Author Topic: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor  (Read 8481 times)

Offline WINative

  • Posts: 147
Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #75 on: November 21, 2021, 05:23:53 pm »
Noodin is also quoted with below, so does she have a reservation that claims her?


“Noodin said people who say they are Native should be able to say which community they return to frequently, or stay in touch with, and who in a particular community knows them.

“You really just have to honor where people are at and listen to their full narrative, and ultimately the best way to know if someone has an Indigenous connection is to find out where that narrative leads,” she said. “Does it connect to a community who claims them? That's the most important thing.”

Offline advancedsmite

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #76 on: November 21, 2021, 08:28:08 pm »
Here is the article:

Wisconsin is full of cities with Indigenous names. So why do we know so little about them?
Eddie Morales and Samantha Hendrickson
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Published 2:08 p.m. CT Nov. 16, 2021 Updated 2:24 p.m. CT Nov. 16, 2021


Muskego — meaning sunfish. Mukwonago — meaning the place of the bears. Wauwatosa —meaning firefly. These Potawatomi names are just a few of the towns and cities around Southeastern Wisconsin with roots in Indigenous language. But as a state steeped in Native American history, why do we know so little about it? Wisconsin Act 31 is legislation established in 1989 that requires "instruction in the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of the eleven federally-recognized American Indian nations and tribal communities in Wisconsin public school districts."

But some students from the southeastern Wisconsin area said they can't remember learning anything substantial about Indigenous history. With teachers receiving a limited education on Native history themselves, and requests for more instructional materials on the subject, traditional teaching methods aren't working. Some Native people, like 73-year-old Richard Gonzalez, grew up with little knowledge of their ancestral roots. As the history of Native American boarding schools gains more attention, professionals are examining how historical trauma is responsible for a lack of cultural identity in Native families. That’s why Gonzalez, a retired Grafton School District principal, is advising school district show to teach Native American history — while discovering his own identity in the process.

Gonzalez was recently hired as a consultant by the Green Bay Area Public School District where he taught a 16-week course on historical trauma to faculty members. He also served as a panelist in Wittenburg, where, in 1895, a Lutheran mission school became a government-approved off-reservation boarding school.

Rediscovery
When Gonzalez was a child, he asked his mother, Mary Ann Elm, “What does it mean to be Oneida?” “Some of this is hard to talk about,” Gonzalez said. “She would sort of give me the cold shoulder.” “I’m a very young child at the time, and I don’t really know what to ask,” he said. “But I’m hoping she would help me out with this because within our home there was no expression at all of our Indian culture.”

In the mid-1980s, when Gonzalez was the principal at John Long Middle School, he was sent a free sample from a publishing company for the Young People’s Picture Encyclopedia of America. The book is now out of print. On Page 13 of the booklet, a picture depicts an Iroquois man holding a war club behind his head in a threatening pose while he extends his other arm forward with a closed fist. The man bares his teeth in a menacing expression. “Savage warriors by nature, they became the terror of the northeast after the Dutch supplied them with firearms,” the encyclopedia reads. Upon reading the passage, Gonzalez said he put the book down, paused and contemplated. That’s when he decided to learn more about what it means to be Oneida. “If you apply that to us from a cultural, even biological, point of view, it really is saying that we are savage,” he said. “Not only that, we are genetically encoded to be savage.”
Gonzalez said the book started his journey to discover who he is as a Native American person, and motivated him to “improve and include into our curriculum the knowledge of the Native American people.”

Act 31
Margaret Noodin, a professor and director of the Electa Quinney Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, helps Native students earn teaching certifications, which includes taking an Act 31 class. “Act 31 intends to have people be prepared to know Native history of the state,” Noodin said. “We have sovereign nations who are here now, and they have been here, many of them, for quite a long time,” said Noodin. “But not all of them uniformly.” Noodin said it’s important to understand the difference between the Menominee, which hasone nation and a creation story that places them in Wisconsin, and the Ojibwe, which has six nations in the state out of 142 throughout the Great Lakes. “Understanding these Native nations and their different histories is part of what Act 31would try to accomplish,” she said.

In 2014, a survey conducted by the Act 31 survey committee revealed that about 70% of administrators said school districts need more instructional materials on American Indian culture. According to the survey:
- The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and the Ho-Chunk Nation were the tribes and bands most included in instruction.
- Wisconsin American Indian history and culture were covered by large percentages of teachers. About 20% of respondents said they include contemporary tribal issues andtribal sovereignty in their instruction.
- About 40% of teachers integrate Wisconsin American Indian tribe and band curriculum material throughout their curriculum, about 33% teach it as a single unit and about 25%do both.
- The average classroom contact hours spent per school year teaching about Wisconsin American Indian tribes and bands is 11 hours.
- Equal percentages of teachers said they had received college-level instruction in the history, culture and tribal sovereignty of Wisconsin American Indian tribes and bands as those who had not; one-quarter of teachers were not sure or did not recall. Of the teachers who had received training, slightly more than one-half said they received their training in one class only.

