shackman, the freedom to come and go is proof that they are not a cult.
“A cult is something that is kind of closed and brainwashing I guess. We are very free,” said Shackman. “It’s a retreat-like thing. We are a community and people choose to come here and they can be here when they want to. We don’t have a very strict dogma.”
Shackman added, “It’s just a fear-based thing where there’s a bunch of people living out in the woods drinking a substance that they don’t understand.”
One set of rules that may come as a surprise is a ban on the use of alcohol or marijuana on church property.
In fact, “A lot of the work that we are doing actually helps people with their use of marijuana,” insisted Shackman.
While Shackman believes there may be benefits to using cannabis under strict sacramental guidelines, he also believes that more often than not it is used outside of that context, thus becoming a detriment.
This is Shackman’s stance on most drugs, which he prefers to call medicine, particularly when speaking of substances like Ayahuasca, Huachuma or peyote.
“It’s important that the public make that distinction,” said Shackman. “It is not drugs. It’s a medicine.”
Part of that distinction is derived from the process of imbibing. Visitors to the church only partake of the sacramental substances during one day of their visit.
“We are one of the first ones to say that this isn’t about the high. It is really a good medicine for the people,” said Shackman.
A typical retreat begins on Friday when visitors acclimate, cleanse and rest up. The medicinal ceremony occurs on Saturday, with Sunday set aside for visitors to “ground down,” recover and then go home.
“It’s about quality not quantity,” explained Shackman. “We’re here to give people a very quick burst through the clouds that hang over a lot of people.”
Shackman maintains that one of the greatest distinctions between sacrament and recreation is a person’s intent and commitment to their experience. He acknowledged that a lot of Americans have experimented with substances such as marijuana, mushrooms or LSD, but rarely are those trips undertaken with spiritual guidance, which leaves the experience up to the unpredictable whims of the world and individual users, which typically leads to less than productive results.
“It’s really about your state of mind and how you’re guided,” insisted Shackman.
The natural element of the church’s sacramental substances of choice is another critical distinction for the shaman.
“These things grow from the ground for a reason,” said Shackman. “You’ve got to respect the plant. These powerful medicines are not a toy.”
According to Shackman, one of the lasting lessons that most people learn from their experience is that, “You can get there yourself without anything external. Which is quite empowering because Ayahuasca might not always be there.”
Of experienced parishioners, Shackman added, “Plant medicine literally becomes their ally. They’ll never lose that throughout their whole lives and they’ll pass that onto others that they come in contact with. … Every person we send out there makes this work worth it. It makes the risk worth it.”
Shackman says he began drinking plant medicines in 2008 and became comfortable calling himself a shaman in 2012 after he received his spiritual name, Kumooja Banyan Tree, during a visit to Mexico. Now he is the CEO of his own church. That term, CEO, has drawn criticism from some who say that it is clear proof that his church is a sham, profit-making operation.
Of course, Shackman sees things differently.
Traditionally, Shackman explained, the top three positions in a Ayahuasca church would be called stone carrier’s one, two and three, but his church decided to go with CEO, president, etc. “We need those because when we go to set up a bank account we obviously can’t use stone carrier,” laughed Shackman. “You could also use minister, but it’s not really about the words.”
To those that scoff at the nearly $2,000 price tag for the retreat, and there are many, Shackman again had an answer at hand.
“Money is energy. On a ground level you need energy to do what you need to do.”
He added, “Being a spiritual person but also broke is a little bit dispiriting to me because you have all of these ideas but yet you can’t do any of it.”
In any case, Shackman admitted, “You’re never going to convince anyone of that unless they’ve been here and experienced it.”
That’s exactly what Shackman hopes to do more of.
Asked what he would do if law enforcement decided to try to usurp the power he believes he is entitled to, he said, “It’s always a balance. We’re not here to break laws, but we’re not here to be complete followers either. We’re trying to push boundaries a little bit.”
Shackman added, “Besides, we must be doing something right, otherwise we would have already been arrested.”l

Offline Sandy S

  • Posts: 258
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #53 on: February 19, 2016, 09:04:45 am »
Piff sent me this in regard to the frauds operating in Elbe, Washington:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/18/national-council-does-not-condone-faux-native-american-churches-or-marijuana-use-163464#.VsZyjAsUAZk.mailto

Quote
National Council Does Not Condone Faux Native American Churches or Marijuana Use
Native American Churches

2/18/16

There is a growing trend in the United States, of organizations adopting the name “Native American Church” as a means of trying to obtain the protection of federal law, which was established by the government to recognize and protect the legitimate indigenous religions that have prospered on the North American continent since long before European settlers arrived.

