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Good Sources-Alternatives to Nuage

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Barnaby_McEwan:

--- Quote ---If you know of any others Barnaby, add them to the list.
--- End quote ---

This is the one on Lewis:

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/

and this is the one on Skye:

http://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/

Nearer to home for me, Cornwall College at St Austell teaches Cornish language, culture and archaeology:

http://www.cornwall.ac.uk/stac/index.php?sitesig=stac&page=shared&subpage=_Course_Finder&pagetype=2&site%5B%5D=&dep=Y


--- Quote ---When you say like tribal colleges, you mean they´re intended to serve Scottish and Welsh students?
--- End quote ---

Yes, in the sense that they aim to serve the local population, rather than aiming to serve a specific ethnic group. Welsh is doing relatively well: if you go to north Wales lots of people there speak it as their first language.

As far as reading goes, I'd like to recommend John Collis' 'The Celts: Origins, Myths & Inventions' (Tempus Publishing Ltd 2003, ISBN 0 7524 2913 2) as a valuable antidote to the bletherings of the myriad self-proclaimed 'Celtic shamans'.The publisher's blurb:

--- Quote ---We use the word 'Celtic' fast and loose - it evokes something mythical and romantic about our past - but what exactly does it mean? Furthermore, why do people believe that there were Celts in Britain and what relationship do they have to the ancient Celts?

This facinating book focuses particularly on how the Celts were re-invented in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and how the legacy of mistaken interpretations still affects the way we understand the ancient sources and archaeological evidence.

John Collis is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Sheffield, and is the leading British authority on the European Iron Age.
--- End quote ---

debbieredbear:
I was warned about John and Caitlin Mathewes by a friend who is a scholar of such things. His main complaint against them is their failure to delineate between their "inspiration" and historical fact. There are more scholarly books on Celtic things who don't inject their own beliefs in that way.

Barnaby_McEwan:
That's pretty much my problem with them too.

educatedindian:
Anyone have good sources they could recommend for German pagans? I tried recommending "go to yuour own heritage" at Luneberg and got some answers that they couldnt because the Nazis have contaminated the traditions.

Barnaby_McEwan:
Many modern neo-pagans are still drawing water from the same poisoned well. It's not difficult to find neo-pagans, especially 'heathens', attempting to rehabilitate a racist crank like Guido 'von' List as a serious scholar:

Google search for "Guido von List" + heathen

I think those Nazis who were attracted to neo-pagan themes simply elaborated fanciful 'traditions' invented by their völkisch predecessors, rather than contaminating traditions which had survived pristine since the Bronze age. I get the feeling that the people who said that to you might have been using it as an excuse; and I can't help thinking it's not really Indian people's problem anyway.

The idea of a surviving ancient wisdom, waiting to be rediscovered, was a nineteenth-century innovation of the völkisch movement. Those neo-pagans who are serious about combatting racism in their own scene need to get to grips with that fact. I think the best thing German neo-pagans could do is draw a line under all that nineteenth-century billshut, use only modern scholarly sources, develop something new, and be honest about doing so. Unfortunately I don't know what those scholarly sources might be for Germans, or whether there are any Germans trying to do such a thing.

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