Author Topic: Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany  (Read 10511 times)

Offline Ingeborg

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Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany
« on: April 16, 2011, 02:56:28 pm »

A Bavarian event and conference centre by the name of Lokschuppen [i.e. engine shed] in the town of Rosenheim is doing an exhibition of various historic ndn objects; the exhibition is said to be the largest in Germany, and will run from April 8 to November 6, 2011.

The exhibition means to overcome stereotypical views of ndn nations and portray the diversity of ndn cultures. I cannot comment their choice of exhibits in general or in particular, as I haven't seen the exhibition, but they worked with Prof. Christian Feest as a curator, so it is to be expected that this part of the exhibition will be okay.

The criticism I see is with the programme of workshops organized by the event centre, in particular the so-called 'museum educational service'. Their programme employs numerous stereotypes and also does not really bother to acknowledge limits as to religions and spirituality. Therefore, the different activities actually counter the educational objectives listed for each programme, as well as those of the exhibition in general.



This is the event centre's introductory text to the exhibition:

http://www.indianer-ausstellung.de/ausstellung.htm

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About the exhibition

Warriors, buffalo hunters, ghost dancers, adventurers – who does not know the Indians? But: who owned the tipis? Where did the Iroqois live? What does an Indian have to do with hunting whales or what does an Apache violin sound like? Are Eskimo Indians, too?

Go seeking traces! Stroll through the wide world of the American natives. Discover the various ways of life of the individual tribes. Get to know the past and present cultures of the Indians. Europe's largest Indian exhibition will take you on a historical journey across the North American continent and gets rid of popular stereotypes.

From the Nootka at the American northwestern coast to the Great Lakes area in the Midwest and to the Sioux, Apache and Comanche in the Southwest, numerous Indian tribes get portrayed true to detail and their story is being told – from first contact with Europeans to the „new“ world of the Indians. Numerous historic orginal exhibits – among them rare Sioux clothes of up to 150 years of age, painted buffalo hides and a completely furnished wooden house from Greenland – report  resistance and subjection, malice and deftness in hunting, sustainability and respect.

The Indian Parcours offers an entertaining and exciting adventure for the entire family at the Lokschuppen premises. You can prove courage, skills, and knowledge – in reading tracks and climbing, during a common 'buffalo hunt' or in shooting with bow and arrows.


One might be inclined to put the 'Sioux in the Southwest' down to an unfortunate glitch – were it not for the fact that this misplacement shows up in several Lokschuppen PR texts. The intro of the text narrows Indian ways of life and existence to 'Warriors, buffalo hunters, ghost dancers, adventurers', and the further sentences also do not quite convince the reader these stereotypes can and will be removed by a visit to the exhibition. Certainly not given an 'Indian parcours' where visitors will be made to track and climb [huh?] and stereotypically hunt buffalo. What a waste of probably excellent exhibits, when the promotion relies on the very same stereotypes the exhibition means to do away with. Nowadays, museums and such have an educational department writing up such texts and devising programmes for visitors, but what will they be able to hand down in the way of factual information as long as they reinforce stereotypes in order to draw visitors to their premises, thus once more raising wrong concepts and expectations with their audience?

Perhaps a look at their educational programmes and tours will shed some light on this:

http://www.indianer-ausstellung.de/fuehrungen_workshops.htm 

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Workshops for schools, kindergarten groups, and informal groups of children

Educational events accompanying the exhibition „Indians. Natives of America“.
For children and school children of various age groups, we offer several events around the world of the North American Indians.

Feather headdress
from pre-school
Iroquois or Sioux? Chief, warrior or dancer?
The children will learn why Indians wear feather headdresses. Coloured or cut-off feathers could only be worn if the Indian had commited certain brave acts. The children will do a feather headdress to Indian music and afterwards, as an Indian child, chief or warrior, will listen to a story.

Educational objectives: assuming a role with fantasy, imagination and experiencing a different culture via music and story and training abilities to work with pre-school materials


Drum
from grade 1
Who wants to make the pace of the rhythm?
In the language of the Sioux, the drummer is the „icabu“. Drum rhythms, songs, and ritual dances have an immense value in the cultural life of the Indians. Every child will build their own drum which will be decorated with Indian patterns and ornaments.
Educational objectives: Crafting abilities, ideas, and a feeling for rhythm will be on demand. Topics are Indian way of life [sic], music, way of transmitting information and communication as well as experiencing community.


Eagle claw amulet
from grade 2
„The eagle is the most sacred bird for all tribes, all peoples....“
As a king of the air, the eagle was revered by many Indians. Decorative amulets with eagle claws and feathers are meant to give strength and courage to the person wearing it. Students will create an amulet in the style of the Crow Indians and will be able to realize creative ideas when applying coloured patterns, feathers, pieces of fur and symbols.

Educational objectives: This workshop promotes creativity and furthers the interest in design concepts of a culture alien to us. The world of philosophy and belief, the special reverence and respect of animals will be brought up as an issue. The workshop will especially appeal to boys – the eagle as a symbol of strength, bravery, freedom, power, and endurance.