In the case of the Peyote Religion, archaeological and ethnographic evidence demonstrates its presence in North America for more than 10,000 years. However, organizations and individuals claiming protection under the umbrella of these organizations want to capitalize on this ancient practice despite having no connection to it whatsoever.

Some of these illegitimate organizations, comprised of non-Native people, are now claiming that marijuana, ayahuasca and other substances are part of Native American Church theology and practice. Nothing could be further from the truth. We, the National Council of Native American Churches are now stepping forward to advise the public that we do not condone the activities of these illegitimate organizations.

The National Council of Native American Churches consists of legitimate, indigenous member organizations that include the Native American Church of North America, the Azzee’ Bee Nahaga of Diné Nation, the Native American Church of the State of Oklahoma, the Native American Church of the State of South Dakota, and invited Leaders of the Consejo Regional Wixarika of Mexico. We member organizations of the National Council speak for all of our chapters and the individual members of the chapters on this matter of national importance.

Federal laws protecting legitimate, indigenous Native American Churches have a long and purposeful history. Back in our history, there was a time when our spiritual beliefs were outlawed. People were jailed, put in insane asylums and killed for participating in the Sun Dance and other ceremonies. This, too, includes taking peyote as our sacrament. Federal laws enacted first in the late 1970s were intended to protect our right to practice our religion. We oppose the attempts of non-Natives to come in and misuse government protection of traditional Native American religion to conduct illegal activity that has nothing to do with our traditional ways.

We do not recognize, condone, or allow the use of marijuana, or any other substance other than peyote, in any of our religious services. To the contrary, the only plant that serves as a sacrament is peyote, and without peyote, our ceremonies cannot take place. We reject and condemn any claim by these illegitimate organizations that marijuana or any other plant serves or has ever served as a sacrament in addition to peyote in indigenous Native American Church ceremonies.

To the extent that the claims of any of these organizations rest on allegations or inferences of an affiliation with traditional Native American Church organizations or with any legitimate chapter of the Native American Church, such claims should be rejected. The mere use of the term Native American Church does not entitle any of these illicit organizations to any legal protection under federal law.

We know who we are, and we know where we come from. We know the atrocities visited upon us. We reject the attempts to grasp onto our indigenous ways and deceive the public by claiming them as their own for their own personal enjoyment or for profit.

The National Council of Native American Churches wrote this letter on February 13. It was signed by Sandor Iron Rope, President?Native American Church of North America; Steven Benally, President?Azzee’ Bee Nahagha of Dine Nation; Charles Haag, President?Native American Church of the State of Oklahoma; Albert Red Bear, Jr., President?Native American Church of the State of South Dakota Native; and Santos De La Cruz Carrillo, Consejo Regional Wixarika Mexico.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/02/18/national-council-does-not-condone-faux-native-american-churches-or-marijuana-use-163464#.VsZyjAsUAZk.mailto

Offline KIS

  • Posts: 21
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #54 on: February 20, 2016, 07:05:28 pm »
This article appeared at the link listed below.
http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/national-council-of-native-american-churches-on-peyote-and-marijuana/
*****************
The following statement by the Native American Churches was released in a letter form, dated February 13, 2016

There is a growing trend in the United States, of organizations adopting the name “Native American Church” as a means of trying to obtain the protection of federal law which was established by the government to recognize and protect the legitimate indigenous religions that have prospered on the North American continent since long before European settlers arrived.

In the case of the Peyote Religion, archaeological and ethnographic evidence demonstrates its presence in North America for more than 10,000 years. However, organizations and individuals claiming protection under the umbrella of these organizations want to capitalize on this ancient practice despite having no connection to it whatsoever.

Some of these illegitimate organizations, comprised of non-Native people, are now claiming that marijuana, ayahuasca and other substances are part of Native American Church theology and practice. Nothing could be further from the truth. We, the National Council of Native American Churches are now stepping forward to advise the public that we do not condone the activities of these illegitimate organizations.

The National Council of Native American Churches consists of legitimate, indigenous member organizations that include the Native American Church of North America, the Azzee’ Bee Nahaga of Dine Nation, the Native American Church of the State of Oklahoma the Native American Church of the State of South Dakota, and invited Leaders of the Consejo Regional Wixarika of Mexico. We member organizations of the National Council speak for all of our chapters and the individual members of the chapters on this matter of national importance.

