Author Topic: Carlo Carlino AKA Carlo Hawk Walker  (Read 17405 times)

Offline Ramona1

  • Posts: 39
Carlo Carlino AKA Carlo Hawk Walker
« on: June 18, 2010, 02:02:46 am »
Anyone know anything about this guy?
WEBSITE
http://www.hawkwalker.com/
http://www.threeriversyoga.com/eventDetail.aspx?eventId=151
Native American Ceremony (Inipi) at Lotus Heart Rising with Carlo Hawkwalker
When: May 2010
Native American Ceremony (Sweat Lodge) and Community all weekend   
Where: Lotus Heart Rising
130 Willow Ridge Road
Sewickley, PA 15143
(412) 262-5445 
Cost: Monetary Donation for Carlo who is leading the lodge only, Lotus Heart donates Land 
Teacher: Carlo Hawkwalker 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We are honored to host Carlo again at Lotus Heart Rising, http://www.lotusheartrising.com
The Native American Ceremony (Inipi) will be held the last weekend in October The I-ni-pi ceremony, a type of sweat lodge, is a Lakota purification ceremony. It is an ancient and sacred ceremony of the Lakota people and has been passed down through the generations of Lakota. There is not set time, however, lodge will be sometime Friday evening and Satuday mid morning and later that day.

Carlo's teachings are profound, deep and transformational on many levels. So deep that it is impossible to describe, it has to be experienced. If you feel drawn to join us, please stop in anytiime over the weekend for this sacred ceremony of peace.

Please bring an offering of a covered dish if possible.

Tenting will be available in our field over the weekend. We do have a portable sanitation unit and also the yoga room restroom.

A huge thank you to Nancy and all those that have supported us and helped to build the lodge.
 
 
 
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 11:46:27 am by educatedindian »

Offline BlackWolf

  • Posts: 504
Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2010, 02:25:07 am »
There's no such thing as the Western Cherokee of Missouri.  There might be handfuls of people with some Cherokee heritage in Missouri because their ancestors seperated from the Tribe 200 years ago, but no Cherokee community and no Cherokee Elders there. 

These are the only 3 Cherokee Tribes and Real Cherokee Elders are found in Oklahoma and North Carolina. 
Cherokee Nation based in Northeast Oklahoma
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians based in Northeast Oklahoma
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians based in North Carolina.

No self respecting Cherokee would use the term "Mitukaye Oyasin".  The Cherokees have their own language.  I beleive its a Lakota Sioux Term thats been abused and appropriated by the Wannabees and Fakes all over the United States.  Cherokee Elders don't advertise on the Internet, and some don't even know what the Internet is.  Cherokees don't sundance, they Stomp Dance.  It seems to be popular these days to claim Cherokee heritage while badly misinterpreting Lakota and Sioux culture. Judging by the little info I'v seen so far about him on his website, I'd say he's a fake.


Offline bls926

  • Posts: 655
Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2010, 02:51:17 am »
Guess the message of Don't Pay to Pray has finally sunk in. They're all coming up with new, imaginative ways to ask for money.


Quote
Carlo Hawk Walker lives Traditional ways of Turtle Island. Within these traditions as a Peace Maker, Fire Keeper and Pipe Carrier, he has traveled the world on Peace Missions carrying teachings of Medicines of the Heart and bringing the Sacred Medicines and Bundle he carries to the People.
Over the years, Carlo has worked with Indigenous Communities of Russia, England, Barbados, New Zealand, Africa, South America and Turtle Island to forge Peace between people, cultures and religions and to overcome the obstacles that continue to allow war.

The World Peace Treaty is one of Carlo's instruments of Peace he received during ceremony while in Russia. With the help of long-time friend Robin Milstead, this Treaty is available for all Citizens of the World to sign. The signatures represent a global declaration of Peace and will be taken to the United Nations and The Hague. Find the World Peace Treaty at http://www.theworldpeacetreaty.org and follow the requests in the cover letter.

