Author Topic: chief samuel little fox  (Read 1818 times)

Offline milehighsalute

  • Posts: 351
chief samuel little fox
« on: April 27, 2021, 04:38:06 pm »
https://www.nellis.af.mil/News/Article/2536371/living-risking-it-all-newest-space-force-intelligence-officer-aims-for-the-stars/

shaman of all 13 tribes of long island

he is of the EXTINCT Matinecock tribe

looked at his "ceremonial" gear and his daughter's gum machine headband

laughable

Offline milehighsalute

  • Posts: 351
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2021, 04:40:27 pm »

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2021, 06:25:05 pm »
"Chief Samuel Little Fox" = Samuel Steven "Sonny"  Boyd Jr. https://queenslibrary.aviaryplatform.com/collections/21/collection_resources/30166

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2021, 06:37:08 pm »
As Tribal Factions Squabble, Hopes Fade on Land at Fort
LeDUFF, CHARLIE. New York Times, Late Edition (East Coast); New York, N.Y. [New York, N.Y]06 July 1997: 6

''The great nations of the American Indian will rise again after the birth of the white buffalo,'' said Chief Sonny Little Fox, recounting an ancient prophecy of the Lakota Sioux.

Such a calf was born three years ago in Wisconsin, and like tens of thousands of believers, Mr. Little Fox, who lives in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, made the pilgrimage to witness the living miracle. Sadly, the white buffalo later turned brown.

That buffalo is a fitting metaphor for the Matinecock Nation, Mr. Little Fox said: one of tenuous hope. The tribe, of perhaps 250 members, is split into two factions. The rift may end its chance of reclaiming an ancestral burial ground said to lie in Fort Totten.

One faction regards Chief Little Fox as the grand sachem, the other backs his distant cousin, Chief Osceola Townsend. ''You cannot negotiate when the family is divided,'' said Mr. Townsend, 62, of Kew Gardens, Queens.

It is one of the few points on which the two men agree. ''For a long time, people thought we were dead,'' Mr. Little Fox said. ''Now with the fighting, we are killing ourselves.''

For nearly 200 years, anthropologists and historians considered the Matinecock extinct. The tribe, however, was resurrected in 1958 by Princess Sun Tama, born Ann Harding. After being moved by a vision, she placed an article in a Flushing paper calling for all Matinecock descendants to come forward. Several hundred descendants still live on western Long Island, most a mix of African, European and Matinecock backgrounds. Sun Tama's aim was to reclaim native traditions and land. But land has never been won, in part because of backbiting.

Today Mr. Townsend will acknowledge Mr. Little Fox only as a junior sachem. Mr. Townsend said his claim to leadership rests in an affidavit signed by Chief John Little Moose Williams, who led the tribe through the 1980's. In that document, signed shortly before his death in 1987, Chief Little Moose turned his duties over to Mr. Townsend.

''That isn't Indian way,'' Mr. Little Fox said. ''signing some paper. I went through a ceremony, and I was elected by the tribal council to be chief. Anything that Osceola does as chief is wrong and illegal.''

Mr. Townsend dismissed that. ''I don't need any ceremony and I don't recognize the council,'' he said.

Cheryl Brady, chairwoman of the Matinecock Council of Elders and a cousin of Mr. Townsend, backs Mr. Little Fox as chief. She said the council had never seen the affidavit.

As the family squabble smolders, an opportunity for stewardship of the land evaporates. In 1995 the Defense Department announced that the fort in Bayside would be turned over for civilian use. Final recommendations from the Fort Totten Redevelopment Authority, the panel in charge of the project, are due by Dec. 18.

Thomas Sweeney, a spokesman for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, said it was unlikely that the Matinecock could make a successful claim without Federal recognition of the tribe.

