Author Topic: Krystalline Kraus attacks Dave Courchene  (Read 24557 times)

Offline Four Winds

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Krystalline Kraus attacks Dave Courchene
« on: July 17, 2011, 12:34:13 am »
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« Last Edit: July 17, 2011, 02:23:27 am by Four Winds »

Offline Four Winds

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Krystalline Kraus attacks Dave Courchene
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2011, 02:34:45 am »
Hey, I deleted this post. I made a mistake regarding identifying someone from a specific club I'm not a member of that club so I didn't know I shoudln't have done that since it breaks their rules. I apologize if I offended anyone. I was simply posting a friend's query but I should have doubled checked myself before posting. Again, I apologize.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 01:23:05 am by Four Winds »

Offline nemesis

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Re: nature's retreat outside of Toronto, Ontario
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2011, 08:42:53 am »
I think that this is your man

Rocky Montesano
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1389785359

Turtle Lodge FB page here
http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Turtle-Lodge/120821970855

website
http://theturtlelodge.org/

suggests that the lodge was founded by David Courchene, (Nii Gaani Aki Innini – Leading Earth Man)
Anishnabe Nation, Eagle Clan (Manitoba, Canada).

more info on him here
http://theturtlelodge.org/daveCourchene.html


the page on "ceremonies" has the following text:
Ceremonies

The Turtle Lodge is a place of ceremony.   Ceremony is an integral part of all Turtle Lodge programs, which may include the sacred fire, pipe ceremony, and sweat lodge ceremony.   Individuals are welcome to spend time in the Turtle Lodge for personal prayer and fasting.  Major seasonal ceremonies continue to be led by the Turtle Lodge on-site and sometimes at other locations throughout the year, to give thanks and ensure the survival of a good and peaceful way of life.

People coming to ceremonies are responsible for making their own travel and accommodation arrangements, bring their own bedding and supplies, e.g. plates, cups, toilet paper, etc. and are asked to clean up after themselves at the ceremonial lodges.  Potluck feasts are held at many of the ceremonies. Those coming may bring their sacred items, tobacco ties, prepared food for the feasts and a donation. The offerings help cover the costs of firewood, lodge maintenance, feasts, etc. Those who are fasting may camp outside or inside the lodge.

Everyone is welcome to the ceremonies. Women are asked to wear long skirts. Women on their moontime are asked to refrain from coming to the ceremonies, except the Mother Earth Lodge, where they are welcome to participate. Those on their moontime are also welcome to attend Igniting the Fire - The Sacred Gathering, and excuse themselves from the Sunrise and other ceremonies. The Elders can provide teachings on this.



Ceremonies 2010 - 2011

Winter Ceremonies
Participants may choose to fast.
Location: Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  December 21, 22, 23 & 24, 2010
Potluck Feasts:  December 21 (evening), 24 (noon)
Windigokon Ceremony 
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  February 4 & 5, 2011
Potluck Feasts:  February 4, 5 (evenings)

Warrior Dance (Men & Women)
& Mother Earth Lodge (Women)
Participants may choose to fast.
Men to camp outside, women may camp outside or inside Turtle Lodge.
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  May 17, 18, 19 & 20, 2011
Potluck Feasts:  May 17, 20 (evenings)

Mother Earth Lodge (Women)
Participants may choose to fast.
Women may camp outside or inside Turtle Lodge.
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  June 15, 16, 17 & 18, 2011 beginning 9 am June 15

Women on their moontime are invited to attend the Mother Earth Lodge.. Women attending the Mother Earth Lodge are asked to bring uncooked food which they will be preparing on the sacred fires for the Traditional Meal.

Vision Quest (Boys/Men)
& Makoose Ka Win (Young Women's Rites of Passage)
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  June 10-14, 2011.
Volunteers welcome. We have made arrangements to accommodate 50 boys, 50 girls and their mentors. See http://theturtlelodge.org/visionquest.html.