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction declined to comment on how Act 31 guidelines are being implemented. Alyssa Mussa, an Act 31 teacher with Milwaukee Public Schools, said she was unable to comment per MPS district guidelines. Cedarburg and Muskego-Norway school districts, two suburban K-12 districts, did not respond to phone messages left for them to discuss Act 31. Afrah, a recent high school graduate from Milwaukee who preferred not to provide her last name, said she remembered learning a little about Indigenous history in her AP U.S. history class at a private school, but not through the rest of her education. "I would definitely like schools to teach more about it than they have, have more empathy shown, and for our history classes to not be so washed out and for students to learn the true American history, because that doesn’t seem to happen a lot," Afrah said.

Noodin said Act 31 helps incorporate Native American history in the curriculum by providing an objective platform for educators to discuss content priorities. She said it’s possible that students could have learned and forgotten material from elementary school, but in comparison to other history lessons “Native history tends to be very, very brief” when taught in schools. “I guess my measure for how well it's working is every year, when I teach a new lecture of 100 students, I say, ‘so what do you feel like you know, and what are you missing?’” said Noodin.“I still have students every year that say, 'well, we just never learned any of this, we never heard about boarding schools, we didn't hear about treaties, we didn't learn any of this.”

‘None of these other places are called home’
In researching his family, Gonzalez learned what his ancestors had accomplished. He learned that his great-grandfather of 10 generations, Chief Skenandoa, advised George Washington in creating the U.S. Constitution. Gonzalez also learned about the effect boarding schools had on his grandparents, mother and more. Native American boarding schools were a federally funded government policy, which began in the 1860s and lasted into the early 1900s. Churches hosted the boarding schools where Native children, far from their reservations, were forced to enroll in an effort to erase their identity and assimilate them into white culture. “I have found about seven or eight different Indian boarding schools that my relatives attended across the nation,” he said. “And none of these other places are called home.”

Gonzalez attributes the early absence of cultural identity in his household to the historical trauma his mother and grandparents endured at such boarding schools. “My mother could not really understand the fullness of her beauty because it was her parents who were also deprived of the natural ability to pass culture on to the child,” he said. Gonzalez’s grandmother, Lucy Skenandore, was taken from her family on Sept. 19, 1895. She was sent to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to attend the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. “Her parents could not visit,” Gonzalez said. “Elders could not visit. She couldn't hear the language as spoken in a traditional community of her people. She couldn't sing her songs.”

According to the Carlisle Indian School Project website, Carlisle was the first government-run boarding school for Native Americans. The school was spearheaded by Civil War veteran Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt “to create an off-reservation boarding school with the goal of forced assimilation.” “Students were forced to cut their hair, change their names, stop speaking their Native languages, convert to Christianity, and endure harsh discipline including corporal punishment and solitary confinement,” according to the website. “This approach was ultimately used by hundreds of other Native American boarding schools, some operated bythe government and many more operated by churches.” “Pratt, like many others at that time, believed that the only hope for Native American survival was to shed all native culture and customs and assimilate fully into white American culture,” the website reads. “His common refrain was “Kill the Indian, Save the Man.”

Noodin, who also teaches Ojibwe language courses, said people with Indigenous identity range from enrolled citizens of sovereign nations to descendants with clear family narratives. “You will often encounter descendants who, like in my family, have stories that we know are traceable and we can talk about,” she said. “For me, part of the inspiration in learning and teaching the language was to honor at least some of my ancestors.” Noodin said she meets many students who’ve grown up away from their nations, and because they feel disconnected, they often want to learn more about their own history. “I think today, unless you're teaching on one of the reservations, you often have to be very careful because people's identity has been erased with their language and their ability to practice their culture,” she said.

Noodin said people who say they are Native should be able to say which community they return to frequently, or stay in touch with, and who in a particular community knows them. “You really just have to honor where people are at and listen to their full narrative, and ultimately the best way to know if someone has an Indigenous connection is to find out where that narrative leads,” she said. “Does it connect to a community who claims them? That's the most important thing.”