Federal laws protecting legitimate, indigenous Native American Churches have a long and purposeful history. Back in our history, there was a time when our spiritual beliefs were outlawed. People were jailed, put in insane asylums and killed for participating in the Sun Dance and other ceremonies. This, too, includes taking peyote as our sacrament. Federal laws enacted first in the late 1970s were intended to protect our right to practice our religion. We oppose the attempts of non-Natives to come in and misuse government protection of traditional Native American religion to conduct illegal activity that has nothing to do with our traditional ways.


WE DO NOT RECOGNIZE, CONDONE, OR ALLOW THE USE OF MARIJUANA, OR ANY OTHER SUBSTANCE OTHER THAN PEYOTE, IN ANY OF OUR RELIGIOUS SERVICES. TO THE CONTRARY, THE ONLY PLANT THAT SERVES AS A SACRAMENT IS PEYOTE, AND WITHOUT PEYOTE, OUR CEREMONIES CANNOT TAKE PLACE. WE REJECT AND CONDEMN ANY CLAIM BY THESE ILLEGITIMATE ORGANIZATIONS THAT MARIJUANA OR ANY OTHER PLANT SERVES OR HAS EVER SERVED AS A SACRAMENT IN ADDITION TO PEYOTE IN INDIGENOUS NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH CEREMONIES.

To the extent that the claims of any of these organizations rest on allegations or inferences of an affiliation with traditional Native American Church organizations or with any legitimate chapter of the Native American Church, such claims should be rejected. The mere use of the term Native American Church does not entitle any of these illicit organizations to any legal protection under federal law.
We know who we are, and we know where we come from. We know the atrocities visited upon us. We reject the attempts to grasp onto our indigenous ways and deceive the public by claiming them as their own for their own personal enjoyment or for profit.
DATED this 13th day of February, 2016
______________________________________
Sandor Iron Rope, President
Native American Church of North America
DATED this 13th day of February, 2016
______________________________________
Steven Benally, President
Azzee’ Bee Nahaga of Dine Nation
DATED this 13th day of February, 2016
______________________________________
Charles Haag, President
Native American Church of the State of Oklahoma
DATED this 13th day of February, 2016
______________________________________
Albert Red Bear, Jr., President
Native American Church of the State of South Dakota Native 4
 

Offline Sandy S

  • Posts: 258
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #55 on: March 09, 2016, 11:53:16 pm »
My information is not from primary sources, but it seems the Elbe group has run into some, er, problems and have been forced to suspend operations-- the way US Presidential candidates like Rick Santorum "suspend" their campaign. This has left clients who have already paid $1500 not only for retreat fees but also non-refundable airline tickets high and dry. OK, I meant just dry.

That's the word I am hearing from our old NAFPS friend.


Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 1230
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #56 on: March 11, 2016, 09:34:38 am »
I quoted from a couple of posts here in this thread, and started a new topic:

Ayahuasca Healings Native American Church (AHNAC).

In the present thread, I'll post what that so-called "Church" writes about "Oklevueha Native American Church" and James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney. The formatting of the originals are not faithfully reproduced, there are videos and clickable links over there.

Oklevueha Native American Church

Oklevueha Native American Church (ONAC) is a United States federally recognized indigenous American Native Earth Based Healing and Empowerment Church.  ONAC is a unification of Lakota Sioux and Oklevueha Seminole Spiritual Traditions.   Lakota Sioux Chief Richard ‘He Who Holds the Foundation’ Swallow and Oklevueha Seminole Medicine Man, James Warren ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney welcome you with open arms regardless of your race, gender, age, social position, religious back ground and/or financial status.  All are welcome into our sacred healing and empowering  indigenous spiritual community.

Oklevueha Native American Church supports making  Indigenous Ceremonies and Oklevueha Native American Church Sacraments available to all people. This purpose is sustained historically by many indigenous American Native peoples and other indigenous cultures around the world.  ONAC believes that participation in these sacred ceremonies will enhance ones ability to embrace the following human attributes:

FAITH: Trust, belief, confidence and hopefulness
RESPECT: Esteem, deference, politeness and civility,
HONOR: Integrity, honesty, goodness and decency,
CHARITY: Goodwill, compassion, kindheartedness and public-spiritedness,
FORGIVENESS: Pardon, exonerate and feel no resentment toward,
HUMILITY:  Modesty, humbleness, meekness and diffidence,
GRATITUDE: Gratefulness, thankfulness, and appreciation.
 