Fearful that the sacred ground would be violated by grave robbers, Mr. Townsend has refused to reveal its exact site until the city assures him that the ground gets landmark status. He will not even tell his people. ''There will be a time for that,'' he said. ''When we come together as one.'' CHARLIE LeDUFF

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2021, 06:40:00 pm »
QUEENS Diary / Chief Among Them: After 14 Long Years, The Matinecocks Have a New Leader: [QUEENS Edition]
BY MERLE ENGLISH. STAFF WRITER. Newsday, Combined editions; Long Island, N.Y. [Long Island, N.Y]31 May 1998: G09.

We're not asking for much. Half of Long Island was all Matinecock. Why can't they give us back something?' - Chief

IN THE BASEMENT of Macedonia Church in Flushing on a recent Saturday, Samuel Boyd Stevens sat cross-legged on a rug facing about four dozen people seated in a semicircle.

Many in the gathering wore fringed leather tunics, beaded moccasins and other American Indian dress and jewelry. But Stevens stood out among them.

Wearing, over white dungarees, a silken white shirt with red, yellow and blue ribbons encircling the upper arms, he complemented the outfit with a choker fashioned from turquoise beads and animal teeth and claws, and a broad mother-of-pearl bracelet on one arm.

Rings on every finger except his thumbs were formed into lizard, lion, turtle and other animal designs. A white cape made of long beads and feathers attached to a headdress topped by what appeared to be a snake's head flowed out behind him onto the floor.

In his right arm Stevens cradled a staff topped by a turtle's shell and in his left a large eagle's feather.

Stevens was being ceremonially installed by members of his Matinecock tribe as their new leader, or sachem, Chief Little Fox. As his mission, he has promised to revive the culture of the Matinecocks - a group that once occupied large portions of Long Island and Queens - and win back some of the land that was taken from them.

The chieftainship of the tribe had been in dispute following the death in 1984 of John Williams (Chief Little Moose), who was then the Matinecock sachem. Oceola Townsend, of Kew Gardens, who Little Fox said is his cousin, had spoken for the tribe as its chief until the tribal council voted for Little Fox in October. In a response conveyed by his daughter, Pamela, Townsend said he wouldn't "dignify with any comment" Little Fox' promotion by the tribal council.

He was the only recognized Matinecock chief, Townsend said, and described Little Fox as "a sub-chief."

But Little Fox said Chief Little Moose once told him he had a vision that Little Fox would be chief after him.

"He left me as junior chief with his hand blessing on my head," Little Fox said. The event at Macedonia Church was to formalize his leadership.

The ceremony got under way with an American Indian prayer by Marjorie Paris, a Matinecock. Then Running Bear, shaman of the Ramapos of New Jersey, conducted a blessing ritual.

Dipping a feather into a bowl of water, Running Bear shook the droplets on Little Fox. He again shook the feather while intoning in Algonquian a prayer to the "Great Spirits of the West, East, North and South," and to "Mother Earth and Father Sky."

Taking up pinches of tobacco from a pouch on a rug laid out on the floor near Little Fox, Matinecocks and their guests offered prayers for his guidance and good wishes for his tenure as chief.

"I've come many miles to see this moment," said Chief Robert Cooper of the Montaukett tribe of Riverhead. "We know the Great Spirit is at work, because we are not gone. We are here, and we are here to stay."

That is the message Little Fox wants to send as he takes up his position.

"It's my time to use my power to get back what belongs to you," he told the Matinecocks. "My job is to try to help my people get back some of their land. Everything in this country today belongs to us, but we're not asking for much. Half of Long Island was all Matinecock. Why can't they give us back something?

"It's not about hate, it's about our future, to get something back for our people, because we are still here," Little Fox said, adding, "We got wiped out because they wanted the land. We forgive them for the mistake they made. I'm only going to stand for the future. My aim is to keep my culture alive, to keep our people off the street and away from drugs and breaking laws," he said.

Little Fox spoke with authority despite a lisp left over from nearly a lifetime of learning how to speak after he lost his voice and his hearing in a fall when he was an infant. He regained his voice at the age of 4, he said, when he awoke one night screaming. He'd dreamt that a giant spider had grabbed him by the neck.