His service to the People includes having sat on the C.S.A.P. (Center of Substance Abuse Prevention) Native American Steering Committee for Substance Abuse, Washington DC and working as co-facilitator on the Indigenous Round Table of Russia, St Petersburg.

His speaking engagements include The Healing Summit , Glastonbury England, as a Peace Delegate, providing Indigenous teachings through speaking and ceremony: Carnagie Mellon University speaking on Peace: and for the National Park Service's "How Green Is Our Future?" Conference at Vassar University.

These few points of service in Carlo's life are mentioned in this bio - a format widely recognized in Western thinking. The depth of his work and life take place in the laws and realm of Spirit, as understood by his Traditions and within these Traditions, the details of such things are not spoken outside of the event. It is in spending time in ceremony with him and hearing the old songs and stories that the People can experience Spiritual and Physical healing and transformation. It is in sitting in Circle with him that the People come to know who he is.

It is also within these Traditions that this Elder cannot request money for his service. In the old ways, a Helper such as him was provided for when his or her service was requested. Transportation, food, shelter, tobacco, blankets, horses and other items were offered and so it was insured that the Helper would be able to serve when and where needed. A blanket may have been laid down on which to receive offerings from the village.

In today's villages, we travel by auto. plane, ship, train and any other means available and necessary to make our journeys. A three day trip to a neighboring state is costly. A six day or two week trip across the sea is a serious financial consideration. This is not including the work left unfinished or to be done by others at home in the Helper's absence.

Please consider this site as a Traditional Blanket on which to lay your heartfelt donations so that this Elder may continue in his Global Peace Making efforts and in bringing the Medicines of the Heart to the people in these great days of need
.

http://www.hawkwalker.com/bio/carlo.htm

(emphasis added)


Why would a Cherokee be carrying Sitting Bull's pipe?? Why would he want to?

Offline Ramona1

  • Posts: 39
Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2010, 03:59:08 am »
 I found an old news paper article (March 06, 1989) I believe it's the same guy and his real name is Carlo Carlino.
http://articles.mcall.com/1989-03-06/features/2674332_1_purification-ceremony-stones-lodge

In Search For Healing, Old Way Finds Renewal Purification Ceremony Carries On Indian Tradition
March 06, 1989|by TIM BLANGGER, The Morning Call
Quote
The people are already inside the lodge. The men wear gym shorts; the women cotton shifts.

They are packed tightly together, sitting around the sides of the circular lodge, awaiting the start of a Native American purification ceremony.

A man they call a fire tender brings the first seven heated stones inside. One by one, he places them in a pit in the center of the lodge

Carlo HawkWalker and a colleague sprinkle each stone with sprigs of sage and cedar. The sprigs crackle and glow on contact, producing a sweet-smelling smoke.

It is a few minutes past sundown. Chill February winds rustle the bare sapling branches outside the lodge in northwestern Bucks County. Inside, the stones have begun to give off heat.

The 25 or so participants for this full moon February lodge are a diverse group. Some are students, others workers. Several are local Greenpeace environmentalists.

They have all come to heal themselves, which is what they say these purifi-

cation ceremonies are all about.

"How can we save the trees unless we discover the reason why the trees are dying? How can we save the whales unless we discover the reason they are dying? And before we can find the reason, we must heal ourselves," Carlo HawkWalker says.

* * *

The people here are part of what one anthropologist, Jo Allyn Archambault, of the Smithsonian Institution's American Indian Program, sees as a national trend that involves the spread of Sioux traditions from the Great Plains to other parts of the United States.

Archambault, 47, a Sioux herself, has seen the trend develop during the past 20 years.

The purification ceremony is called inipi, after the traditional Lakota Sioux name. Its practitioners are trying to follow the traditional ways of the Lakota Sioux in this quiet place in Bucks County, far from the Black Hills of South Dakota, where many of the Lakota people live.

In keeping with tradition, Carlo and his colleagues charge nothing for the ceremony. In doing so, they differ from others who hold similar ceremonies but charge the participants a fee. Sometimes the fee is quite high, up to $500.

Here, the participants are asked to bring natural food and drink that all will share after the ceremony. An offering of natural pipe tobacco is also a welcome gift.