Sundance
Dancers will fast for four days.
Camping outside Turtle Lodge only.
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  July 15, 16, 17 & 18, 2011 (Going-in Potluck Feast, Camp Day July 14)
Potluck Feasts:  July 14 (5:30 pm), 18 (noon)

Families & communities are invited to sponsor the Visitors' Feasts (approx 100 people) daily at 2 pm: Please contact turtlelodge@mts.net if you are interested in sponsoring one of the Visitors Feasts.

Igniting the Fire Gathering (www.ignitingfire.org)
Location:  Manitou Api, near petroform site, Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba
Dates:  September 13, 14, 15 & 16, 2011
Potluck Feasts:  September 13 (noon), 16 (noon)

Ghost Dance (Chii By Dance)
Participants may choose to fast.
Location:  Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  October 11, 12, 13 & 14, 2011
Potluck Feasts: October 11, 14

Winter Ceremonies
Participants may choose to fast.
Location: Turtle Lodge, Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba
Dates:  December 21, 22, 23 & 24, 2011
Potluck Feasts:  December 21 (evening), 24 (noon)

DIRECTIONS TO THE TURTLE LODGE & ACCOMMODATION INFORMATION AT http://theturtlelodge.org/visit.html.
Please contact turtlelodge@mts.net if you have any questions.


http://theturtlelodge.org/ceremony.html

Offline Four Winds

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Re: nature's retreat outside of Toronto, Ontario
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2011, 12:41:22 am »
So i  think that rocky m is  probably a student of Dave Courchene. and it sounds like the turtle lodge is the real deal, so i;m assuming the wisdom passed down would be sound.

i guess i just flagged it when people mix first nations spirituality and catholicism/christianity in the same breath.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 01:14:47 am by Four Winds »

Offline Smart Mule

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Re: nature's retreat outside of Toronto, Ontario
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2011, 01:06:23 am »
Do you really think it's appropriate for you to post about an individual you found through a 12 step program and make that particular fact public?  Regardless of whether he is indian or not that is a significant breach of confidentiality.

I know more canadian aborigonals than not who combine tradition with christianity.  Most of them being elders and Elders.

Offline Four Winds

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Re: nature's retreat outside of Toronto, Ontario
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2011, 01:15:10 am »
Referece removed.

Offline Four Winds

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Hei
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2011, 05:12:07 am »
I'm Saami. Please don't call me a Lapp cuz that is demeaning.

I heard thru the wind that Little Grandmother has in the past called herself Saami and might try to do it again to explain the white skinned, pale hair/eyes and her lies about being an indigenous shaman. Ya, that bothers me. She should not think she can just jump over to this continent to avoid the controversies on yours.


Offline Freija

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Re: Hei
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2011, 02:56:37 pm »
Hej - nice to meet you. I´m from Sweden and have the honor of working with Saamis in order to reduce the exploitation of indigenous cultures. Do you live in Scandinavia?

As far as I know, Kiesha has never claimed to be Saami. But she claimed to work with you guys (just like she has worked with most other Native peoples - according to herself). I doubt she is aware of how many different kind of Saami cultures there are.

Also, in case you didn´t know it, the Saamis have been caretakers of a crystal buried deep in the ice on the North Pole (or was it Greenland?) which was handed over to Kiesha for her to rebury out on a field in central Sweden. Not even my Saami friends knew about this.....amazing!  ::)  ;) ;D ;D

Anyway, welcome on board!

Offline educatedindian

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Don't Get Burned by Fake Authors
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2014, 10:20:45 pm »
A pretty good write up by a white Canadian activist. She's obviously read our site, sites of people we've worked with, or sites by people who have. There's even a little information on a few frauds we may have not covered and some new information on ones we have.

-------
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/krystalline-kraus/2014/08/dont-get-burned-fake-first-nations-american-indian-books-an
Don't get burned by fake First Nations, American Indian books and authors
 By Krystalline Kraus | August 12, 2014

I can certainly appreciate and always encourage Canadians (in fact, anyone) to learn more about First Nations culture. This is one major step forward in Indigenous - Settler relations.