‘Reconciliation and healing’
For Gonzalez, educating others about Native American history isn’t meant to assign blame, but rather to inform people about the culture and history of the U.S. “We are looking at reconciliation and healing,” said Gonzalez. Along with asking for a change in how history is taught, students and community members have put pressure on schools to change their Indigenous mascots. Some community members favor maintaining the generation-spanning imagery of their local mascots, while others view the logos as offensive depictions of Native culture. In 2019, the Journal Sentinel reported on a resolution calling on the Wisconsin Association of School Boards to recommend legislation effectively barring schools from using Native American mascots and imagery. Milwaukee-area schools like Menomonee Falls and Muskego are among those in communities that have Indigenous origins, and have used controversial logos for their sports teams. Some proponents of Native American-inspired logos and mascots say it honors those cultures. But Native people say there are other ways to honor their heritage without using imagery they consider offensive — for example, by using abundant local wildlife or other imagery specific to an area.

Jeff Crawford, Potawatomi attorney general, said that Waukesha — meaning fox — was scattered with fox dens that settlers saw when they traveled the area.
"If you look at the old logo for Waukesha County, you would see an Indian dipping his hand down into the water," Crawford said. "That's because of the springs that were there. That was a good place to get fresh water, and that was really a part of Waukesha history." Crawford said the Potawatomi were part of a confederacy of tribes called the Council of Three Fires with the Ojibwe and Ottawa, which inspired the imagery they use today. "The Potawatomi were designated the keepers of the fire," he said. "That's why you see the fire logo on our casino."

Going forward
Today, the basement of Gonzalez's Grafton home includes what was absent during his childhood. Rooms are decorated with displays of traditional artifacts and Native-inspired artwork. Shelves foster framed portraits of Native American chiefs and handmade deer antler baskets created by Gonzalez and his son. Gonzalez teaches classes at the North Shore School for Seniors in Whitefish Bay, including a course on boarding schools. He said some of the adults in his classes have been amazed —and shocked — at the history lessons he teaches. “They feel somewhat betrayed that they have not known American history along these lines, ”he said. “While I lament what happened to my family members, I am choosing to go forward very positively,” Gonzalez said. “The past is in me, but I don’t live in the past.”

Eddie Morales can be reached at 414-223-5366 or eddie.morales@jrn.com. Follow him on Twitter at @emoralesnews.

Offline Cetan

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #77 on: November 24, 2021, 03:25:50 am »
I found out from a talk by Angeline Boulley that Meg was the language consultant for the the audio book of Firekeeper's Daughter


Offline advancedsmite

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #79 on: December 17, 2021, 06:12:25 pm »
Margaret Noodin has an updated bio on the Electa Quinney Institute (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee) site.

https://uwm.edu/eqi/people/noodin-margaret/

Quote
Margaret Noodin received a PhD in Literature and Linguistics, an MFA in Creative Writing and bachelor’s degrees in English and Education at the University of Minnesota. She is currently a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where she also serves as the Associate Dean of the Humanities. She is the author of Bawaajimo: A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature (2014), and two bi-lingual books of poetry in Anishinaabemowin and English: Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English (2015), and What the Chickadee Knows (2020). Her poems have appeared in Poetry Magazine, The Michigan Quarterly Review and Yellow Medicine Review. To see and hear current projects visit ojibwe.net where she and other students and speakers of Ojibwe have created a space for language to be shared. Margaret was born in Greeley, Colorado and grew up in Chaska, Minnesota and has been blessed with many mentors and teachers as she has worked in language and education. She has spent a lifetime learning and teaching the languages of her ancestors. She is not enrolled in any nation but has connections to Grand Portage and Mille Lacs Ojibwe nations and the cities of St. Cloud, Montreal and Donegal. Her ancestors’ names include: O’Donnell, Orr, Hill, Bernard, Bean, Lavallee and Monplasir. As an indigenous language poet Margaret is currently Vice-President of InNaPo where she works to support poets who are citizens of native nations.

Offline WINative

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #80 on: December 17, 2021, 06:34:11 pm »
 Margaret was born in Greeley, Colorado and grew up in Chaska, Minnesota and has been blessed with many mentors and teachers as she has worked in language and education. She has spent a lifetime learning and teaching the languages of her ancestors. She is not enrolled in any nation but has connections to Grand Portage and Mille Lacs Ojibwe nations and the cities of St. Cloud, Montreal and Donegal. Her ancestors’ names include: O’Donnell, Orr, Hill, Bernard, Bean, Lavallee and Monplasir.

So she claims all her European ancestors now, but also still claims she has Ojibwe ancestors from Grand Portage and Mille Lacs...