The ceremony itself is unadorned, but begins well before the participants crawl clockwise into the lodge.
Several hours before sunset, a fire tender begins building a fire in the spot between the two lodges. Large field stones are placed in the middle of the fire and heated for several hours, up until the beginning of the ceremony itself. Some of the participants call the stones "grandfathers, " or "bones of the earth," both signs of respect for the earth and the inter- connectedness of the world.

Some of the participants prepare small tobacco ties as an offering to the great spirit, Wakan Tanka. The tobacco is wrapped in a natural fabric and the color signifies a particular type of prayer. Red, for example, represents the blood and strength of the people and is the most sacred color among the Lakotas.

A person wishing to ask for strength would tie his tobacco in red cloth. The ties are hung in the lodge during the ceremony near the person who tied them. The ties are also believed to help the lodge participants focus their prayers.
On this February night, a thin man with long, straight hair and wire- rimmed glasses, who everyone calls Justin, is tending the fire for the ceremony.

He walks around the fire, flipping and adjusting the logs with a pitchfork, as only the fire tender can. The line between the lodges and the two fires is considered sacred, and only the fire tender can cross it. All others walk around the back of the lodges.

In ancient times, a Lakota would have used deer antlers to tend the fire and to bring the stones into the lodge, but there have been a few concessions to modernity. The pitchfork is one.

As sunset nears, the people assemble, being careful not to cross the invisible line linking the two lodges with the fire. On this night, only one lodge is being used.

The women enter first, crawling clockwise around the inside of the lodge on all fours, which, according to tradition, is another reminder of the link humans have with the animals, or "the four-leggeds," as they are called here.

The men enter next. As the women have done before them, the men say "Mitakuye Oyasin," a Lakota prayer meaning, roughly, "all my relations," as they enter the lodge.

Carlo enters last. He sits by the opening. A colleague of Carlo's - call him Tom - sits on the other side of the opening. There is laughter and small talk in the lodge as people adjust themselves to sit in the most comfortable way. People pass a handful of sage around. Each person takes some, placing the sage behind one or both of his ears. Others chew it.
Talk stops when the first of the seven stones is brought into the lodge by the fire tender. As their numbers grow, they slowly warm the lodge.

The fire tender drops the flap from the outside and the lodge becomes dark. The sage and cedar sprinkled on the stones sizzle and smoke.

The fire that has heated the stones for the past few hours burns outside. Its light enters the lodge through its four-foot opening. When the fire tender covers the opening with the lodge's flap, only the faint orange glow of the stones can be seen; it becomes very dark.
Inside the lodge, Carlo dips a buffalo horn into a plastic bucket and pours the water on the stones. He begins to chant. Almost immediately, the lodge fills with hot steam that carries with it a hint of ash from the wood fire. The purification ceremony has begun.

The ceremony is divided into four rounds, each slightly different from the others. At the end of each round, the flap is opened to allow fresh, cool air inside. All of the rounds involve prayers, songs, chants or other wordless singing led by either Carlo or Tom. Anyone who wishes to sings along.

The third round is the longest, when each person in the circle offers an individual prayer. Some pray for understanding or peace, others for departed friends. A woman has just returned earlier this day from a funeral of a friend and she offers one for him. Another person offers one for his children, and children in general. Others offer the prayer "Mitakuye Oyasin."

During the ceremonies, Carlo tells stories. Some have to do with Indian folklore, others are stories he has learned or heard. All are teaching stories, in one way or another, delivered in a calming, almost hypnotic monotone.

Before the last round, he offers water from the buffalo horn to the participants. As they drink, he talks about the water.

"Once it passes through our hands, it is no longer good," he says. "Ours is the hand that abuses the water."

What will happen in the next few years, as water becomes more scarce, he asks.

It is a powerful story, coming at a time when most of the participants are very hot and thirsty.

The final round is the quickest. At the end, the sacred pipe is brought into the lodge. It contains a mixture of tobacco, a sacred herb to the Lakota and other Indians, and some bark. It has a mild, aromatic taste. Tom lights the pipe by touching a stick to the hot stones and passes it to his left.