The key here is approaching the topic in a good way. By this I mean avoiding the tragic and, if I may say capitalist, publication of books and pseudo-taro-medicine-cards by authors who have no business making money off other people's life experiences or spiritual beliefs.

Here is a special warning about books written by authors who claim to be "shamans" -- which, by the way, is not even an Amerindian word.

Stay away from any author:
"Claiming to be American Indian shamans, talking about tarot cards and Wiccan/pagan things, or talking about crystals and New Age things. I've got nothing against shamanism, paganism, or the New Age, but a cow is not a horse: none of these things are traditionally Native American. Shamanism is a Siberian mystic tradition, Wicca is a religion based in pre-Christian European traditions, Tarot readings are an Indo-European divination method, and the New Age is a syncretic belief system invented, as its name suggests, in the modern era. None of them have anything to do with authentic Indian traditions, and anyone who thinks they do is likely to be wrong about anything else he claims about Native American religions as well. Wiccans and New Agers don't have any more knowledge about actual American Indian beliefs than you do."

Before I go on, let me tell you a little story about a man named Carlos Castenada.

Castenada was once granted the title of "the Godfather of New Age" by Time Magazine. But please don't consider this an endorsement because he was a complete fraud. Let me tell you why.
 
Carlos Castaneda was a Peruvian-American author who had a PhD in anthropology. He decided one day -- don't ask me what he was thinking at the time, but probably how to make himself famous and earn lots of money -- to impersonate an Indigenous Yaqui "shaman" he named Don Juan Matus and write a series of books in a first-person narrative about the topic of shamanism. In total, his 12 books have sold over 28 million copies and have been translated into seventeen different languages.

The big problem is: there was no Yaqui "Shaman" or "Man of Knowledge" as Castaneda quoted and wrote about in this books. There was no "Don Juan Matus." He didn't exist. He never existed. All that first-person narration of "shamanistic" insights, teachings and spiritual guidance were works of fiction, not fact.

By 1973, because the rising controversy surrounding him and his doctoral education at UCLA, he went to ground, where according to his biography he lived in a big house with three women in a cult-like setting as he founded the organization Cleargreen (and yes, it's made of people).

From Cleargreen's statement of purpose: "The name of Cleargreen stems from an idea that sorcerers who lived in Mexico in ancient times had about the configuration of our human energy. They believed that different kinds of energy had different hues, and that human energy has now an off-white coloration, but that at one time it was clear green."

Canstaneda died in 1998. He was cremated. There was no public service. In fact, the public did not even know of his death until two months later in an obituary titled, "A Hushed Death for Mystic Author Carlos Castaneda" by staff writer J. R. Moehringer for the Los Angeles Times.

Canstaneda's fraudulent works, populated by fake shamans and lots of peyote, began to get challenged roughly five years after he published and things started to unravel. While Canstaneda's books are still bought and sold -- there was a copy in the Native Canadian Friendship Centre of Toronto the last time I checked -- it's pretty much understood that it was all an elaborate hoax from an attention-seeking, money-seeking, PhD student from UCLA.

In a 2007 article in Salon Magazine titled, "The dark legacy of Carlos Castaneda," author Robert Marshall writes, "The books' status as serious anthropology went almost unchallenged for five years. Skepticism increased in 1972 after Joyce Carol Oates, in a letter to the New York Times, expressed bewilderment that a reviewer had accepted Castaneda's books as nonfiction. The next year, Time published a cover story revealing that Castaneda had lied extensively about his past. Over the next decade, several researchers, most prominently Richard de Mille, son of the legendary director, worked tirelessly to demonstrate that Castaneda's work was a hoax."

There are many reasons why such acts of frauds are so tragic, as they not only displace books by authentic First Nations/Native American authors, but since they are sold as truth, the public will believe everything that they read.