Glass bead bracelet
from grade 3
Coloured glass beads were precious merchandise for the Indians – saddlebags, mocassins, and clothes were decorated with these beads. Beadwork and beaded jewelry are among the most beautiful and lavish craft articles of the natives of North America. The students will create their own bead pattern in accordance with Indian models and will apply these to a stripe of leather. Every student will do a genuine piece of jewelry.

Educational objectives: Dexterity, concepts of design, craft – with these bracelets, the children will bring a piece of Indian culture into their life. In this workshop, necessary virtues like patience, endurance, dexterity as well as a part of Indian cultural history may be empathized.


Katsina figure
from grade 4
„Katsinam are everywhere and are watching us...“
In the belief of the Hopi Indians, Katsinam are invisible and good-natured spirit beings, gods, and souls of persons who passed away. In ritual dances, they were asked for assistance. Children received these figures as a present so that they could learn to understand the spirit world. From gypsum models, children chose one of the beings and give their Katsina figure an individual appearance with different paintings and decorations.

Educational objectives: Creativity, concepts of design, getting to know other denominations, religious rituals and concepts. The students will get to know exotic aesthetics and alien concepts of design. The workshop promotes understanding alien cultures. Another issue is living with nature in the annual rhythm and the seasons.


Dreamcatcher
from grade 5
„What an Indian dreams is reality to him...“
From beads, feathers, leather, and natural materials, students will craft their personal dreamcatcher according to the Sioux model. The adorned nets elaborately knotted and wired will take care that only good dreams will find their way into the thoughts of the sleeper. At the same time, dream catchers also symbolize the circle of life and the close connection to nature.

Educational objectives: Creativity, fantasy, craft. Understanding of alien cultures and getting to know different denominations, religious rituals and concepts, as well as critical questioning of tourist articles. Living with nature – in the annual rhythm and the seasons.



Lakota culture
for all age groups
Author and Lakota expert Kerstin Groeper-Schmäling introduces stories, fairy tales, games, music and dances as well as Lakota language.
Only on Fridays from April to July from 10-11 a.m.



Another entertainment is the so-called „Indian Parcours“ open daily from 10 am to 6 pm:

http://www.indianer-ausstellung.de/fuehrungen_parcours.htm


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Indian Parcours

An entertaining and exciting adventure for the entire family is offered with the Indian Parcours. At 15 stations in the exhibition, in the tipi village, and on the Lokschuppen premises, you will be able to prove your courage, skills, and knowledge. During the first part, you are supposed to go through the exhibition attentively and look for the answers. During the second part, you can score by shooting with bow and arrow, hunting buffalo, catching mustangs, or balancing. Scores from each station will be secured on your „Indian card“. Then you will see who is the real chief in your group.

The parcours may be entertaining and exciting – but it gets promoted with some stereotypical garbage (and calling it 'stereotypical' is a euphemism). It reinforces concepts of all ndns having hunted buffalo and caught mustangs, and thus neglects that a very large number of nations relied on agriculture. We perhaps must be grateful the score card got named „Indian card“ and not enrollment card – but then again the persons planning the workshops probably and fortunately weren't aware there are such things as enrollment cards. But that last sentence above tops it all: a plunge into white supremacy – all it needs for white visitors to become a 'real chief' is a short parcours of 15 tasks.
There is more to be expected from an educational services department than to try their utmost and reinforce whatever stereotype there is around, and to h*ll with whatever intent the exhibition may have.


Lokschuppen also organized a workshop for their guides. The workshop was done by Dirk Schröder, a German nuager and seller of ceremonies (research on Schröder pls see here: http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=3275.0  ) who also offers workshops and seminars in which he teaches the methods of Tom Brown (NAFPS has got several threads on Tom Brown already). The guides were supposed to learn genuine ndn sneaking techniques in the workshop.

http://www.rosenheim24.de/bayern/schleichen-indianer-ausstellung-lokschuppen-rosenheim24-1161800.html

Quote
Sneaking like an Indian

Rosenheim – Prior to the start of the adventure exhibition „Indians – native North Americans“, tour guides learn how to sneak properly. We accompanied them on soft soles.

A snap from a branch breaking – and the prey animal is gone. To move through nature silently is a great challenge for modern man. Sneaking expert Dirk Schröder demonstrated the techniques of the American Natives to Lokschuppen guides on Monday. The newly trained sneakers will pass on the knowledge of primitive peoples during guided tours through the exhibition „Indians – natives of North America“. The Indian exhibition will start on April 8.

One of the photos shows the poor guides 'sneaking' through a room at the event centre in what seems like a 'lumbago posture' with one hand above their eyes which looks extremely silly when done indoors – despite a few handfuls of hay thrown on the floor to add some 'feeling of nature'. Apparently event organizers prefer to perpetuate stereotypes instead of getting rid of them, as they have their guides trained to hand down stereotypes to visitors. It is far more unfortunate and distressing that organizers also do not seem to mind to promote sellers of ceremonies and of wilderness garbage.