When the ceremony is over, most everyone crawls out, again clockwise, again on all fours

Carlo (his given name is Carlo Carlino) is a thin man, standing bolt upright at 5-foot-6. He has olive skin and a set of unwavering, dark brown eyes. He walks with a calmness and a confidence.

He has some Indian ancestry, as do a few of his colleagues who come here for the lodges. But most of the people who come here are not Indian. They are mostly whites, people attracted by the teachings and traditions of the Lakota way.

The people who come to Carlo HawkWalker's barn come for what they consider sacred ceremonies. With one exception, anyone with an interest in participating is welcome, as long as they respect the seriousness of the ceremony.
Usually, women and men take part in the ceremony together, although women are not permitted to take part during their menstrual period or for four days before or after it.

Laura Cox, a lodge participant and a state-certified drug and alcohol counselor, explained that in the Lakota tradition, women who are in their "moon period," as the Indians refer to menstruation, experience their own purification.

During their moon time, women have extraordinary energies that, the Lakota believe, interfere with the purification ceremony. Cox or another woman makes a point to explain the traditions surrounding the moon period to women who are participating for the first time.

Carlo is a Pipe Carrier and a Sun Dancer, titles that carry with them certain responsibilities in the Lakota traditions. But he offers no quick solutions, no simple cures. Neither Carlo nor any of his colleagues is considered a medicine man, or a teacher of the traditional ways. Carlo and Tom consider themselves common earth people.

Still, the people who attend the lodges at Carlo's farm along Allentown Road are reaching out to the Sioux nation. Cox, inspired by a dream following her first purification lodge several months ago, formed an organization, Earth Dance Foundation, (1019 Allentown Road, Sellersville, Pa., 18960) that hopes to raise money to bring the Lakota elders and others to Carlo's farm, so these elders can heal and teach. The organization has also raised money and collected clothing for people living on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations of South Dakota.

Like most healing, the purification ceremony can be an uncomfortable process. It is not an easy way, the participants say. The lodges get very, very hot, hotter than your average health club steam room. And at times, the lodge gets cramped.
The lodges themselves sit behind the place where Carlo HawkWalker lives, concealed from passersby in a stand of trees a few hundred yards from Carlo's farmhouse and barn. They are roughly shaped, approximate half-spheres built close to the ground; their openings face each other.

A framework of woven saplings supports the lodges. A patchwork of olive drab tarps covers the outside of the frame. Rough blankets seal the inside. From the outside, the lodges have a humble, lumpy quality.

In past times, when the buffalo was plentiful, the lodges were covered with buffalo hide. The floors were covered with sage. But both buffalo hides and sage are hard to come by, so the people here make do.
Carlo and his colleagues hold purification ceremonies in one or both of the lodges, depending on the number of people who come. They are held every full and half moon, as well as at other times.

Most people unfamiliar with Lakota ways, or the ways of other American Indians, would call the lodges and their accompanying ceremonies "sweat lodges," but Carlo, and others who walk the path of the traditional way would object to this characterization. Participants in the ceremonies do more than sweat, although there is no denying that sweat is involved.

Carlo's helper, Tom, has some Indian ancestry. Tom likes his privacy and didn't want his real name used.

Tom has spent parts of several summers studying with "the old ones," as he, Carlo and others refer to the traditional elders. He has gone on a vision quest, a period of fasting, and this summer, he plans to attend a Sun Dance, another sacred Lakota ceremony.

Like Carlo, Tom speaks in a calm voice about the sacred ceremonies he has taken part in, about the visions he has had, about his dreams, about visits from spirits who, he says, have helped guide his life.

"How did I come to the Indian way?" he says, repeating a question he has been asked. "I guess I did just about everything evil that anyone could do," he says. He laughs. "One comes to this way because it is in the heart. Many Lakota feel that these ways should be reserved only for the natives. As I only possess a small amount of native blood, I don't agree with this. From a very young age, I have felt the pull of this way. As I grew older, I was called in dreams to turn to this way of life through going on a vision quest."