So what did the world learn from the trickery of Castenada? Be wary of what you read and what you believe.

So if you're curious about checking out some books on First Nations/American Indian spirituality, before you invest any time or money into any books or authors or courses or taro-medicine-cards, please cross-check the author of the book you're interested in with this list below. I want to note that I did not compile this list myself.

[Also note that I will be tackling the issue of information on the Internet in another post since there is lots to talk about. But essentially, the best method would be to personally approach ths subject, not simply read about it.]

So here is the list that I am asking you to cross-reference to before you pick up or pay.
~ Wolf Moondance
~ Morgan Eaglebear , or Morgan Eaglebear Maez
(There is a letter written by the APACHE NATION which definitely REFUTES Morgan's claim to be related to Geronimo, OR to being a member of that NATION! Look for it on American Indian Movement websites, especially the Virginia chapter!)
~ Brooke Medicine Eagle
~ EARTH THUNDER
~ JAMIE SAMS
~ Hyemeyohsts Storm, Wolf Storm
~ Swan Storm
~ Mary Summer Rain
~ White Crystal Feather
~ Ghostwolf, aka Robert Ghostwolf Franzone
~ Lynn V. Andrews
~ Manny Two Feathers
~ Michael Harner
~ David Carson
~ Randy Tate, aka Randy Two Bears Standing Tate, aka Chief Two Bears Standing Tate,
ShaunaSay Tate, aka ShaunaSay Whitefeather Tate, aka leader of Red Nation of the Cherokee.
~ Neeshanha, aka Kat Lonergan
~ Dhyani Ywahoo, born Diane Fisher
~ Rainbow Eagle, real name Roland Willston
~ Roy Steevensz, aka Roy Little Sun
~ Mary Elizabeth Thunder, aka Mary Thunder, real name Mary Grimes
~ Standing Bear , Aka Standing Bear Moore, aka Manataka, real name Randy Lee Moore
~ Don Miguel, aka Don Miguel Ruiz, aka Sixth Sun
~ Carlos Castenada
~ Marlo Morgan
~ Christine Olinger, aka White Raven
~ Soaring Paw N Hooves Cawley, aka Selma Palmer
~ Dreamwalker, aka Thunderwarriors, aka Tony Dreamwalker, aka Tony Press
~ Bernyce Barlow
~ Don Two Eagles Waterhawk, aka Don Waterhawk, real name Donald R. Cakerice
~ Tom Netz, aka Chief Soft Shell Turtle, aka Ahkootya
~ Carmen Sunrising Pope
~ Katherine Cheshire, aka Dep See Mana
~ Buck Ghost Horse
~ Vicki Ghost Horse
~ Paul Ghost Horse
~ Carole Eagleheart
~ Roy Wilson, Medicine Wheel Tribe
~ Wind Wolf Woman, aka Sunbeam, aka Mahinto
~ Lynda Yraceburu
~ Maria Yraceburu, aka Naylin
~ Dorothy Deagle, aka Dorothy Daigle, aka Red Hat
~ Red Elk, real name Gerald Osbourne
~ Londuv, aka Melanie Hofsteters, aka Melanie Kennedy
~ Many Knives, Bo or Boe Glasschild
~ Duncan Sings Alone, aka C W Duncan
~ Ed McGaa, aka Eagle Man
*Lakota Oyate, NOT US, has him on their not recommended list. Contact the NATION! WE DID!*
~ Jeanne Marie Troge

And not to leave you hanging, here is a website that lists some books by authors who are authentic and whom you should check out.

