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71
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin, Professor
« Last post by educatedindian on April 16, 2022, 01:03:09 am »
I came here to politely request that you do not speak on behalf of Ojibwes if you are not one. I am one. And that is also the harm done here. Noori has spoken on behalf of our people and our language and has mined community elders to build her resume and she is not Native. Not one ounce. There are other voices that speak on behalf of themselves, and that is our way.

Thank you to everyone in this forum who has contributed.

I learn my language from my elders and my family. We absolutely do not need a non-Native person teaching our language.

Hello, I never claimed to speak for anyone else. But we can all see plenty of support for Noodin among Ojibwe, most of all from her many students and the many elders she's worked with.

Bolding above and below is mine.

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https://ojibwe.lib.umn.edu/about-ojibwe-language
The variety of Ojibwe used in the Ojibwe People's Dictionary is the Central Southwestern Ojibwe spoken in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Canadian border lakes communities. Today, it is spoken mainly by elders over the age of 70. Ethnologue reports 5,000 speakers of Southwestern Chippewa (Lewis, 2009), but a 2009 language census by language activists Keller Paap and Anton Treuer shows approximately 1,000 speakers in Minnesota and Wisconsin, with most located in the Red Lake community of Ponemah (Treuer, 2009).

The UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger lists Ojibwe in Minnesota as “severely endangered” and defines it as a language “spoken by grandparents and older generations; while the parent generation may understand it, they do not speak it to children or among themselves,” (UNESCO, 2010).

Revitalization efforts are underway, with immersion schools operating in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Ojibwe has a growing number of second-language speakers, and the language is taught in many secondary and post-secondary classrooms throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and Ontario.

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That's 6,000 speakers out of over 300,000 Ojibwe. Less than 2% fluent, most of them over 70.

I can't think of a single example of anyone else, outside this thread, ever saying you must be of that people to teach the language, and I don't think anyone else can either. Does anyone remember a white teacher being fired or barred from teaching Spanish, Japanese, etc?

I never heard of Dineh, Hopi, or O'odham requiring Indian Only for the language programs when I was at ASU. The CNO doesn't do this either.

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https://anadisgoi.com/index.php/culture-stories/751-cherokee-nation-hiring-10-new-teachers-to-help-with-expansion-of-cherokee-language-program-immersion-school
Cherokee Nation needs 10 certified teachers, including one who has a special education certification. Applicants are not currently required to speak Cherokee but will be trained as part of the program.

“Preserving the Cherokee language and growing the number of Cherokee speakers is critical to the Cherokee Nation’s future,” Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “This will continue to be our priority, which is why I recently announced that we will create a second Cherokee language immersion school under the umbrella of the Cherokee Language Department. To help with these language preservation and perpetuation efforts, we need to hire new teachers who can help us achieve our goals. We will provide them with all of the tools and training they need to succeed while working with our language program.”

Many of the tribe’s current state-certified teaching staff are at or near the age of retirement, so the new teachers will help fill the gaps being left by those who are retiring, as well as fill the new jobs being created by expansion of the Cherokee language program.

“Education is such a critical component of our mission to not only save our beautiful Cherokee language, but to create an environment where the language grows into the daily lives of Cherokee society once again,” Deputy Chief Bryan Warner said. “We can and will accomplish this goal, and we’ll start by bringing in teachers who are committed to helping shape the minds of young Cherokees. These certified teaching careers are great opportunities for our educators.”

Those hired by the Cherokee Nation will go through approximately 30 months of training including 24 continuous months of Cherokee language learning within the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program, along with six months of immersion school teaching methodology training and the study of other successful immersion school systems.

“We are asking anyone with the right heart and who are certified teachers to enlist with us to save our language,” Cherokee Nation Language Department Executive Director Howard Paden said. “Whoever applies will be asked to develop with us so they can become a more efficient Cherokee teacher. That way, we can do everything together, in unity, to preserve our Cherokee language. If anyone out there feels like they have the heart to get this accomplished, please apply today or reach out to us in the Cherokee Language Department and ask questions.”
72
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Last post by educatedindian on April 16, 2022, 12:51:57 am »
Here's an interesting article about cultural appropriation within context of non-natives profiting off of learning native languages.

https://medium.com/literature-and-social-change/give-me-back-my-language-d8244c817067

Nowhere does it talk about it being wrong to teach a language. Appropriation in novels and music.
73
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Last post by advancedsmite on April 15, 2022, 11:13:12 pm »
Margaret was interviewed multiple times about diversity in education by Urban Milwaukee. Bolding and underlining added for emphasis by me.

Quote
It’s important that native students are taught by American Indian teachers, Noodin said, because diversity in the classroom will lead to better results overall.

