Author Topic: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen  (Read 7726 times)

apukjij

  • Guest
this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« on: October 04, 2010, 07:06:26 am »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQat2g6vE4Q
it looks like buddy thinks hes in a strip club and is trying to put money in the Jingle Dancers Regalia!

apukjij

  • Guest
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2010, 07:07:43 am »
watching it over again i guess hes throwing the money at their feet, not trying to put it in their regalia....

Offline dabosijigwokush

  • Posts: 265
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2010, 05:47:45 pm »
i have a few questions
why was this person allowed in to the dance circle, he was not dancing
why does there have to be money in the circle, do they throw money at the Church Choirs feet
why does this look like prostitution, he could waited till they came out to gift them
when is the dance circle going to be treated like it is a church, a place to pray in dance
there should be a tip jar at the outside of the dance circle
when is powwow going to stop being a flea market with entertainment
or at least stop calling it a powwow and call it for what it is, A SHOW

Offline wolfhawaii

  • Posts: 293
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2010, 04:05:02 am »
A powwow is considered a social gathering, not a ceremony, and puttting money at the dancer's feet is considered to be honoring them at many gatherings. I have witnessed and done this myself many times, and have seen many highly respected native people do this.

apukjij

  • Guest
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2010, 02:05:17 pm »
ty wolfhawaii, i have not seen this, but i am not much of a powwow person, thanks for the clarification.

Offline E.P. Grondine

  • Posts: 401
    • Man and Impact in the Americas
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2010, 07:49:32 pm »
A powwow is considered a social gathering, not a ceremony, and putting money at the dancer's feet is considered to be honoring them at many gatherings. I have witnessed and done this myself many times, and have seen many highly respected native people do this.

wolfhawaii, all that I've been told and seen agrees completely with what you wrote. I would add that usually the jingle dancers themselves do not pick up the money, but rather an assistant comes around after the dance and picks it up, or sometimes they will take it at the arena entrance.

I am on dial up, so I can not view the video here.

Offline karen mica

  • Posts: 34
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2010, 01:40:45 am »
For E.P. Grondine:

I went out and bought "Man and Impact in the Americas" and find it to be a fascinating read so far.
I am just starting page 333 and was curious as to why no mention yet of the Carolina Bays, or other significant impact sites to the north? 
 
It`s good to see this subject finally getting the attention it deserves though.
 
One thing I don`t understand, is why it is thought that native people or any people for that matter, would consider comets or meteors to be anything other then what they are.
Considering what the technology was, thousands of years ago, and what people understood about building with rock, particular alignments etc, why would they assume that meteors were "gods" anymore then we would today?
That just doesn`t make sense to me. And even if one area was devastated, there were other areas that were not, so people should have been able to retain much information even after an event.
 
Seems that there should be more to the story.
And since impacts are cyclical more or less, people should have retained a greater memory of this whole cataclysm business, then they do.
 
 

Offline E.P. Grondine

  • Posts: 401
    • Man and Impact in the Americas
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2010, 07:46:21 pm »
Hi Karen -

I don't know if this is the proper place to answer your questions, and I thought about replying in a PM. Perhaps E.I. will consider moving it, but since you asked here, I'll answer here.

We don't know yet if the Carolina Bays are connected with the YD impact of 10,900 BCE or with an earlier and more massive impact.

As far as the ancestors ways of considering them, they did not use the scientific words we use today. There is no reason to expect them to, just as there is no reason to expect that other ancient peoples did.

Among the Iroquoian, it was "kahastenens", among Algonquian "m'si piase" (great cat) and variants. The best way to consider ancient knowledge of them is as forces of nature, and too often dangerous ones at that.

The ancestors' memories of the catastrophies were largely ignored, treated as merely being "myths", as were their histories.

Enjoy the book, and please PM me if you have any additional questions, so that we can leave this forum focused on the cons who predate on people today.

For E.P. Grondine:

I went out and bought "Man and Impact in the Americas" and find it to be a fascinating read so far.
I am just starting page 333 and was curious as to why no mention yet of the Carolina Bays, or other significant impact sites to the north? 
 
It`s good to see this subject finally getting the attention it deserves though.
 
One thing I don`t understand, is why it is thought that native people or any people for that matter, would consider comets or meteors to be anything other then what they are.
Considering what the technology was, thousands of years ago, and what people understood about building with rock, particular alignments etc, why would they assume that meteors were "gods" anymore then we would today?
That just doesn`t make sense to me. And even if one area was devastated, there were other areas that were not, so people should have been able to retain much information even after an event.
 
Seems that there should be more to the story.
And since impacts are cyclical more or less, people should have retained a greater memory of this whole cataclysm business, then they do.

Offline karen mica

  • Posts: 34
Re: this is the weirdest thing i ever seen
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2010, 11:19:13 pm »
Thank you for responding so quickly and for the offer to PM you for more details.

You don`t see that very often!

I will finish the book first then PM, if I have further questions.

There is so much information here.. it`s just amazing!