One mission of Oklevueha Native American Church is to maintain the integrity of bona fide American Native indigenous ceremonies, thus assisting the indigenous peoples to retain their culture and those of other races to receive the benefits of those cultures and understandings.

The Lakota Sioux Nation and Oklevueha Seminole spiritual traditions merged their two indigenous earth based healing and empowering traditions, December 17, 2007. The original agreement named this merging of American Native spiritual traditions, Oklevueha Lakota Sioux Nation Native American Church, now known as Oklevueha Native American Church (ONAC).

The merging of these two spiritual traditions honors the courageous heritage of the Oglala and Lakota Sioux Nations, and the Oklevueha Seminole Colony of American Native traditions.  It created a synergy, bringing together the best of both cultures.

The Oglala and Lakota Sioux spiritual leaders Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and Fool Bull (Native Americans) maintained their spiritual traditions with a tenacious commitment to their American Native culture through honoring and respecting Mother Earth and Father Sky.   Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull were murdered primarily as a result of their unwavering commitment to honor their American Native way of life.  Fool Bull wisely and tenaciously weaved his traditional medicine spiritual ways and laid foundations that allowed the legal protection of American Native spirituality. This he did in spite of the corrupt politics of the reservation world and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This weaving enabled his descendants of Sioux spiritual traditions such as Leslie Fool Bull and Richard ‘He Who Has the Foundation’ Swallow to survive in the reservation world and defend and sustain their culture.

Osceola, Quanah Parker, and James Mooney maintained the Oklevueha Seminole spiritual traditions, in secret, on and off of Federally Recognized Indian Reservations.  The reason for the secrecy was that, if the people that carried these traditions were revealed, they would have been murdered.  In the 1800’s, there were bounties placed on all Seminoles that did not reside on federally recognized Indian reservations.  If a government agent of the United States were to kill, and turn in a severed Seminole head, they would receive as much as $200.00. In the 1800’s, this was a massive amount of money.

The Seminole spiritual traditions are embedded in a multitude of indigenous cultures.  The Seminole indigenous spiritual tradition traces its beliefs to Central America, primarily in the vicinity of Guatemala.  Because of the infusion of escaped slaves mostly from plantations of Georgia, the indigenous spirituality of African indigenous people is included in Seminole spirituality.  With the melding of Irish and Scottish misfits into the Seminole culture came indigenous Gaelic traditions. The Seminole melting pot of earth based healing and empowering spiritual traditions is indeed rich and varied.

One reason for the survival of these indigenous spiritual traditions is based on the ability of the followers to listen to, and follow the promptings of the heart in the ‘moment’.  They could not have survived the onslaught of atrocities with one set of practices for each one of their indigenous ceremonies. It is also reasonable to conclude that women (Matriarch) are the true caretakers of the indigenous medicines and the men (Patriarch) are the protector of the medicines.

The seemingly divergent traditions of the staunch Lakota Sioux ceremonial ways, and the fluid, spiritual traditions of the Seminoles makes the merging of these two indigenous earth based ways flexible and applicable to today’s spiritual healing practitioners.  A study of the Oklevueha Native American Church Oklevueha Native American Church – Code of Ethics makes the merging of these two spiritual traditions inviting to seekers of the truth who desire to know the essence of who they are, and where their original traditions blossomed.

Read Other Articles to understand the Native American Church more thoroughly: Oklevueha Native American Church – History, The Native American Church {First Nation}, and The Racist War Against The American Native Culture.

In this quote, only the part about James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney:

What about everything with James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney?

Some of you may be aware that Elder Medicine Man, James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney, of the Oklevueha Native American Church, said some things about our organization’s legality.

As of Dec 10, 2015, all of those statements, and anything “negative” that he may have said have been recalled, and instead replaced with nothing but honor, recognition, deep gratitude & respect for what we are doing. He sees our heart, our purest intentions, and that everything we do is truly for the service and healing of the planet, and he is now one of our greatest allies.

In fact, we have been in communication with James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney every day this past week, receiving his guidance, as he took us by the hand, to show us exactly what we needed to do in order to receive the highest level of legal protection, and have unquestionable legal rights to do what we are doing, in bringing Ayahuasca to America, legally, and openly to the public.