Lokschuppen will also organize gigs and events with several Indian artists, like Art Napoleon (Cree, singer), Wade Fernandez (Menominee, singer), and Murray Small Legs (Blackfoot). These events will take place on April 30 (Art Napoleon), June 11 (Wade Fernandez), and August 13, 2011 (Murray Small Legs).

The official Lokschuppen site says:

„The Indians in Lokschuppen! On April 30, June 11, and August 13, 2011, Lokschuppen Event Centre will organize an Indian party powwow style. Between 10 a.m. and 6 pm, the audience will be able to experience various impressive dances and dancers and Indian live-music.“
Emphasis mine

There will also be Indian artists doing gigs at the aforementioned dates:
Art Napoleon on April 30, Wade Fernandez on June 11, and Murray Small Legs on August 13.


Perhaps this needs to be specified somewhat as far as Indian dancers are concerned... On April 1, 2011, a user by the name of 'Bruno' posted the following at „Cherokee Friends“, a German language forum for hobbyists and powwow dancers:

„On April 30, June 11, and August 13 […], there will be a small 'powwow' (ahm, well, probably the term is a bit too ambitious!) …. But: those who want to participate are cordially invited. We can arrange accom and everybody showing up at these dates will receive a tour of the exhibition for free.“

Inviting the German hobbyists and powwow dancers leaves the impression that there might be a certain lack of 'real ndns', so they ask that crowd to join.... I do wonder whether Napoleon, Fernandez, or Small Legs are aware they will do a gig with German hobbyists posing as ndns and dancing.


Presumably, Lokschuppen meant to do a balancing act between the exhibition and its aims, while at the same time appealing to visitors with various stereotypical concepts about ndns. This already marks their choice of a picture for the exhibition's official poster, showing an ndn person on horseback, wearing a war bonnet. The actual exhibition is presented in twelve rooms, only one of which displays Plains cultures. The programme of workshops offered is not only aimed at families, but especially at schools and kindergartens, to whom they will pass much stereotypical and even outright racist concepts and ideas. As the saying goes, well-meant usually in fact is the contrary of well done.






Offline Ingeborg

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Re: Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2011, 02:59:55 pm »

Some more remarks regarding the workshops and the 'educational objectives' mentioned by Lokschuppen:

Quote
Feather headdress
from pre-school
Iroquois or Sioux? Chief, warrior or dancer?
The children will learn why Indians wear feather headdresses. Coloured or cut-off feathers could only be worn if the Indian had commited certain brave acts. The children will do a feather headdress to Indian music and afterwards, as an Indian child, chief or warrior, will listen to a story.

Educational objectives: assuming a role with fantasy, imagination and experiencing a different culture via music and story and training abilities to work with pre-school materials


It is no legit educational objective to have children 'assume roles with fantasy and imagination'. Assuming a role, impersonating will not result in an understanding of other cultures, and the use of 'fantasy and imagination' is in definite collision with factual information.
Having the children make a headband and joining a (plastic?) feather to it will of course reinforce the stereotype that all Indians 'wear feathers' – and organizers seem to believe that's an ndn characteristic past and present, cf above: „The children will learn why Indians wear feather headdresses“.


Quote
Drum
from grade 1
Who wants to make the pace of the rhythm?
In the language of the Sioux, the drummer is the „icabu“. Drum rhythms, songs, and ritual dances have an immense value in the cultural life of the Indians. Every child will build their own drum which will be decorated with Indian patterns and ornaments.

Educational objectives: Crafting abilities, ideas, and a feeling for rhythm will be on demand. Topics are Indian way of life [sic], music, way of transmitting information and communication as well as experiencing community.


An educational objective speaking of one Indian way of life – what a waste of time, effort, paper, and webspace. As these educational objectives will primarily be read by kindergarten personnel and teachers, the programme will also perpetuate the stereotypical concept of the existence of one generic ndn culture with this group of readers who will infect more generations with this stereotype.



Quote
Eagle claw amulet
from grade 2
„The eagle is the most sacred bird for all tribes, all peoples....“
As a king of the air, the eagle was revered by many Indians. Decorative amuletts with eagle claws and feathers are meant to give strength and courage to the person wearing it. Students will create an amulet in the style of the Crow Indians and will be able to realize creative ideas when applying coloured patterns, feathers, pieces of fur and symbols.

Educational objectives: This workshop promotes creativity and furthers the interest in design concepts of a culture alien to us. The world of philosophy and belief, the special reverence and respect of animals will be brought up as an issue. The workshop will especially appeal to boys – the eagle as a symbol of strength, bravery, freedom, power, and endurance.

First of all, the eagle is not viewed as sacred by all ndn peoples. Amulets are not objects which give strength and courage, so the objective of introducing children to ndn philosophy and beliefs (rather than the singular 'belief' used in the Lokschuppen text) cannot not be achieved. Let's hope they will manage to get across what they characterize as 'respect of animals' in an appropriate way.