“If you go to a school and you see a diverse group of teachers, you see a diverse groups of leaders in that school encouraging you to do your best, and in that group you can see yourself, you have a better chance for success,” she said.
https://urbanmilwaukee.com/2018/11/15/grant-helps-attract-native-american-teachers/

Quote
Margaret Noodin is the director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education at UW-Milwaukee, which is dedicated to strengthening American Indian education at all levels. She points out that it’s also not a simple matter of numbers — the diversity of tribal populations in the state means representation goes deeper than the racial categories in the state Department of Public Instruction’s data.“We should be actually taking enough of a nuanced look to say, where are there schools where there is a high population of Native students, and are there teachers in those schools that match that population?” she said. “Frankly, if you go and get a Cherokee teacher and say ‘Yay, we solved the teaching problem, we’ve got a Cherokee teacher teaching all of these Menominee students,’ that doesn’t actually solve the problem — it’s not someone who speaks Menominee, who experienced termination, who has the knowledge of what it’s like to be Menominee.”
Quote
Noodin pointed to the history of Native American boarding schools, which forcibly removed children from their parents and stripped them of their traditional language and culture to force them to assimilate into white society. That legacy, she said, means Native populations have unique concerns about education that may need to be addressed if schools want to cultivate a pipeline of Native teachers. “In the U.S., the federal government attempted to do harm to Native communities through education,” she said. “That’s partly why it’s been harder to get Native folks to say, ‘Yeah, I want to go to college, I want to be a teacher, I want to be a professor,’ because it’s been the way their communities have been harmed in the past.”
https://urbanmilwaukee.com/2020/06/30/k-12-teachers-dont-reflect-students-diversity/
74
Non-Frauds / Re: Unsettling Geneologies: Unmasking Pseudo-Indians
« Last post by Defend the Sacred on April 15, 2022, 10:28:46 pm »
This is the page for the entire series of lectures, with more details and descriptions of the topics covered:

https://henryg.msu.domains/projects/unsettling-genealogies-conference/

Eight sessions, which concluded today. There were a number of excellent presentations. The panelists were largely from the US and Canada, though today was an international panel which covered Mexican, Australian, and Sámi Indigenous issues. All were recorded, and plans are to post most of the other videos at this url. In addition to the recorded panels, publications and further work will be coming out of this important conference.
75
Etcetera / The Dark World of New Age Gurus (Documentary)
« Last post by fairbanks on April 15, 2022, 07:19:51 pm »
Great documentary about the fraudulent history of the New Thought/New Age movement.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyktccr5apU[/youtube]
76
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Last post by Smart Mule on April 15, 2022, 04:58:03 pm »
Non-Native people have commodified and even copy-righted Indigenous languages. They have stolen bodies of work that have belonged to tribes. I know of several instances of this personally and I am sure there are many more. If a person lacks ethics and monetizes the work they are doing for personal gain or notoriety when they are not part of that community, it's a serious issue. And ultimately, as shkodenhskwe and WIN have said, this is an Ojibwe issue and it HAS caused harm. This needs to be taken into account.
77
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Last post by fairbanks on April 15, 2022, 04:10:02 pm »
Here's an interesting article about cultural appropriation within context of non-natives profiting off of learning native languages.

https://medium.com/literature-and-social-change/give-me-back-my-language-d8244c817067
78
Research Needed / Re: Margaret Noodin, Professor
« Last post by shkodenhskwe on April 15, 2022, 03:34:51 pm »
There's zero evidence of harming anyone. Just the opposite, her being forced to step down harms Ojibwes by taking away a language teacher.

You're certainly right that it's far better to have someone who grew up speaking the language teaching it instead of someone who learned it as an adult. But that's just not possible for more than a few NDN tribes in the US or Canada.

Hi, I only just created an account. But, I came here to politely request that you do not speak on behalf of Ojibwes if you are not one. I am one. And that is also the harm done here. Noori has spoken on behalf of our people and our language and has mined community elders to build her resume and she is not Native. Not one ounce. There are other voices that speak on behalf of themselves, and that is our way.

Thank you to everyone in this forum who has contributed.

I learn my language from my elders and my family. We absolutely do not need a non-Native person teaching our language.
79
Research Needed / Re: Dr. Ruby Gibson
« Last post by fairbanks on April 15, 2022, 02:32:47 pm »
Cultural Survival has an article on Dr. Gibson in which she's listed as Lakota, Ojibway, Mestiza.  "cofounder and executive director of Freedom Lodge, a nonprofit organization in Rapid City, South Dakota that provides historical and intergenerational trauma healing to Native American communities, shares her work on Somatic Archaeology© and its healing potential."

"Somatic Archaeology© is a recovery modality focused on the potential to excavate history in our body through body sensation,  Photo by Jinji Thompson., and balancing the four worlds. We are a walking library and our body, much like the Earth, is full of information. In Somatic Archaeology© we say we’re digging within, excavating the source of our ailments."

https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/voice-choice-and-power-healing-intergenerational-trauma-dr
80
Frauds / Re: Dr. Joe Dispenza
« Last post by fairbanks on April 15, 2022, 01:45:50 pm »
Here's a recent podcast from Conspirituality (great journalists investigating nuage influencers) about "Dr" Joe Dispenza.

https://www.audible.com/pd/98-Placebo-Joe-Dispenza-Podcast/B09XGVJX37

Quote
If you get treated by someone who says they’re a doctor, but they’re not, can they still have a placebo effect? That’s the question we’d like to ask Dr. Joe Dispenza, who’s not a doctor, but who plays one on the internet, treating one and all with the placebo of his bafflegab about Quantum healing and TimeSpace.

Placebo Joe. Who is he? How do you take the measure of a Quantum Man? We’ll shine our browsers into the slit experiment and observe a particle here, a wave there. The particles of video clips, the waves of affiliate links. We’ll run our signature experiment: Schrodinger’s Influencer, to find out just how many parallel Joe Dispenzas are populating the multiple universes he is trying to crack back to alignment with his chiropractic panache. There’s the Joe of the Ramtha School of Enlightenment, Joe who starred in “What The Bleep Do We Know?” There’s faith healer Joe, and Joe who now headlines, alongside David Icke, for the Netflix of conspirituality, Gaia TV.
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