We followed his guidance, which is what instigated us to take down our website and redesign it to be much more in alignment with our values, and as a result of the incredibly arduous & intense past week, we have earned James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney and the Oklevueha Native American Church’s full blessing.

This Blessing, that took place on Dec 10, 2015, was one of the most pivotal moments of this entire movement, and guarantees our unshakable and unquestionable right, and legal protection, to be doing what we are doing.

This is a video recording of James ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney and the Oklevueha NAC blessing our Ayahuasca Healings Church in America:

Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 1230
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2016, 10:04:10 am »
The video referred to at the very bottom of my foregoing post is on YouTube (45 minutes):

Legal Ayahuasca Healings Church in America - Blessing by James 'Flaming Eagle' Mooney, ONAC

Published Dec. 12, 2015
Legal Ayahuasca Healings Church in America: https://ayahuascahealings.com

This Blessing from James 'Flaming Eagle' Mooney was given on Dec 10, 2015, from the Oklevueha Native American Church, to the Ayahuasca Healings Church in America.

This Blessing gives the complete legal protection of the Native American Church, to our Ayahuasca Healings Church, and all it's members to be able to sit with Mother Ayahuasca in America, legally.

How is there a legal Ayahuasca Church in America? The full answer can be found here:
https://ayahuascahealings.com/ayahuasca-church-in-usa-how-are-we-legal/

The trippers who constitute the team of the "Ayahuasca Healings Church" present themselves. They are also presented here:

https://ayahuascahealings.com/the-team/

Offline Sandy S

  • Posts: 258
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #58 on: March 15, 2016, 03:35:58 pm »
The Elbe group has run into a little trouble.

https://ayahuascahealings.com/important-public-announcement-ayahuasca-healings/

Quote
Important Public Announcement – Ayahuasca Healings Church in America

Written March 8, 2016, by Trinity de Guzman:

A week ago, I came back from the jungles of Peru.

5 ceremonies in 9 days.

Lifetimes experienced.

I went, humbly, asking for guidance.

For vision.

For clarity.

What I received was more beautiful than anything I ever expected.

Not only did we receive the blessing from the indigenous who have been working with the medicine for thousands of years…

(Video will be released soon)

But I received the clarity on how to proceed.

For us all.

For this movement.

For this Church, and all we are here to bring to the world.

And most importantly, for each and every one of you, the family we are here to serve, and the community whom, together, we really WILL create the world we’ve come here to create…

The clarity comes two-fold:

1) We are expanding our focus to serve you, guide you & support you, without the use of plant medicines.

Plant medicine – these blessed teachers & Spirits, Ayahuasca, San Pedro, Peyote, Iboga, to name a few…

I’ve never found anything that can help people heal, so quickly, so deeply, helping us re-hardwire our beliefs & thought patterns overnight…

While coming back to our Divine Remembering, connecting to Source, Spirit, and the eternal joy that lives within each of us.

Although I’ve never found anything as powerful, Ayahuasca is just ONE path.

As a Native American Church, we are here to help bring you back… to You. With or without plant medicine. Shedding the layers that no longer serve, healing what you need to inside…

And come back to this state of feeling ALIVE. Happy, joyous, grateful, on purpose, truly making the world a better place for us all!

So stay tuned over the next 2 weeks as we release more information on exactly what this means.

And what we are building to be able to serve & support you, above and beyond the use of plant medicine.

Hint: Remember, we all want the same thing!

To make the world a better place. And to be happy.

Simple.

What we create will bring us together more powerfully than anything we’ve ever shared with you.

And you can start to see, exactly what your next steps are, to grow personally, and make the difference you came here to make.

If you would like to be a part of this movement, click here to join the Global Healing Community.

More on that soon!

2) The second, and most important point is this:

We are working closely with an amazing attorney who is helping us receive our DEA Exemption.

After my time in the jungle, I am now ready to surrender to the changes madre asks of us, which is, as always, for the best interest of us all.

Read: Ayahuasca Healings Church – Public Statement, March 8, 2016

Remember, everything happens to serve us, and this is one massive leap of PROGRESS for us all.

We will continue from here without skipping a beat, and will only increase the value and service that we give to the public and our community.

Right now, please, we simply ask: for your prayers.

For your positive intentions.

May we receive this exemption. Easily. Quickly.

Thank you for your support, in every way possible!

Stay tuned, we’ll share more soon!

[To Be Continued..]