What is not mentioned in the description of the workshop or in the educational objectives: of course they will not be able to provide real eagle claws, but imitations. So what is there to be learned? That it is okay to imitate, and to use plastic imitations – and still 'we' may call it the real deal. This has a lot to do with supremacy, but nothing at all with teaching respect or giving even a faint idea of it. This becomes evident once more when the description mentions the amulet is done in Crow style, while students will realize their own creative ideas. One should think that both is mutually exclusive.
And will the workshop explain to students how such an amulet was done in traditional Crow society? How relatives made them, with what intent, and how such gifts were presented to young persons, and on which occasions? The description does not mention this, so we may doubt it. So instead of giving some insight into different ways of thinking and concepts, from which some understanding might result, students will just imitate an object and receive stereotypical concepts.

Another educational objective not mentioned apparently is: reinforcing stereotype Euro role models – since they assume this workshop 'will especially appeal to boys', as apparently it is only boys who need 'strength, bravery, freedom, power, and endurance' [sarcasm off]. Whoever drafted the above paragraph might want to return to university and redo pedagogics 101. Or probably a prep course  for pedagogics 101.



Quote
Glass bead bracelet
from grade 3
Coloured glass beads were precious merchandise for the Indians – saddlebags, mocassins, and clothes were decorated with these beads. Beadwork and beaded jewelry are among the most beautiful and lavish craft articles of the natives of North America. The students will create their own bead pattern in accordance with Indian models and will apply these to a stripe of leather. Every student will do a genuine piece of jewelry.

Educational objectives: Dexterity, concepts of design, craft – with these bracelets, the children will bring a piece of Indian culture into their life. In this workshop, necessary virtues like patience, endurance, dexterity as well as a part of Indian cultural history may be empathized.


Where to start...? Glass beads of course were added to or replaced earlier techniques – which unfortunately are not mentioned at all! I wonder whether, among these many historic exhibits on display, there will be pieces decorated with quill work to give visitors an idea that ndn crafts did not start the very moment Euro traders sold them glass beads.

So students will each do a 'genuine' piece of jewelry. Perhaps, but certainly not 'ndn jewelry', and so of course they will not bring 'Indian culture into their life' by imitating such a bracelet! Did nobody of the staff in the educational service realize it is rather ambitious to give children an impression of 'virtues like patience, endurance, dexterity' in a one-hour workshop? Probably not. It is a pity that all they can come up with is one-hour 'We're the better Indians' workshops. With phrases like children having the opportunity to 'empathize' a 'part of Indian cultural history', one cannot help the impression that the Lokschuppen educational service employs a few nuagers, too.



Quote
Katsina figure
from grade 4
„Katsinam are everywhere and are watching us...“
In the belief of the Hopi Indians, Katsinam are invisible and good-natured spirit beings, gods, and souls of persons who passed away. In ritual dances, they were asked for assistance. Children received these figures as a present so that they could learn to understand the spirit world. From gypsum models, children chose one of the beings and give their Katsina figure an individual appearance with different paintings and decorations.

Educational objectives: Creativity, concepts of design, getting to know other denominations, religious rituals and concepts. The students will get to know exotic aesthetics and alien concepts of design. The workshop promotes understanding alien cultures. Another issue is living with nature in the annual rhythm and the seasons.

Lokschuppen apparently never bothered to establish whether this workshop is appropriate or whether ndns see copying Kachinas as completely inappropriate. Their description of Kachinas is factually wrong, too.

As far as introducing children to design concepts and aesthetics in use in other parts of the world is concerned, there are numerous objects they could have chosen instead of religious ones. Therefore, the workshop does not and cannot achieve the educational objective of promoting understanding of other cultures. How doing Kachinas might be able to bring across ideas of living with nature and with the annual seasons remains a secret the educational service does not communicate.

One question to the Lokschuppen staff: Imagine a workshop for Chinese children doing their own little cross with a Jesus figure. Will such a workshop promote understanding of Euro culture, of Euro design concepts, of Euro life and annual seasons? Will such a workshop further creativity, and knowledge of Euro religious rituals? If you answer this with 'No' – why on earth did you include the above workshop in your programme?



Quote
Dreamcatcher
from grade 5
„What an Indian dreams is reality to him...“
From beads, feathers, leather, and natural materials, students will craft their personal dreamcatcher according to the Sioux model. The adorned nets elaborately knotted and wired will take care that only good dreams will find their way into the thoughts of the sleeper. At the same time, dream catchers also symbolize the circle of life and the close connection to nature.

Educational objectives: Creativity, fantasy, craft. Understanding of alien cultures and getting to know different denominations, religious rituals and concepts, as well as critical questioning of tourist articles. Living with nature – in the annual rhythm and the seasons.

Oh well.
Just how on earth will students be able to question tourist articles when all they learn is how to imitate ndn cultural objects in a one-hour workshop? Who gave Lokschuppen the idea that dreamcatchers were 'Sioux' in the first place?