Offline advancedsmite

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #81 on: December 20, 2021, 06:49:30 am »
I can't find any evidence that Margaret is descended from the Minnesota Chippewa (Grand Portage and/or Mille Lacs). While Margaret does have Canadian French ancestors through her paternal grandmother, Canadian French doesn't equal Metis. I have traced the relevant lines back to 1800ish and everyone is white so far. I haven't come across the Lavallee and Monplasir surnames that she listed in her bio yet. I did happen to find both of those surnames on this list though: https://www.francogene.com/gfna/gfna/998/metis.htm. As no one has been able to find evidence of Minnesota Chippewa ancestry, does Margaret having 1-2 Metis ancestors from the 1600/1700s reasonably explain how she identifies herself? I've started (slowly) compiling quotes and excerpts regarding Margaret's self-identification from the articles shared in posts on this thread, see examples below.

“Meg grew up in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota. She has ancestors who were part Minnesota Chippewa and part Metis – descendants of French explorers and native Indians. Like many of her students, she learned Ojibwe as a second language. She didn’t start taking lessons until she was 15.” (Montemurri, 2008)

 “I am of mixed American ancestry including – Irish, Scots, German, Anishinaabe (MN Chippewa) and Metis.” (Noori, Zingerman's Roadhouse Interview, 2009)

“Originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, I was in my forties at the time and am a second-language speaker affiliated with the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa Indians and Metis community of Quebec.” (Noori, 2009)

“My background is originally in the Minnesota area. I have Metis relatives that came from the Montreal area, the low valleys and hills, and then the tribe that we were enrolled in is the Minnesota Chippewa from Grand Portage area.” (Noori, Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Margaret Noori Discusses Native Americans of Michigan - The Three Fires Confederacy, 2010)

“…Margaret Noodin, descendant of the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Indians, who was raised in Minnesota, and is a teacher of Anishinaabemowin at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.” (Grossmann, 2018)

Sources:
Grossmann, M. A. (2018, July 15). A big week for books: ‘New Poets of Native Nations’ among 5 works introduced. St. Paul Pioneer Press. Retrieved from https://www.twincities.com/2018/07/15/a-big-week-for-books-new-poets-of-native-nations-among-5-works-introduced/
Montemurri, P. (2008, November 16). A New Look at an Old Language. Detroit Free Press.
Noori, M. (2009). The Way They Write Circular Images. In Papers of the Forty-First Algonquian Conference (pp. 195-207). Albany, New York: State University of New York Press.
Noori, M. (2009, September 16). Zingerman's Roadhouse Interview. Retrieved from https://www.zingermansroadhouse.com/2009/09/interview-with-u-of-m-professor-margaret-noori/
Noori, M. (2010, January 6). Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Margaret Noori Discusses Native Americans of Michigan - The Three Fires Confederacy. (I. Lax, Interviewer) Ann Arbor, Michigan: Ann Arbor Public Library. Retrieved from https://aadl.org/node/370469


Offline Diana

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #82 on: December 20, 2021, 03:33:45 pm »
Here's a website by Darryl Laroux. There are no Eastern Métis. It's just another ploy by white supremacist to usurp and destroy First Nations sovereign rights to land, hunting/fishing,  self determination and self government just name a few.
Just because some white people may have found a Native ancestor from the 1600/1700's doesn't make the Metis.
Margaret Noodin O'Donnell is just as bad or worse as these white supremacist


https://www.raceshifting.com/

RACESHIFTING

WELCOME

This website is a resource for people who are concerned with or want to find out more about the rise of the so-called “Eastern Metis” in the eastern provinces (Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia) and in New England (Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine). The actual Métis are a western-based Indigenous people whose culture grew out of kinship relations with the Plains Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, and Dene. The so-called “Eastern Metis” are instead an example of what is referred to as race-shifting or self-indigenization, a process that, in the case of this research project, involves white French-descendants inventing and claiming an “Indigenous” identity, often in opposition to actual Indigenous peoples.

The website includes a “storymap” that features a GIS map of all of the organizations surveyed through our project (about 75). All of the organizations are involved or have been involved in the race shifting movement, mostly since 2000. The map also includes information for several “Eastern Métis” court cases (almost 60) filed in Québec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia that we have identified.

The website also includes all of the publicly-available court documents (expert reports, testimony, interviews, membership records) that have been submitted in several of the key “Eastern Métis” court cases in Québec.

Darryl Leroux’s book, Distorted Descent: White Claims to Indigenous Identity, which includes an analysis of much of this material, was published in September 2019.

Offline Sparks

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Re: Margaret Noodin Ojibwe Professor
« Reply #83 on: December 21, 2021, 05:10:20 pm »
https://www.raceshifting.com/ RACESHIFTING

There is a separate NAFPS topic about this website:

http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=5375.0 [Raceshifting: Tracking Fraudulent "Metis" Groups]