With infinite love, always here to serve, no matter what,
Trinity de Guzman & The Ayahuasca Healings Family

PS – I want to re-iterate. For those of you who are already registered for future retreats:

We are NOT cancelling your retreats.

We are simply re-scheduling them to a date after we receive the DEA exemption. And we have something special for you, to apologize for any inconveniences.

Please stay tuned to your email inbox for the next steps!

Exciting times! Really!

This is here to serve us all, so powerfully!

Talk soon!!
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The following update was available for public viewing just a couple hours ago, but now I can't find it for some reason. Fortunately it was captured before vanishing. It is available via Google cache for the moment. I believe the victims here dished out at least $1500 smackers each. Enjoy!:

https://ayahuascahealings.com/public-announcement-followup-message-mar-10-2016/ (Dead right now)

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:IXB09oqD-bUJ:ayahuascahealings.com/public-announcement-followup-message-mar-10-2016/+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us (Google cache)

Quote
Public Announcement: Followup Message – Mar 10, 2016

Blessings to all!

We understand that there are several of you who have booked retreats with us, and are upset about the re-scheduling of your retreats, without the opportunity for a refund.

This is where we need to kindly, humbly, and deeply, ask you for your support and help, during the time we need it most.

This is a group, family, community endeavor and movement. Without any of you, none of this would be possible.

People all over America, who need this healing, who are lost, feeling trapped by society, not knowing what to do, or where to go with their lives…

Thousands, millions, of people are in pain. Looking for answers. Looking for help. Looking for peace and happiness.

This is why we are so guided to bring this medicine to America. We see how badly it is needed.

And we know, this is what many of you are struggling with, which is why you were called to the medicine in the first place.

And this is what we are here to help you with.

With these beautiful, unexpected, turn of events, it seems clear, that this is order:

First, without plant medicine. To build the foundation.

Then, when the time is right, adding plant medicine to take your healing journey to levels and dimensions so much more powerful than words can describe.

Look at this like a gift.

Instead of jumping into a world of spiritual-revelations, that people might see for a night, and then quickly forget…

You have the opportunity to create a foundation. To prepare yourself. For the most transformational journey that is destined for you.

Don’t rush the process. You will have your ceremony, when you are meant to.

This is a gift.

This time between now and when you experience the medicine, is a blessing in disguise.

Allow yourself to start to see it that way, and miracles will present themselves to you.

To emphasize, we are NOT cancelling the retreats. Only rescheduling them to a later date.

We ask for your surrender to this process.

Look at this as a training ground, to practice trust & surrender. A gift in itself.

We WILL lead you through the most transformational healing journey of your entire life.

If you allow us to.

If you can surrender to this all, and see that everything is truly happening to serve you, us, and this movement, in the highest.

The bottom line is this:

We are here to bring so much love, light, healing, truth, and opening of hearts, to so many people, across the globe.

But the only way we can do that, is TOGETHER.

And the time it’s most important to stick together, is when it’s hardest. Like right now.

You are a part of this because you are meant to be.

There are no accidents.

What is happening to you, is no mistake.

Everything that is meant to happen, will happen.

And what is happening now, was meant to happen.

For the benefit, the healing, and the awakening of so many countless beings.

It’s all unfolding exactly the way it’s meant to.

When you surrender to this experience, without reacting in anger, you can begin to see…

Everything is happening the way it is meant to. Even though we might not understand exactly why.

Please. We need your support.

The only way this will work, is together.

In order for this movement of healing to live on, your prayers, your allowing and acceptance of “what is”, and your trust, is the golden key to this all.

And remember, everything is energy.

Energy always balances itself out.

What you give, will always be returned to you. Many times over. It’s a simple law of the Universe.

We will do everything we possibly can, to return to you, the value that you are providing to this movement. And so much more.

But really leave that to the Universe. Great Spirit. The Higher Power that brought us together in the first place.

The energy you donate to this cause, to this movement, to the healing and awakening of so many people… will return to you, in more beautiful ways than you could ever dream up.

If you trust.

If you surrender.

And if you remember, that there are no accidents.

You are an integral part, to this million piece puzzle, of the awakening of us all.

It might not be a smooth ride…

But nobody ever said it would be. ;)

It’s what we came here for. We’re just playing our roles.

And we are doing everything we can, and then some, to make sure you are supported in every way you can be.

Because at the end of the day, do you want Ayahuasca?

Or do you want the peace, liberation, freedom, love, and long-term way of living, in alignment with your true purpose & service to the world?