What has a dreamcatcher (or a Kachina for that matter) got to do with living with nature and any annual rhythm? Did people at Lokschuppen actually think when devising their programme of workshops or was that programme created automatically by some silly-ideas.exe?

These last two workshops will rather teach children that it is alright to appropriate and exploit other peoples' cultures and take whatever concept to play with. This is not teaching respect of other cultures, this is actively teaching disrespect, entitlement, and supremacy.

It is unfortunate – to say the least - that Lokschuppen departments of educational service and public relations have come up with a programme rife with stereotypes which effectively counters the intents of the exhibition.

As far as I picked up from a comment in a German forum, Lokschuppen museum shop hastened to come to their aid and will sell comic books etc of a series titled 'Yakari'. This is a French cartoon which was translated to several languages and adapted into a TV series. The first cartoon was published in 1977... So, yes, your concerns are fully appropriate: Yakari is an alleged Sioux boy (white supremacy does not need to care about which sounds Lakota language does or does not have....) who is able to understand and speak the language of animals. The characters are drawn in a stereotypical way, with matching names. Some of the books have been translated for the UK market, so there is an English wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakari
This is a short video (sorry, I could find no English videos, so this is in Kurdish language): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9YL0r8Iy2o

Excerpt from English wikipedia:

Quote
Concept

Yakari is a young Sioux Native American who has the particularity to be able to understand and speak animal languages. During his adventures, he meets all sorts of North American animals. His best friends are a girl Sioux, "Rainbow", and his pony "Little Thunder". He has a totem animal, "Great Eagle", wo frequently appears to him to give him critical advice.
The setting is the North American Great Plains, mainly. Horses have already been introduced by the Spanish, but there is no mentioning of white man whatsoever in the series. (In one book, there's even a mention by an old tribesman that there's a mystery how the horse came to the land, and that it hasn't always been there.) It can therefore be assumed that Yakari's adventures take place after the 15th century, but long before the settling rush in the late 18th/19th century.


Characters

Humans:
Yakari : the main character.
Rainbow : a Sioux girl and Yakari's best friend. She accompanies him on his adventures more frequently as the series progresses.
The-One Who Knows : chief and shaman of Yakari's village.
Little Big-Shot : a Sioux boy and friend of Yakari's, who dreams of becoming a great hunter.
Slow Motion : a man from Yakari's village. As his name points out, he is very slow.
No-Wai-Waiki (Great-Heap-Big-Pile-Plenty-Lazy-Bones): a man from Yakari's village. He is extremely lazy and unfit, and spends the day lying in front of his tipi and smoking his pipe.
Tranquil Rock : a sage from Yakari's village.
Bold Gaze : Yakari's father. At first quite sceptical about his son's claims that he can talk to animals, he is eventually convinced that his son does indeed have a special gift.
Braid Night : Yakari's mother, who is skilled in healing lore.
Strained Bow: a crazy wandering warrior who obsessed with hunting and bringing down the rarest and most unusual of animals. He has clashed with Yakari on several occasions and considers him to be his most personal enemy.

Animals:
Great Eagle : a great bald eagle and Yakari's totem who aids Yakari with his wisdom and advice.
Little Thunder : a white-and-black checkered poney, who is Yakari's steed and closest friend.
Nanabozo : a rabbit capable of doing magical feats, and Rainbow's totem. He has revealed himself to Rainbow and Yakari on numerous occasions and taken them on educative journeys, including a trip into prehistoric times.
Double Teeth : a beaver and artist.
Tilia : a young beaver, practical joker and adventurous.
Wild Rose Plant : a beaver, and Tilia's mother.
Rough Bark : a beaver, and Tilia's father.
Thousand Mouths : a beaver and builder.
Wood of a Bed : a beaver and a serious sleeper.
Snowball, a white-furred baribal.

May I remind you that the exhibition's principal objective is to overcome stereotypical views of ndn cultures and peoples? Jawohl! Vi heff vayz.....



A list of books giving factual information while at the same time be appealing to children and grown-up readers, or of recommendable novels, certainly is easy enough to get, but once again Lokschuppen decided to neglect respectable solutions in favour of presenting stereotypical garbage that makes one cringe.

« Last Edit: April 16, 2011, 03:02:12 pm by Ingeborg »

Offline beaverstream

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Re: Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2011, 01:34:01 am »
Hi from Munich.
What, no old Photographs of the Indian boarding schools? Hmmm too real maybe.
Great insight and interpretation.
It is an incredibly fossilized representation of Native American culture.
Everything is made into a plaything for children and adults to experience-much like the fraudulent adults (Dirk Schröder) use ceremony as playthings. I'm sure he'll be advertising his stuff there and rope in a few more adults with money to spend.
Maybe I'll stop by and collect all the flyers from the New age groups ready to cash in on the interest and spare some participants for a day.
Quote
The newly trained sneakers will pass on the knowledge of primitive peoples during guided tours through the exhibition „Indians – natives of North America“. The Indian exhibition will start on April 8.