The new Matinecock chief, 52, was born in East Harlem. He lives in Lindenhurst and works as a porter with the New York City Housing Authority. He trained as a junior chief under Chief Little Moose, according to Cheryl Brady, chairwoman of the Matinecock tribal council. Little Fox was named the "keeper and carrier of the sacred pipe," indicating that he is able to conduct all of the ceremonies, she said.

Little Fox is the only living member of the tribe to receive the sacred rites of chieftainship, Brady said, and his position as sachem is equivalent to that of a chief executive officer of a corporation. During the ceremony she presented to him certificates verifying his chieftainship.

"His goal is to keep the Matinecock name alive, keep the tribe united and teach the culture," she said. "We are celebrating his achievements of being elected to the highest position at such a young age and his many years of loyal service, dedication and commitment to the tribe."

As an indication of that commitment, Little Fox organizes and attends powwows and ceremonies, performs traditional dancing and makes American Indian jewelry.

"He's been at it ever since he's been a teenager," Brady said.

Members of the tribe, which numbers about 250 in Queens and on Long Island, "are starting to come back," Brady said. They are holding meetings at Macedonia until a traditional Long House, or meeting place, can be established.

Mandingo Oceola Tshaka, a spokesman for the tribe, said, "I hope that he {Little Fox} comes up with some positive ideas to bring us forward. We're hoping that by having a sachem, that will show that we're going forward, and it will be like a magnet for people who are laying back, waiting for something to happen.

"Now that we have a leader that we say is our leader," Tshaka said, "we're hoping that will attract others."

Offline milehighsalute

  • Posts: 351
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2021, 06:45:15 pm »
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

i love hearing about FAKE native tribes having internal issues

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2021, 06:54:44 pm »
Her name, unless she has legally changed it, is Haida Boyd.

Notes from The Hill Top Times (Hill Air Force Base, Utah) 02 Dec 2004, page 3 (via newspapers.com) :

Parents divorced when she was 6 months old, mother rarely spoke of her father.

She grew up in rural South Dakota. Experienced racist bullying at predominately white schools.

Once she connected with her father as an adult, she now believes that she is "the daughter of an Indian chief and an Indian princess".  "descendant of Seminole, Cherokee, and other eastern American Indian tribes" "full blooded American Indian and descendant of seven Eastern tribes"

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2021, 07:16:24 pm »
https://www.facebook.com/MatinecockTribe/

Quote
This is the official page of the Matinecock Indian tribe of Long Island endorsed by Princess Nuppaqua(reigning princess,council chairperson and keeper of the archives).


Quote
Please do not mistake us for a group calling themselves the matinecock nation, they are not us. We donot know who these people are.

Quote
Cheryl Brady
We no longer give out last names. People are taking our last names and calling themselves Matinecocks. These are people we donot know. You can start with a historial figure in that tribe. Historial figures are in history books, historial society pamplets, etc...I will tell you the name Smith is the royal family and you would have to know the history. I can tell you I am a member of the royal family and currently the reigning princess.

The two photos uploaded here (sign in to see)

a. "Throwback pic of my mom. Its about 20 years old." from the admin of this FB page
b. "Circa 1973... Wish I had more pics but someone stole them out of the Longhouse(amongst other things)". "the other man in the white shirt is chief little moose. Also chief little fox is in the black shirt."

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2021, 07:23:49 pm »
The admin (says her name is Golden Sun) of The official page of the Matinecock Indian tribe of Long Island FB identifies this woman as her mother:

Quote
Greetings 
Greetings To All, my name is Princess Nuppaqua , and I would like to introduce myself and tell you a little bit about myself. I am the 7th generation Great Granddaughter of historical figure Grand Sachem Tackapusha who ruled over Greater/Lower New York in the 1600's. It is Tackapusha who is posing on the Dutch Seal Of New York. My Great Grandmother and her parents lived on their native settlement called, " Matinecock Row " formally located in Lakeville/Manhasset, Nassau County. Lakeville is the village they founded. Our native family cemetery still exist there. In the 1960's, the descendants of Tackapusha ( The Royal Family ) established their longhouse in Flushing, New York. It was called, " The Tackapusha  Longhouse." This is where  My cousin, Sachem/Chief Little Fox and I grew up. Under the leadership of the Royal Court and the Chiefs, we began our training to one day help lead the tribe. In my youth, I was an aide for the Royal Court, and later on became an apprentice with varied and extensive tasks and duties. As the current reigning princess (an inherited position) I was voted into the position/title of Chairperson of the Council Of Elders in 1997. I am a Sewan(shell) Crafter(one of two left) and I enjoy doing beadwork and making my own regalia. In my youth I was a Spirit Dancer and a Shawl Dancer. When health and weather permits, I attend the pow wows and I may do a gig or two. Lol...Today, many of the Royal Family live in Queens. I reside in the Town Of North Hempstead/Nassau County. It was nice meeting and talking with all of you. Until next time...

Offline milehighsalute

  • Posts: 351
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2021, 08:28:48 pm »
my question is who are the 13 long island tribes and do they consider li'l fox their "shaman"?

i thought it was only shinnecock out that way

Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2021, 08:55:35 pm »
I found this group back in 1959:

"Chief Little Moose" John Williams
"Princess Sun Tama" Mrs. Ann Harding Murdock
"Chief Bald Eagle" John Harding
"Princess Heather Flower" Mattie Waters
"Princess Brown Thrush" Lyla Harding
"Chief Running Deer" James T Wilson
"Chief Standing Bear" Rev. James C Burns "grand nephew of the Apache chief Geronimo

They founded the "Tackapoosha Chapel ".

This info from The New York Age, 05 Dec 1959, page 8

The Little Fox image is from their current FB page. "Princess Brown Thrush" is in that photo. She died in 1992.

In a 1972 article she said that the tribe was reactivated in 1958 at her home. And that she was a descendant of Tackapoosha, a sachem of her tribe.


Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2021, 09:18:43 pm »
my question is who are the 13 long island tribes and do they consider li'l fox their "shaman"?

i thought it was only shinnecock out that way

In 1951 this group identified as "The Shinnecock Indian Tribe" led by Chief Nowendonoah. "Princess Heather Flower" is mentioned, 10 years old at the time. "Princess Nowendona" also included. They made the president of Fairleigh Dickinson college an "honorary chief". They gave him a headdress, "smoked peace pipe",  and did "dance steps representing the approach of the white man".

(The Record (Hackensack New Jersey) 10 Nov 1951, page 3)

In a 1972 article Princess Heather Flower said she was all Indian with a Cherokee mother and a father (Chief Standing Waters) a combination of Algonquin, Narraganset, and Shinnecock.


Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2021, 09:59:48 pm »
Mention of "Princess Brown Thrush" Lyla Harding again:

1958 two sisters Ann Harding Murdock (Princess Sun Tama) and Lila Elizabeth Harding (Princess Brown Thrush) organized an informal longhouse - "tribal flame re-lit",  Matinecock tribe reorganized.

(The Long Island Indians and their New England Ancestors: Narragansett, Mohegan, Pequot & Wampanoag Tribes, Donna Gentle Spirit Barron, 2006)


Offline verity

  • Posts: 137
Re: chief samuel little fox
« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2021, 11:22:04 pm »
There is so much ongoing infighting among these extended family groups.

In general, all say they are descended from http://www.matinecocktribalnation.org/chief-tackapousha.html#chief-tackapusha-grand-sachem - from the 1600s.

Then they jump to this gentleman from the 1800s http://www.matinecocktribalnation.org/chief-john-mapevanisto-waters.html#chief-john-mapevanisto-waters . John E. Waters looks to be in a census listed as Indian, his wife and all children listed Black. Although much more thorough genealogy work needs to be done.

Next there was a claimed revival in the 1950s. As far as I can tell, the descendants of those who did the "revival" are now arguing.

"Chief Little Fox" Samuel Steven Boyd Jr. is in the mix, somehow.