We know it’s the latter. So look at the money you have donated, as a massive investment towards YOURSELF.

We will support you in ways that you have never been supported before. And this money you have donated, will be one of the greatest gifts, you could have ever given yourself.

We are offering, and delivering, a coaching program, or more so, a Global Healing Community, that will be worth the money you have donated, and so much more.

Stay tuned, to realize how much this will really serve you.

We apologize deeply for any inconvenience this has brought you.

The only way through this, is trust. And expect to see the beauty that is waiting to reveal itself, on the other side.

The only way this will succeed, the only way we can bring this life-changing healing plant sacrament, Mother Ayahuasca, to America, and all those who need it, is through your continued support.

This is how to help:

We ask for your belief.

We ask for your trust.

We ask for your sweet surrender, knowing that the money you have donated, is supporting so many people’s healing journey. Most of all, your own.

We will be in communication with all of you who are scheduled for upcoming retreats, via phone.

To ensure everything is as clear as possible, to build the personal connection, and to make sure that you are truly happy with your interactions with our Church.

Thank you so much for your support during this time that we need it most.

We understand that this is hard for you, as it is difficult for us as well, but please, we need to stick together.

Keep our eyes on the big vision. And remember, we came here to build this, together.

Thank you again, and we look forward to communicating with you personally, in more detail.

With the deepest gratitude, surrendering in love to every moment,
Trinity de Guzman & The Ayahuasca Healings Family

PS – We want to be clear. The reason we are not able to issue refunds, is two-fold:

1) We have re-invested all of the donations we have received into the Church, and Spiritual Healing Center, in Elbe.

As well, the operating expenses of leading a movement like this, with how many people are involved, and how many lives are being changed, has left us in a position, where we do not have money saved to pay back refunds.

When you ask for a refund, it puts a financial strain on us, that may add up to this whole thing falling apart. To be completely honest.

I don’t believe that will happen. But it’s to put it in perspective.

It’s not like we simply do not want to issue refunds. If we had the means to, of course, we would love to, for those who are really adamant about it.

But honestly, we do not have the resources to do so. And if we want this to succeed, we can not put that type of stress on the organization right now.

The second reason is…

2) As expressed on our Ayahuasca Healing Retreat info page, and in our Terms & Conditions:

- You are not paying a price for a retreat. You are not paying for a product or service. It is not an exchange of money, where you give us ____$, and then we give you a retreat.

- The money you send us is a donation, and is therefor non-refundable.

- The donation is to support our Church’s Vision & Mission, to share healing & awakening with the world.

- The retreat is shared with you, as a thank you, and as a healing service we offer. This operates as a fundraising activity of our Church.

Based on these points, we are unable to issue refunds, and we, again, apologize so deeply, for this unexpected turn of events.

Again, we simply ask you to look at this like a gift, because there is no doubt it is.

And this is happening, to serve us all.

Thank you again so much, for your continued support, love, acceptance, allowing, and total embrace, of life as it is.

This journey together is powerful!

It will teach you so much about yourself, if you let it.

Because after all… that’s the essence of this journey, and what it really means to heal.

We pray you are receiving the lessons, just as we are!
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There's a Spaghetti Western called I quattro dell'Ave Maria, aka, Ace High. In it, Eli Wallach plays a bandit who relieves a couple of guys of their money. As he does so, he utters the following words, which seem appropriate here:

Quote
Money corrupts men, it softens him. So to keep you young and pure, I think I'll take everything.

Offline Sparks

  • Posts: 1230
Re: James "Flaming Eagle" Mooney
« Reply #59 on: March 15, 2016, 08:03:32 pm »
The Elbe group has run into a little trouble.

https://ayahuascahealings.com/important-public-announcement-ayahuasca-healings/
[…]
The following update was available for public viewing just a couple hours ago, but now I can't find it for some reason. Fortunately it was captured before vanishing. It is available via Google cache for the moment. I believe the victims here dished out at least $1500 smackers each. Enjoy!:

https://ayahuascahealings.com/public-announcement-followup-message-mar-10-2016/ (Dead right now)

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:IXB09oqD-bUJ:ayahuascahealings.com/public-announcement-followup-message-mar-10-2016/+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us (Google cache)

I already quoted and commented upon most of this stuff a few days ago, in my new topic:

I quoted from a couple of posts here in this thread, and started a new topic:

Ayahuasca Healings Native American Church (AHNAC).