Read more: http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?action=post;topic=3295.0;num_replies=1#ixzz1KIu72vCc
Was that the word they used in German "primitive"? I guess Native Americans are primitive? Was that then or now? Really insulting. And the way it is stated seems to imply that the knowledge was lost and lucky good old Dirk can revive it for everyone.

Is it possible to put a simple postcard sized printout with this web address and the words " find your favorite fraudulent Indian group in Germany go to  www.newagefraud.org  New Age Frauds and Plastic Shamans"

I know this all sounds bitter but people go to these things and get inspired by their dream catcher and want more.



Offline Ingeborg

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Re: Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2011, 04:14:33 pm »

On April 30, Lokschuppen did a powwow as a PR event to further promote the exhibition. 
This is the official Lokschuppen press release reporting the event:

http://www.rosenheim24.de/stadt/powwow-beim-lokschuppen-rosenheim24-1224341.html

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Rosenheim became Indian town – First Powwow at Exhibition Centre Lokschuppen

Rosenheim – On April 30, the town of Rosenheim was firmly in the hands of Indians. Exhibition Centre Lokschuppen had invited for a grand „Powwow“. With free entry and great weather, old and young people got to know dances, songs, and myths from the world of the Indians at the forecourt in front of the tipis. With Art Napoleon and Dwayne Frost from the tribe of Cree, Chris Bailer from the Oglala tribe and Robby Two Hawks from the Arapaho tribe, the numerous spectators had an opportunity to see „real“ representatives of the American Natives.

Before the folk festival of the Indians started, Dwayne Frost and Robby Two Hawks smudged the forecourt thoroughly in order to banish evil spirits. After this, Dwayne Frost spoke a prayer and thanked Manitu for the health of the people and for creation. Indian expert Kerstin Schmäling explained to visitors the customs and ways of a powwow. So Rosenheim inhabitants now are aware that one may not just beat an Indian drum at the powwow and that taking photos during theVeterans' song or the Victory Song is not allowed because these songs are sacred. Art Napoleon of the Cree people from Canada told tales of the mythology of his people. The poet, story teller, and musician also sang traditional songs of the Cree and took spectators to the modern world of Indian Folk.

There was much applause during the traditional dances which were also shown by German powwow-dancers. Hartmut and Kerstin enthused visitors with the „Hoop Dance“. During this hoop dance, various animals like eagle or buffalo are formed with the hoops. There was also a performance of the „Grass Dance“ and so-called „Intertribal Dances“. During the latter, joining in was welcome. And so children and grown-ups celebrated a great, cheerful powwow together with the Indians. Those who missed the festivity must not be sad. There will be two more powwows on June 11 and August 13.

First thing we note is that Lokschuppen apparently cannot tell Indians and Euros apart: of course there was no powwow with lots of Indians participating – the ones they had asked to dance were predominantly German dancers dressed up as Indians. It is therefore very much inappropriate of Lokschuppen to keep using the term „the Indians“ when speaking about German dancers. What was the goal of the exhibition again? - doing away with stereotype images of ndns? Ah yes, of course.

The continuation of the very same stereotypes is one reason which caused Lokschuppen to mention an artist like Art Napoleon with no more than two sentences which does him grave injustice.

The press release is also published by rosenheim24, a local info platform:
http://www.rosenheim24.de/stadt/powwow-beim-lokschuppen-rosenheim24-1224341.html

If you click at the link above, there is a photo gallery of 31 photos. None of them has been taken during the gig of Art Napoleon which is a disgrace!

There are also no photos of the hoop dance published – but this happens to be mercy rather than neglect. The hoop dance was performed by a German dancer, and you may have a look at him here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2FZ_BxBZkg
It is not that the fellow is unaware of what ndns might think of his apparel – he simply insists on doing an – errrm: naturist show.


The press release mentions a few more persons with their (alleged) tribal affiliation. One of them is Dwayne Frost on whom we already got a thread at NAFPS:

http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=519.0

Frost does not only seem to have stood up organizers in Norway, but also in Germany where he is living since several years. I found the following entry in the Karl-May-Forum:


http://www.elbflorenz.org/karl-may-stiftung.de/diskussionsforen/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=382&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=15

„posts dd Feb 12, 2006

Warning to all who may be concerned: Unfortunately, there are persons also known from powwows who are not all pleasant. The warning is about a female dancer of Woman's Traditional and her native partner resp husband. Ms May Mosler (Norway) books performances with her husband, asks for payment in advance, and then never shows up!
It's sad, but it's fact.
[…]
Her name now is Ms May Mosler-Frost, sometimes written May Moster-Frost, & Dwayne Frost (Cree-Odjibwa, CAN).
[...]
Several organizers and their audience have already been affected.