The vision quest is a difficult part of this traditional Lakota way, Tom says, but that, he adds, is another story
As the people who have been through a lodge say, this way is not an easy way either. Anyone who has fears of close quarters or heat should consider not taking part in the ceremony. It can seem like a nightmare at times. One reaction might be to get out of the lodge as quickly as possible, even if the exit path doesn't involve the door. Some have tried this, Carlo says.

He says anyone can leave the lodge at any time they feel the need. In the traditional way, however, leaving the lodge during the ceremony, and thereby breaking the circle of people, is not encouraged. The circle is considered sacred, symbolizing all the Indian tribes, and by extension, all people
It has been a good ceremony, Carlo says repeatedly during the evening. There was a time, not too long ago, when only a few people would attend. Now, there is talk of building a larger lodge for the ceremonies.

Before the people begin to leave, Carlo cautions the participants to be careful during the next four days not to get into angry, acrimonious debates with others.

Outside, a light rain has begun to fall. The air had a decided chill before the lodge began, yet after two hours of steam, heat and cramped quarters, the air is cool and invigorating. Rain drops spatter the fallen leaves and tap softly on the tarps covering the lodges. The fire is nearly out.

The people towel off and don their everyday clothing. They walk, alone or in small groups, to the loft above Carlo's barn, where meatless chili, brown rice, breads and fruit juices await.

Offline Cetan

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2010, 04:40:47 pm »
I wont even comment on the claim of "The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe" - Ill leave that one for LaDonna :o

Offline educatedindian

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2010, 02:27:10 am »
He has a number of youtube videos posted. In this one he claims to be an elder for the Western Cherokee of Missouri.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ApMJt-6DcdI&feature=related

There's a Western Cherokee of Arkansas and Missouri. That's the notorious Lola Scholl's outfit. And there's been groups split off from it, and dissolved no longer existing groups. Could also be he just left out part of the name.

He doesn't seem old enough to be an elder. He looks to be in his forties. Really he does look like a big Italian wrestler.
And the claims about Sitting Bull's pipe get even crazier. He claims SB carved many pipes and gave them away as gifts while with Buffalo Bill's show. If true, then this one wouldn't be a sacred pipe, just a pipe for smoking or even decorative.
And then it gets really weird, a very mangled version of SB's death and the Wounded Knee massacre. It's creepy to listen to. I think someone Lakota might get pretty damned angry to hear it.
Most of it is vague touchy feely sentiments. There's also strange reference to the Fifth World, which I don't think is part of Cherokee OR Lakota tradition. It's more in southwest tribes and tribes in Mexico.
Oh, and get a load of him going on about extreme sports fulfilling some kind of prophecy and making a pitch to them... ::)
This is at the Coalessence Festival, but there doesn't seem to be anyone around while he's speaking.

The fest was a Nuage gathering.
http://www.coalessencefest.com/schedule_02.html?keepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&height=500&width=600

As you can see it included things like "Improv Shamanism" and Hopi prophecies.

Other videos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytck3hEKwUs&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ousJEeYUg4w&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzeL-VLjL3A&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPLY1IcaLxE&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYd03LPs_Rg&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUKPVAdYESA&feature=related

Here he is with Jim 2Feathers. It seems to be Lakota J2F is speaking at the start, but a Lakota speaker should listen to that.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvrMTD5ospY&feature=related
J2F is himself mentioned in this thread as a possible associate of a fraud, but not much more.
http://www.newagefraud.org/smf/index.php?topic=2578.0;wap2
J2F did some ceremony selling with fraud Adam DeArmon AKA Adam Yellowbird, on a Nuage outfit's site.
http://www.internationalspiritualexperience.com/page.php?114

So perhaps Carlino's "elder" is J2F, and he's someone with a bit of ancestry who got suckered by both J2F and Lola Scholl's outfit. But that speaks even less well of the "Western Cherokee." Before they were just taking people for enrollment fees. Now they're peddling Nuage nonsense to them.
 