--God is Red: A Native View of Religion: Book by respected Lakota author Vine Deloria, Jr. comparing Christianity and native religions. It's a controversial book, requires critical thinking skills. I recommend it for adult readers.
--Encyclopedia of Native American Religions: This is really the book you want if you're trying to write an essay about Native American beliefs, or just curious about world religions. Lots of accurate information here.
--Native Religions and Cultures of North America: Collection of in-depth anthropological essays on a dozen different Native American religions.
--The Sacred: Ways of Knowledge, Sources of Life: An interesting book on Native American spirituality by three Indian women from different tribal traditions.
--South and Meso-American Native Spirituality: An overview of Indian religions in countries other than the US and Canada.
Native and Christian: A series of essays by Native American authors on their experiences blending Christianity and Indian spirituality.
American Indian Myths and Legends: Well-attributed collection of many diverse traditional stories of Native America.
-Happy Reading

Offline Smart Mule

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Re: Don't Get Burned by Fake Authors
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2014, 11:24:37 pm »
Krystalline herself is problematic.  She has appropriated Sámi culture and has come up with a fantastical background story.  She also has issues with proper protocol, attempting to throw a respected elder under the bus here, when called on it she deleted her comments.


http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=3363.msg29150#msg29150
http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=3366.msg29097#msg29097
« Last Edit: August 14, 2014, 11:30:53 pm by sky »

Offline RedRightHand

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Re: Don't Get Burned by Fake Authors
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2014, 09:31:54 pm »
Krystalline Kraus is a pretendian and an appropriator.

She posted pictures on facebook of herself making herself a man's catlinite pipe.  She is now dying her hair dark brown, wearing it in two braids and using dark foundation makeup. Krystalline has a twin sister who, like Krystalline, has naturally blond hair and pale skin, and does not claim to be Indigenous. In earlier blog posts, now removed, Krystalline called herself and her family "white trash."  Then she changed her mind and claimed she was adopted. Then her story changed a few more times. 

Now she is going to interfaith spiritual events, misrepresenting herself as Indigenous, and doing fake NDN ceremonies for other white people. She "smudged" a church.  At INM actions she has insisted on speaking for Indigenous people to the press.

She is attacking obvious frauds to try to deflect attention from what she is doing.

Offline RedRightHand

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Re: Hei
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2014, 09:35:59 pm »
I'm Saami. Please don't call me a Lapp cuz that is demeaning.

I heard thru the wind that Little Grandmother has in the past called herself Saami and might try to do it again to explain the white skinned, pale hair/eyes and her lies about being an indigenous shaman. Ya, that bothers me. She should not think she can just jump over to this continent to avoid the controversies on yours.

Quoting the post since she likes deleting her incriminating words.

Offline Defend the Sacred

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Re: Hei
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2014, 09:43:58 pm »
What continent? "Four Winds" is posting from Canada.

Offline RedRightHand

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Re: Don't Get Burned by Fake NDNs, Fake Activists, Fake Saami
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2014, 07:09:30 pm »
Looking over the list Ms. Kraus posted, there is no original or substantial work here. She simply copied and pasted - plagiarized - a ten year old list compiled by actual activists.  Most of these frauds are already abundantly well-known, or no longer active, or in some cases, dead. This list is not up to date, nor does it take any risks.

This is a classic example of "look at that huge, obvious, famous fraud over there and don't look at me, the fraud behind the curtain."

Kraus's heritage is German and Russian, not Saami.  She has no day job, but turns up at all the demos with expensive camera equipment, taking photos of Natives and insisting on speaking for Natives to the pres. You do the math. 


Offline RedRightHand

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Re: Hei
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2015, 09:15:57 pm »
I'm Saami. Please don't call me a Lapp cuz that is demeaning.

I heard thru the wind that Little Grandmother has in the past called herself Saami and might try to do it again to explain the white skinned, pale hair/eyes and her lies about being an indigenous shaman. Ya, that bothers me. She should not think she can just jump over to this continent to avoid the controversies on yours.

Don't worry, we won't call you a Lapp. But we won't call you Saami, either. You're a German-Canadian pretendian who's been causing all kinds of problems for the real Saami people. You should be ashamed of yourself, coming here and lying like that.