Ms May Mosler-Frost had published submissions and was booked with her husband, accepted the pay in advance and did not show up for the performance, without giving any reasons, without cancellation or such.“


Frost used to keep a website www.acimowin.eu which presently happens to be down. He advertised management courses and such. Presently, Frost may be concentrating on a career as an artist, although he tends to neglect sites he uses for promoting his paintings.I found ads for paintings at several internet portals, e.g. here:

http://www.artmajeur.com/?go=user_pages/display_all&login=gitchimanitoumuskwa

Quote
Artist's contact info :   Name : Dwayne Frost
• Email : Send a mail to Dwayne Frost

• Telephone 1 : 0049-2261-99xxxxxx
• Telephone 2 : 0049-176-29xxxxxx
• Website : www.artmajeur.com/gitchimanitoumuskwa
• Address :
xxxxxx Strasse 15
D-51xxx Gummersbach
Nord Rhein Westfalen, Germany

• Website Management :
Website maintained by : Dwayne Frost
Powered by Artmajeur™ Virtual Galleries
Last modification date : 2009-08-06

There are no photos of any of his paintings loaded up here, and the last modification date was almost two years ago. However, money apparently *is* an issue with Mr Frost, as we are invited to support the artist:

http://www.artmajeur.com/?go=user_pages/support&login=gitchimanitoumuskwa

Quote
You can show your support to this artist by offering your help in promoting his work with the following Services :

Promotion Services
Our Network receive several thousands of unique visitors everyday : Promotion Packages ensure a great amount of exposure to Artists.
As low as 50 € / USD 60

Promotion Zone 1
Images presented in Frontpage for 1 full month
As low as 75€ / USD 90

Apart from a change in name having taken place in the meantime (from Gitchi Muskwa to Gitchi Manitou Muskwa), Mr Frost is also collecting titles:

http://www.karl-may-fest.de/karlmay_media/Fotografien/Bilder+2010/Pressemitteilung+Karl_May_Festtage+Radebeul+vom+29_04_2010+.pdf.

The official poster for last year's Karl-May-Festival (May 14-16, 2010) says:

„Patrons of the 19th Karl-May-Festival are the President of Saxonian Parliament Dr. Matthias Rößler and Dwayne Frost (ambassador of the tribal council of „Matawa First Nations“).
emphasis mine

In fact, google results for Mr Frost suggest that regular appearances at the annual Karl May Festivals may have been is main activities during several years, and reports mention Frost having done paintings on a mountain for the occasions. We do not know whether he worked his butt off with these paintings, but perhaps a comment I found in a forum may shed some light on this:


http://www.mescalero.de/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2210&view=next
posted: May 23 2010, 15:27

„Dwayne Frost also took somewhat greater pains with the concept of the painting at Hohen Stein […]“

As an aside: this years programme for the festival does not mention *any* of the Indian performers' names, just the moderator who happens to be German. This year's patron, however, is Pierre Brice, the French actor who played Winnetou in the films done during the 60ies.



Offline Ingeborg

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Re: Ndn exhibition in Rosenheim, Germany
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2011, 04:20:51 pm »


The two other persons mentioned as ndn and tribal members in the press release are no enrolled members of the Oglala resp. Arapaho nations. From the info available to me, both are of descent but did not grow up in the respective cultures and do not speak the languages.

While there is not much info available online on one of these persons, there is quite some info on the alleged Robby Two Hawks whose real-life name happens to be Roberto Heindl. He not only dances at Euro powwows, but also runs a shop where he sells ndn kitsch. His website makes it quite apparent that he does not know a single word of Arapaho.


http://www.2-falken.de/

Quote
How kola

Welcome from Two Hawks. I am a Halfbreed Arapaho Indian and would like to share Indian culture and zest of life with you. From ancient Indian tradition to live events, there will be something for everybody on the following pages.
The greeting „Hau kola“ comes from the language of the Lakota and means „hello, friend“.[...]“

Heindl runs a shop by the name of „Ptan Cante“ which again are words taken from Lakota language. The words get explained in several press articles on Heindl as „place of the heart“.

Photos of articles sold pls find clicking at: „Laden“ [shop] and „Bildergalerie“ [gallery]

The shop has the following sections:

Quote
Minerals and Healing Stones
Planning of events and counceling
Relaxation with the power of mother earth
making drums
native lifestyle


Then there is also the section „Events“:

First thing visitors see is a poster of an „Indian Dance Festival“ (from 2009) organized by Giovanni de Carlo/“Tdom Bah Toden Xkee“ and Ms Jackie Fischer. Heindl further offers:

Quote
Shooting with bow and arrow:
Meditative and instinctive shooting

Indian Dance Event (Powwow)

Show:
sword fighting
fire spectacles
pub brawls


Seminars and Meditations:
drum building
smudgings
meditations in groups or individually

Pictures of Heindl's activities can be seen here:

https://picasaweb.google.com/PTanCante


A website publishes this ad on Heindl:

http://www.natuerlich-fuerth.de/index.php?id=186

Quote
In their shop in the town of Fürth, Two Hawks Management offer a range of products unique in the Fürth region in bow equipment and supplies, Indian handcraft, jewelry and much more fascinating insight into the Indian way of life.

