Author Topic: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?  (Read 31653 times)

Offline ska

  • Posts: 139
Re: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2010, 08:22:02 pm »
Just a note about this comment from Camilla:

Good morning everybody (at least, here it 10,40 a.m. :))

1) language: the "women language" spoken by men in the movie is actually due to the fact that - as ny1 mentioned - they learned it from Doris Little Charge


My husband, who is Sicangu Lakota and a fluent speaker, disagrees with this statement and says the late Dr. Blair Rudes must not be a Lakota speaker.  Also, there is no such person as Doris Little Charge - you have misquoted the name.

Offline ny1

  • Posts: 17
Re: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?
« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2010, 08:47:50 pm »
I should say that in the original story where I found the point about the Feminine Dialect Dr. Rudes did not state in any way that it was incorrect for Men to speak the feminine dialect.

according to the Article From the UB today Alumni Magazine (University of Buffalo)

" it is well known that the native dialogue took a glaring wrong turn in that film".  but Dr. Rudes didn't  work on the film himself.

 

Offline Camilla

  • Posts: 51
Re: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?
« Reply #32 on: January 28, 2011, 11:22:13 am »
Just a note about this comment from Camilla:

Good morning everybody (at least, here it 10,40 a.m. :))

1) language: the "women language" spoken by men in the movie is actually due to the fact that - as ny1 mentioned - they learned it from Doris Little Charge


My husband, who is Sicangu Lakota and a fluent speaker, disagrees with this statement and says the late Dr. Blair Rudes must not be a Lakota speaker.  Also, there is no such person as Doris Little Charge - you have misquoted the name.

Nice day to everybody.

Hi Ska. At first sorry for the late answer: for a while I didn't have any chance to visit the forum.
As for Mrs. Leader Charge name you are right: I made a mistake. I was actually meaning Doris Leader Charge (I wrote "Little" instead of "Leader"). But I'm pretty sure that - in spite of my mistake - you and your husband perfectly understood whom I was meaning, since Mrs. Leader Charge was one of the most wonderful characters in the movie (Pretty Shield) and a very well known and respected teacher at Sinte Gleska.
About the language spoken in the movie, I just shared what some Lakotas told me. That's it. I leave it to Lakota language speakers.
By the way, also my former husband is a Sicangu Lakota, family lives in St. Francis, other relatives in Mission. Some relatives are from Standing Rock and they live up North.
May be one day we can have coffee together there! Take care!
 :)
« Last Edit: January 29, 2011, 08:50:30 am by Camilla »
Camilla

Offline tuschkahouma

  • Posts: 57
Re: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?
« Reply #33 on: January 30, 2011, 09:21:39 pm »
I'm saying what Russell Means already said when it was reality that the Lakota warriors owned the Pawnees as the Pawnees were having
their lands overrun by settlers and removed eastern tribes and were forced to join the US Cavalry as scouts against the Lakota warriors.
The Lakota people would've never needed assistance from Wasichus to know how to fight as it was shown in the movie. Look at the
Fetterman Massacre and Little Bighorn. Lakota warriors needed assistance from no one except at Little Bighorn where they had the
assistance of the Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors there.

Offline likeman

  • Posts: 10
Re: How accurate is Dances with Wolves in its depiction of Native Americans?
« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2011, 08:33:04 pm »
lol they made kevin costner talk in a ladies delect