At a site called Lost Taino Tribe he's been denounced as a fraud, but one must be a member to see the whole post.
http://www.losttainotribe.com/xn/detail/2244581:Comment:27324?xg_source=activity
Another site gives a bit of the comments.
http://www.isthisyour.name/carlos_hawk.htm

Offline piya

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2010, 05:02:58 am »
On some of the You Tube clips he is holding what looks like a Eagle feather, I can't make out if its a genuine one on them. If so does he have a permit for it? I doubt it.
To Old To Die Young

Offline earthw7

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2010, 02:42:10 pm »
Ok so many hole is this guy story, anyway if anyone had Sitting Bull's pipe we would know it, and why would Frank Fools Crow give it to white guy. Also why would a so called cherokee have Sitting Bull's pipe
As went along the US looking at claims of people have his pipe we found most of them fakes.
In Spirit

Offline MrPiz

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2010, 09:44:38 pm »
The way "they" write and talk plus the way his "indian name" is... that all sounds too much like the deer tribe is somehow involved in. very suspecting.
Walk your talk

Offline tipiuser

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2011, 01:18:30 am »
The way "they" write and talk plus the way his "indian name" is... that all sounds too much like the deer tribe is somehow involved in. very suspecting.

;) Hello, I have had a look at a utube of hawkwalker and although possibly completely out of order qualifying a view; I'm skeptical too. No one likes liers. I think they can do harm even when they think/ seem to be doing good. There may not be legal culpability but certainly in my view a moral responsibility on us all to investigate truth for ourselves.
My question to the list is has anyone got more 'research'? Making up a name and a history can be a necessary thing to do - a symptom of a sickness - I 'm just curious - hope I have not offended anyone..
Next question is 'what is the deer tribe'?.
Blessings.
'The world is one country and humankind it's citizens.' Baha'i Faith.

Offline dabosijigwokush

  • Posts: 265
Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2011, 03:45:30 pm »
lost taino tribe main sight

http://www.losttainotribe.com/

lotusheartrising.com

registrant-firstname:            Robert
registrant-lastname:             Barton
registrant-street1:              130 Willow Ridge Rd
registrant-pcode:                15143
registrant-state:                PA
registrant-city:                 Sewickley
registrant-ccode:                US
registrant-phone:                +1.4122625445
registrant-email:               
« Last Edit: January 04, 2011, 03:58:04 pm by dabosijigwokush »

Offline educatedindian

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2011, 11:32:32 pm »
The way "they" write and talk plus the way his "indian name" is... that all sounds too much like the deer tribe is somehow involved in. very suspecting.

;) Hello, I have had a look at a utube of hawkwalker and although possibly completely out of order qualifying a view; I'm skeptical too. No one likes liers. I think they can do harm even when they think/ seem to be doing good. There may not be legal culpability but certainly in my view a moral responsibility on us all to investigate truth for ourselves.
My question to the list is has anyone got more 'research'? Making up a name and a history can be a necessary thing to do - a symptom of a sickness - I 'm just curious - hope I have not offended anyone..
Next question is 'what is the deer tribe'?.
Blessings.
'The world is one country and humankind it's citizens.' Baha'i Faith.

You didn't offend anyone. The forum is here for people to ask questions and avoid being harmed.
The Deer Tribe are some of the worst abusers out there, a rightwing cult that abuses its followers sexually and prepares for race war. Use the search button at top.

The Lost Taino are a heritage group, maybe closer to reconstructionists and made up of descendants. The link I quoted had CHW being denounced by one of them.

Offline goozih

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2011, 10:12:20 pm »
Is there no end to these nuts.... :'(

Offline AnneCarolyn1

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2014, 01:15:03 am »
x
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 03:18:33 am by AnneCarolyn1 »

Offline earthw7

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Re: Carlo Hawk Walker - The sixth Keeper of Sitting Bull's Pipe
« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2014, 05:24:31 pm »
 :-[ why do people make these claims we know that they are false why do people believe them
It makes me sick that people would go this far to fool people.
In Spirit