Owner Roberto Heindl Two Hawks, halfbreed Arapaho Indian, especially minds the authenticity and originality of his goods and, purchasing directly in the reservations, support reservation inhabitants with fair prices. In his shop, you may also buy „Indian bread of the Mayas“, baked according to a secret recipe of the ancient Maya with barks and herbs. This bread is said to have a positive effect on the organism, especially on the digestive tract.

Other articles, however, mention that Heindl produces the majority of goods sold, while only „the rest“ is imported from US rezzes. Since Heindl is passing himself off as a member of the Araphao nation, we may suspect this is how he justifies the claim of selling Indian-made arts and craft, but this will not exactly qualify him for a membership in the Association of Honourable Merchants.


Here's another article from a paper introducing shop owners in the town of Fürth. This paper was published in the year 2000, and the name of Heindl's shop is taken from a different language:

http://www.altstadtverein-fuerth.de/blaeddla/35/paa00.htm

Quote
Two Hawks - real-life name Roberto Heindl – tries to bring together Celtic, medieval, and Indian cultures. Paa-Tsokoh – the 'otter' in the Comanche language – was important to all three cultures, is at least what Two Hawks says. In the way of medieval products, there are mead, Bärenfang [a hard liquor made with honey] and swords used in medieval fight shows. Going back to Celtic examples – always according to Two Hawks – various shields, arms, information about shamanism, incense as well as CDs with Celtic music.
As far as Indian culture is concerned, Two Hawks – his father is a Arapaho Indian – offers workshops in building drums, tipi tents, tipi cradles as well as workshops in self-discovery. He also produces jewelry which he will also repair if need be. Two Hawks is also active in kindergartens and schools and, with shows and events, corrects wrong conceptions and Winnetou stereotypes of Indian life.

We must give the author of this article credit for phrasing some criticism by emphasizing that he reported Heindl's views.


From another portal introducing shops in the town of Fürth:

http://www.fuerth.de/home/wirtschaft/newsarchiv/archiv-2007/kleine-feine-einkaufswelt.aspx

Quote
Ptan Cante
Roberto Heindl aka Two Hawks' shop is a great experience. Ptan Cante in translation means „place of the heart“, and one feels this standing in the midst of jewelry, minerals, drums, leather hids and incense. There are bows and arrows as well as leather clothes. Much of this is made by the „Fürth Indian“, the rest is hand-made from US reservations. In the back, there is a meditation room where he does workshops. Further offer: various semnars to feel the power of mother earth.

And this is a rare gem:

http://www.medienpraxis.tv/tag/glaube-spiritualitaet/

Februar 2003

Quote
“The earth will be new and the buffalo will come back“

Roberto Heindl aka „Two Hawks“ is a halfbreed Indian of the tribe of Plains [sic!!!] born in Germany. Roberto grew up with his mother in Franconia and suffered many repressions due to his appearance and his social status. After having left school, he tried to be an insurance salesman. But he soon realized this was not his world and returned more and more to his Indian roots. Meanwhile, he does seminars as „Two Hawks“ and in ceremonies in nature and in performances (e.g. in schools and kindergartens) attempts to keep alive the spiritual legacy of his ancestors. Together with Indian friends, he organizes supra-regional gatherings, so-called „Pow Hows“ [sic!!] and seeks possibilities for a life in an industrialized society which includes nature.


One last example of what Heindl teaches in kindergartens and schools:

https://www.oberpfalznetz.de/zeitung/1958079-126-geschichtsstunde_mit_arapho_indianer-P6,1,0.html

The article is titled: 'History lesson with Arapaho Indian', and was written about a one-day holiday programme in which children made their own 'Indian clothes' and feathered headdress, and 'of course' they put on war paint... [barf]. The kids also did bows and arrows, rain makers, and dream catchers.

Quote
Robby Two Hawks, whose ancestors once lived in the US state of Colorado, was the highlight. He told the 'little Indians' about the life of the North American natives and did away with a few 'Hollywood stereotypes': „We are all one people, one tribe, we all belong together“.[...]


So from all there is to be found on the internet, it is obvious that Heindl does not know his behind from his elbow as far as ndn cultures are concerned, and contacts to his paternal family or the Arapaho nation are very questionable, to say the least. He in fact will have seen quite some prejudice in his younger years, being the child of a US soldier, and having a non-white parent will have added to that. None of the articles, however, mentions Heindl attempting to get into contact with his father or his paternal family; Heindl instead seems to cling to a mix of various stereotypes about ndns with a few general 'green' ideas, and does not only dance at Euro powwows, but also sells workshops and does ceremonies. Although Heindl does not pass himself off as a shame-on, he seems to 'perform' ceremonies in front of an audience, so this may be seen as selling ceremonies, too. From some entries in German language forums, I get the impression that despite all this, Heindl is taken as an authority on ndn cultures and also ndn views by some of his fellow Euro dancers, which is very unfortunate.

Who ever suggested these people to Lokschuppen to hire for a powwow? And what possesed Lokschuppen to accept them?